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[bolger] Re: re: Convertible Cabin-top

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  • Lincoln Ross
    I have a vague recollection of something like this that was available in the 1970 s, possibly by Oday. short-@shortypen.com wrote: original
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 1, 2000
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      I have a vague recollection of something like this that was available
      in the 1970's, possibly by Oday.

      short-@... wrote:
      original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger/?start=3346
      > 1 - How about a telescoping cabin that would pop up? snip
      > 2 - How about a hinged cabin that rotates up? snip
      >
      > snip. Wonder why a boat like this
      > hasn't been designed yet?
      >
    • Shorty@ShortyPen.com
      1 - How about a telescoping cabin that would pop up? Normal looking deck, then, after dropped sail, pull up the cabin. That way can keep a low sail and have
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 1, 2000
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        1 - How about a telescoping cabin that would pop up? Normal looking
        deck, then, after dropped sail, pull up the cabin. That way can keep a
        low sail and have a tall cabin.

        2 - How about a hinged cabin that rotates up? The hinge at the forward
        edge of the cabin, triangular shaped sides to the cabin, and pops up
        when sails are dropped.

        I really like the idea! Low center of gravity while sailing, tall cabin
        at anchor (home made anchor that is). Wonder why a boat like this
        hasn't been designed yet?
      • KF4call@aol.com
        In a message dated 00-03-01 22:28:23 EST, you write:
        Message 3 of 11 , Mar 1, 2000
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          In a message dated 00-03-01 22:28:23 EST, you write:

          << - How about a telescoping cabin that would pop up? Normal looking
          deck, then, after dropped sail, pull up the cabin. That way can keep a
          low sail and have a tall cabin. >>

          One of the major manufacturers of porta-potties already makes one. It is an
          inflatable. Sort of a phone booth-like room with inflatable pillars on each
          corner and a porta-pottie sitting on the floor of the booth.. An outrageous
          price as I recall though.

          <<How about a hinged cabin that rotates up? The hinge at the forward
          edge of the cabin, triangular shaped sides to the cabin, and pops up
          when sails are dropped>>

          I thought of something similar...a set up like the sun screen on a
          traditional baby buggy, ...side frames about 3-4 feet long, with pivot points
          aft and the "top" of the frame made to fold down forward (side frames joined
          forward at a central point ) or to fold "up" aft to extend over the storage
          compartment of an Oldshoe (or similar small boat), which could have a
          portapottie placed in it.

          Regards, Warren
        • Wmrpage@aol.com
          The correct analogy is not between an open box and one with abutting flaps, but between a box with closed and joined flaps (i.e. able to take both compression
          Message 4 of 11 , Mar 1, 2000
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            The correct analogy is not between an open box and one with abutting flaps,
            but between a box with closed and joined flaps (i.e. able to take both
            compression and tension loads) and one with separated flaps, joined only at
            one end (i.e. near the bow). The latter corresponds to the the "slotted
            cabin" designs. The former is a box girder. In doing this experiment with
            small boxes, the ability of closely fitting flaps to absorb compression loads
            might give a misleading impression. If the flaps of the latter are trimmed
            back so they don't can't make contact with each other and that box's rigidity
            compared to that of a box with the flaps butted and taped together, I think
            you might find some merit in my argument. I remain inclined to think that as
            far as structural strength is concerned, the two halves of a "slotted" cabin
            top have to be considered as independent, non-mutually supporting,
            structures. As far as bouyancy generating structures above the sheer-line
            ("top-sides") go, can you suggest a suitable terminology that takes into
            account the bouyancy of both the "top-sides" and the cabin sides, as so
            dramatically described in Bolger's description of "Birdwatcher" laid on its
            beams ends so the children can watch the fishies through the submerged cabin
            windows?

            Bill in tropical MN, wondering where I put my canoe's new license.
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