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Skat vs. Bobcat

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  • vicskiff
    Bobcat is Phil Bolger s derivative in plywood of the famous Beetle Cats. Skat appears to be the something similar from Jim Michalak. Bobcat (plans sold by H.H.
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 9, 2004
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      Bobcat is Phil Bolger's derivative in plywood of the famous Beetle
      Cats. Skat appears to be the something similar from Jim Michalak.
      Bobcat (plans sold by H.H. Payson as 'Tiny Cat') is 12'3" by 6 ft.
      and Skat is 12 ft by 15.5 ft. Both weigh about 250 lbs. Both are
      twin-chine. But the Michalak design carries 81 sq. ft. of gaff sail
      while the Bolger boat flies 110 sq. ft.

      Skat: http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/store/plans/jim/skat/index.htm
      Bobcat: http://www.instantboats.com/tinycat.htm

      I wonder if anybody could compare these boats for me in terms of
      performance, ease of handling, ease of construction and so on.
      Neither is a William Garden Tomcat (see last WoodenBoat magazine)
      but then that would be such a big challenge for me to build that I
      probably would never get it in the water.

      John
    • pvanderwaart
      ... Skat would be described as a V-bottom boat, not two-chine. The Edson Schock boats from which she is drived were well received and good performers. Schock
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 10, 2004
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        > Skat and Bobcat

        Skat would be described as a V-bottom boat, not two-chine. The Edson
        Schock boats from which she is drived were well received and good
        performers. Schock knew all about catboats. I think that Skat would
        be easier to build because the frames are straight.

        On the other hand, there is a whole book devoted to Bobcat, although
        Payson himself said it's not the easiest boat in the world to build.
        Plenty have been built by first-timers, though.

        You might look at the difference in freeboard. If, as I suspect, Skat
        is a bit higher-sided then you have a hint about the difference in
        intent. Higher sides and less sail area would suggest a windy area;
        low sides an more sail area suggest a calmer area. Of course, the
        Beetle Cat, from which Bobcat was derived, orginated in Buzzards Bay
        which is very windy, so that theory may be nullified. Schock came
        from Rhode Island, I think. In my experience, Naragansett Bay has no
        wind at all until a hefty sea breeze blows in during the afternoon.

        Peter
      • John Bell
        I ve sailed a Bobcat in some pretty good winds and waves. It can handle handle them quite well. It s a lot of boat in 12 . My only criticism of the boat is
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 10, 2004
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          I've sailed a Bobcat in some pretty good winds and waves. It can handle
          handle them quite well. It' s a lot of boat in 12'.

          My only criticism of the boat is that it isn't particulary comfortable. The
          large centerboard case and wide side decks make it tough to find a good
          place to sit with two aboard. But it was certainly a smart sailer.

          JB





          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "pvanderwaart" <pvanderw@...>
          > You might look at the difference in freeboard. If, as I suspect, Skat
          > is a bit higher-sided then you have a hint about the difference in
          > intent. Higher sides and less sail area would suggest a windy area;
          > low sides an more sail area suggest a calmer area. Of course, the
          > Beetle Cat, from which Bobcat was derived, orginated in Buzzards Bay
          > which is very windy, so that theory may be nullified. Schock came
          > from Rhode Island, I think. In my experience, Naragansett Bay has no
          > wind at all until a hefty sea breeze blows in during the afternoon.
          >
          > Peter
          >
        • John Bell
          I ve sailed a Bobcat in some pretty good winds and waves. It can handle handle them quite well. It s a lot of boat in 12 . My only criticism of the boat is
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 10, 2004
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            I've sailed a Bobcat in some pretty good winds and waves. It can handle
            handle them quite well. It' s a lot of boat in 12'.

            My only criticism of the boat is that it isn't particulary comfortable. The
            large centerboard case and wide side decks make it tough to find a good
            place to sit with two aboard. But it was certainly a smart sailer.

            JB





            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "pvanderwaart" <pvanderw@...>
            > You might look at the difference in freeboard. If, as I suspect, Skat
            > is a bit higher-sided then you have a hint about the difference in
            > intent. Higher sides and less sail area would suggest a windy area;
            > low sides an more sail area suggest a calmer area. Of course, the
            > Beetle Cat, from which Bobcat was derived, orginated in Buzzards Bay
            > which is very windy, so that theory may be nullified. Schock came
            > from Rhode Island, I think. In my experience, Naragansett Bay has no
            > wind at all until a hefty sea breeze blows in during the afternoon.
            >
            > Peter
            >
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