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Re: [bolger] Ultralight boatbuilding.

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  • Bruce Hallman
    ... The aircraft dacron fabric shrinks with a heat gun and the tension would control the float. Building a kayak to Kotick s lines using aircraft dacron
    Message 1 of 18 , Jan 30, 2004
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      --- Nels <arvent@...> wrote:
      > Seems to me that dacron [would float]
      The aircraft dacron fabric
      shrinks with a heat gun and
      the tension would control the
      float.

      Building a kayak to Kotick's lines
      using aircraft dacron instead of
      wooden strips for planking seems
      a worthwhile experiment, [as that
      would be a light weight boat!], and
      Bolger has written that light
      weight is one of Kotick's virtues.
    • Bruce Hallman
      ... Here is a picture: http://hallman.org/sbj/56/monfort.gif
      Message 2 of 18 , Jan 30, 2004
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        > The aircraft dacron fabric

        Here is a picture:

        http://hallman.org/sbj/56/monfort.gif
      • Nels
        ... Sorry Bruce, I thought you were referring to using dacron with epoxy over plywood, instead of using fiberglass - seeing it is cheaper. Using dacron to
        Message 3 of 18 , Jan 30, 2004
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          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, Bruce Hallman <bruce@h...> wrote:
          > --- Nels <arvent@h...> wrote:
          > > Seems to me that dacron [would float]
          > The aircraft dacron fabric
          > shrinks with a heat gun and
          > the tension would control the
          > float.

          Sorry Bruce,

          I thought you were referring to using dacron with epoxy over plywood,
          instead of using fiberglass - seeing it is cheaper.

          Using dacron to build a skin on frame boat is no problem as you do
          not even use any expoxy, except as a glue for the wood framing and to
          attach the kevlar roving. I believe ceconite is all you use to
          waterproof the dacron and pain is even optional.

          Nels
        • Nels
          ... I believe ceconite is all you use to ... Paint is optional as well:-)
          Message 4 of 18 , Jan 30, 2004
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            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Nels" <arvent@h...> wrote:
            I believe ceconite is all you use to
            > waterproof the dacron and pain is even optional.
            >
            > Nels

            Paint is optional as well:-)
          • chodges31711
            ... Look at http://www.ceconite.com for info on that system.
            Message 5 of 18 , Jan 30, 2004
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              --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Nels" <arvent@h...> wrote:
              > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Nels" <arvent@h...> wrote:
              > I believe ceconite is all you use to
              > > waterproof the dacron and pain is even optional.
              > >
              > > Nels
              >
              > Paint is optional as well:-)

              Look at

              http://www.ceconite.com

              for info on that system.
            • Nels
              ... Pretty funny! Is says: Professional results without pain.
              Message 6 of 18 , Jan 30, 2004
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                --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "chodges31711" <chodges@a...> wrote:
                > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Nels" <arvent@h...> wrote:
                > > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Nels" <arvent@h...> wrote:
                > > I believe ceconite is all you use to
                > > > waterproof the dacron and pain is even optional.
                > > >
                > > > Nels
                > >
                > > Paint is optional as well:-)
                >
                > Look at
                >
                > http://www.ceconite.com
                >
                > for info on that system.

                Pretty funny! Is says:

                "Professional results without pain."
              • Lincoln Ross
                I have been co owner of such a boat. (Monfort Cartopper 9) Plenty strong as long as you don t hit anything, and maybe just plenty strong if it s new (which
                Message 7 of 18 , Jan 30, 2004
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                  I have been co owner of such a boat. (Monfort Cartopper 9) Plenty strong
                  as long as you don't hit anything, and maybe just plenty strong if it's
                  new (which ours wasn't). Very light. I'd suggest you look at some of the
                  covering material provided by a guy named Dyson, who wrote a popular
                  book about baidarkas. It's much heavier than the aircraft dacron, tho I
                  don't think it shrinks the same way. I wish that cartoon came out more
                  clearly. Looks gorgeous. Beware of excessively hollow curvature with
                  fabric covering (not sure on this hull as cartoon was blurry and I am
                  not sure how well my mental picture correlates with fabric properties).
                  Where does the original cartoon occur?

                  >Bruce wrote:
                  >
                  >I was just daydreaming of building
                  >the Bolger Cartoon rowboat
                  >http://hallman.org/sbj/29/4.gif
                  >using aircraft dacron and kevlar
                  >roving for the sheathing like
                  >done by Platt Monfort with his
                  >'geodesic boats' Does anybody
                  >around here have any experience
                  >with that type of boat building?
                  >
                • Lincoln Ross
                  Yah. Epoxy doesn t stick to it worth a !@#$. I ve used it for peel ply. (Remember that when building glass boats, might be handy.) It s an entirely different
                  Message 8 of 18 , Jan 30, 2004
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                    Yah. Epoxy doesn't stick to it worth a !@#$. I've used it for peel ply.
                    (Remember that when building glass boats, might be handy.) It's an
                    entirely different material. A lot harder to stick down than cotton or
                    else Steve Whitman, reknowned air racer, would still be alive! But our
                    boats don't go 180mph so we probably won't have that problem if we're at
                    all careful, and the airplane guys won't if they follow the new fangled
                    instructions. I suppose if you used nitrate or butyrate dope to put it
                    on with you could keep your plywood from checking. Anyone try this? Oh,
                    and check with Defender (www.defenderus.com) and you might find less of
                    a price difference. At least there was less of one in the past. Don't
                    count on much in the way of structural properties from aircraft dacron.

                    >Bruce wrote:
                    >FWIW, dacron aircraft fabric
                    >appears to cost about half $$$
                    >of equivalent weight fiberglass
                    >fabric. There must be some
                    >*gotcha* I am missing.
                    >
                    >http://tinyurl.com/yt28s
                    >
                  • Bruce Hallman
                    ... Yes, so obvious, I missed that, of course. ... Small boat journal Vol #29 http://hallman.org/sbj/29/ Those images are only blurry viewed in Internet
                    Message 9 of 18 , Jan 31, 2004
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                      --- Lincoln Ross wrote:
                      >. Beware of excessively
                      > hollow curvature with
                      > fabric covering

                      Yes, so obvious, I
                      missed that, of course.

                      > Where does the original cartoon occur?

                      Small boat journal Vol #29

                      http://hallman.org/sbj/29/

                      Those images are only blurry viewed
                      in Internet Explorer. Right click,
                      and choose 'save as' and view them in
                      an graphics program of your choice.
                      I like Irfanview.
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