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[bolger] Re: Home made table saws

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  • Chris Crandall
    ... Just one a fine point, the copyright still obtains. HOwever, this might very well be considered fair use. Get a copy from the library, it s great! Chris
    Message 1 of 19 , Mar 1 3:11 PM
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      On Wed, 1 Mar 2000, david wrote:

      > sure that the pedigree goes back further than that. If anyone wants a
      > copy, I can scan the Fred Bingham design and send it off. The book was
      > published in 1983 and no longer in print, I think, so we wouldn't be
      > violating copyright law, david

      Just one a fine point, the copyright still obtains. HOwever, this might
      very well be considered fair use.

      Get a copy from the library, it's great!

      Chris Crandall crandall@... (785) 864-4131
      Department of Psychology University of Kansas Lawrence, KS 66045
      I have data convincingly disconfirming the Duhem-Quine hypothesis.
    • David Ryan
      ... saws (and planes, jointers, routers, drills, you name it) as well. Frankly, My point was not that factory tools are just as dangerous as half-baked
      Message 2 of 19 , Mar 1 7:31 PM
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        >Chuck,
        >I used one and I still had ten fingers, last time I counted. My
        >father has 9 2/3
        >fingers, but he lost the end of the one to a bone infection in
        >childhood, not his
        >saw. As Dave Ryan pointed out, plenty of people cut off fingers with expensive
        saws (and planes, jointers, routers, drills, you name it) as well. Frankly,

        My point was not that factory tools are just as dangerous as
        half-baked home-made jobbies.

        Rather, it was that the most experience users given all the
        advantages in safety and ergonomic design still manage to have their
        situation go from "just fine" to "completely unacceptable" in the
        blink of an eye.

        With regard to hokey home-made saw rigs, to quote from our name sake
        (when commenting on some only slighly more ill-advised modifications
        to, and uses of the LS Margaret Ellen,) "The worst case scenarios
        range from embarrassing to fatal."

        I'm quite willing to risk death (if the risk is very slight,) for a
        little glory. But I'm quite sure I'm not willing to risk the
        embarrassment of cutting off my own finger because I couldn't find
        $100 for an incredibly useful tool.

        Yes, you could do the same stupid thing with a Rockwell, but at least
        you wouldn't have spend the rest your life explaining why you were
        using a Rockwell.



        David Ryan
        Minister of Information and Culture
        Crumbling Empire Productions
        (212) 247-0296
      • alex
        The book is published by International Marine, Camden, Maine I can copy a couple of pages for you if your library does not have it. Email me at alexm@home.com
        Message 3 of 19 , Mar 1 9:04 PM
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          The book is published by International Marine, Camden, Maine

          I can copy a couple of pages for you if your library does not
          have it. Email me at alexm@...
          alex

          cpcorrei-@... wrote:
          original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger/?start=3312
          > In a message dated 2/29/00 9:30:23 PM Pacific Standard Time,
          alexm@...
          > writes:
          >
          > << It's inaccurate and rather dangerous contraption, but, if you
          > are into it, check "Boat Joinery and Cabinetmaking Simplified"
          > by Fred Bingham. He calls it a $5 saw.
          > >>
          >
          > Where would you find this?
          >
        • alex
          Or you can replace the original bench saw top with a homemade. All it takes is to drill holes for 8 bolts (Delta and B&D models) and chisel a bit underneath
          Message 4 of 19 , Mar 1 9:52 PM
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            Or you can replace the original bench saw top with a homemade. All it
            takes is to drill holes for 8 bolts (Delta and B&D models) and chisel a
            bit underneath the motor mounts. This way you could still use a stock
            blade guard, through mine was unworthy. I would be more concern with
            jury-rigged fences like the one Bill described below, since even a
            small slant of a fence towards the back of the blade can result in
            injury. And I agree with Bill that reaping narrow stuff is dangerous -
            use pushsticks and featherboards.

            At any rate, in my books, a table saw is only as good as its fence, and
            good fences are expensive. Which might make a decent used table saw a
            better deal. I took a different route and build a table for both a
            router and the old bench saw, so I felt less guilty talking myself into
            Incra fence...

            I have to admit that building my own table saw was almost as enjoyable
            as building a boat

            alex


            "william d> jochems" <wjochem-@...> wrote:
            original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger/?start=3333
            > Bolgeristas,
            > The worst features of bench saws are the small tops and flimsy
            fences. A
            > new top, 2 or 3 times larger than original, can be made of half inch
            ply and
            > bolted down to the original top. Cut an opening for the blade and
            draw a
            > series of lines all the way across the new top parallel to the blade.
            Then
            > use a very straight board about 1 1/2 by 1 1/2 as a fence, which you
            align
            > with the pencil lines and secure with a "C" clamp at either end. The
            > improvement is well worth the small loss of depth of cut. But, it's
            also
            > more dangerous since you no longer have a guard. Incidentally, I'm
            told that
            > the most frequent injury is from pulling small boards through. The
            blade can
            > drive the board backwards, dragging the pulling hand into the blade.
            > Bill Jochems----Original Message-----
            > From: Peter Vanderwaart <pvanderw@...>
            > To: bolger@... <bolger@...>
            > Date: Wednesday, March 01, 2000 10:23 AM
            > Subject: [bolger] Re: Home made table saws
            >
            >
            > >
            > >To: Cheap saw enthusiasts
            > >
            > >Once upon a time, about 1974, a friend who was enthused about
            > >woodworking got me a little enthused about boatbuilding. This was
            when
            > >I started the my Elegant Punt.
            > >
            > >I acted on his idea for a table saw which was to buy a very
            > >inexpensive, small table saw, the top surface of which is about a
            foot
            > >square. It is powered by a separately purchased electric motor via a
            > >belt. I can't remeber if the cost was $30 total, or $30 for the saw
            and
            > >$30 for the motor. These things were probably advertised in the back
            of
            > >Popular Science.
            > >
            > >Following my friend's suggestions, this small saw was set flush in
            the
            > >surface of a rough, homemade wooden table (2'x4'). I dadoed a groove
            > >for a guide for the stock.
            > >
            > >This contrivence has not been used in years, but I still have it,
            piled
            > >two feet high with junk, mostly useless pieces of scrap wood. I will
            > >certainly never use it. If I ever need a table saw I will buy a
            > >sensible used saw from the classified ads or eBay. Or Home Depot.
            > >
            > >If anyone wants it, e-mail me. You can find my unabridged e-mail
            > >address at
            > >http://members.xoom.com/vandep I'm in Connecticut.
            > >
            > >Peter in Stamford, CT who is really more interested in design than
            > >building, more mathematician than wood butcher, more computer
            > >programmer than wood finisher.
            > >
            > >
          • david
            Chuck, I used one and I still had ten fingers, last time I counted. My father has 9 2/3 fingers, but he lost the end of the one to a bone infection in
            Message 5 of 19 , Mar 1 10:08 PM
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              Chuck,
              I used one and I still had ten fingers, last time I counted. My father has 9 2/3
              fingers, but he lost the end of the one to a bone infection in childhood, not his
              saw. As Dave Ryan pointed out, plenty of people cut off fingers with expensive
              saws (and planes, jointers, routers, drills, you name it) as well. Frankly, I'm
              afraid of all my power tools no matter what they cost. It's a healthy attitude to
              maintain as long as it inspires caution instead of hysteria. I'll send you the
              plans as soon as I get my daughter (the computer czarina) to help me with the
              multileveled graphics program that has to be negotiated to get the picture from
              the scanner to Netscape. Btw, how many people have injured themselves while
              trying to beat their computers into submission?

              CPCorreia@... wrote:

              > In a message dated 3/1/00 9:50:37 AM Pacific Standard Time, galvind@...
              > writes:
              >
              > << I can scan the Fred Bingham design and send it off. The book
              > was published in 1983 and no longer in print, I think, so we wouldn't
              > be violating copyright law,
              > david >>
              >
              > David,
              >
              > I would love a copy of this for interest sake, but I've been put off a bit
              > from my original post by all the talk of losing fingers and being chased by a
              > runaway saw!
              >
              > Chuck C., FS, on the banks of the Suisun Slough, contemplating a long life
              > with 10 fingers.....
            • david
              David Ryan, Whatevah.... Maybe you should try to lighten up a little. The caution sign was turned on a long time ago, and nobody s arguing with you, david
              Message 6 of 19 , Mar 1 10:33 PM
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                David Ryan,
                Whatevah.... Maybe you should try to lighten up a little. The caution
                sign was turned on a long time ago, and nobody's arguing with you,
                david

                David Ryan wrote:

                >My point was not that factory tools are just as dangerous as
                half-baked home-made jobbies.

                Rather, it was that the most experience users given all the
                advantages in safety and ergonomic design still manage to have their
                situation go from "just fine" to "completely unacceptable" in the
                blink of an eye.

                With regard to hokey home-made saw rigs, to quote from our name sake
                (when commenting on some only slighly more ill-advised modifications
                to, and uses of the LS Margaret Ellen,) "The worst case scenarios
                range from embarrassing to fatal."

                I'm quite willing to risk death (if the risk is very slight,) for a
                little glory. But I'm quite sure I'm not willing to risk the
                embarrassment of cutting off my own finger because I couldn't find
                $100 for an incredibly useful tool.

                Yes, you could do the same stupid thing with a Rockwell, but at least
                you wouldn't have spend the rest your life explaining why you were
                using a Rockwell....
                 

                 
              • david
                Chuck, Here are the plans, better late than never I suppose, david
                Message 7 of 19 , Mar 4 6:02 PM
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                  Chuck,
                  Here are the plans, better late than never I suppose,
                  david

                  CPCorreia@... wrote:

                  David,

                  I would love a copy of this for interest sake, but I've been put off a bit
                  from my original post by all the talk of losing fingers and being chased by a
                  runaway saw!

                  Chuck C., FS, on the banks of the Suisun Slough, contemplating a long life
                  with 10 fingers.

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