Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

[bolger] Re: Plans for Storm Petrel?

Expand Messages
  • David Beede
    Curious about the name Storm Petrel ? I ran across another design by that name on the web... http://www.swallowboats.demon.co.uk/storm-petrel.htm A double
    Message 1 of 12 , Mar 1 11:58 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      Curious about the name "Storm Petrel"?
      I ran across another design by that name on the web...
      http://www.swallowboats.demon.co.uk/storm-petrel.htm
      A double ender by a UK designer Nick Newland of Swallowboats.
      Seemed such an odd name to be duplicated so I thought there may be
      a referent here I'm not familiar with?
      david


      Matthew Long wrote:

      >
      > The only Storm Petrel I know of is modified with a more traditional
      doghouse and a spritsail sloop rig, and is currently sailing (15 years
      and counting) on the San Francisco Bay.

      The owner is named Marc Lander, and he bought the boat from the second
      owner, who bought the boat from the builder--Marc's own cousin!

      I will email him privately and ask him to contact you.

      Regards,

      Matthew

      "greg curtis" <gbcurti-@...> wrote:
      original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger/?start=2374
      > Thanks for the information. If the boat gets
      > built, which is likely since I'm almost finished
      > with the current boatbuilding project, I'll
      > let you know how it sails on San Francisco Bay.
      >
      > Greg Curtis
      >

      > -----------------------------------------------------------------------
      >
      >
      > eGroups.com Home: http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger
      > www.egroups.com - Simplifying group communications

      --

      SOME CLICKS THAT COUNT!!
      Feed someone.
      http://www.thehungersite.com/
      Save a little rain forest.
      http://rainforest.care2.com/front.html/player12296

      Simplicity Boats (& mirror sites)
      http://members.tripod.com/simplicityboats/index.html
      http://members.xoom.com/simpleboats/index.html
      Here's my latest boat:
      http://members.tripod.com/simplicityboats/featherwind.html
      http://members.xoom.com/simpleboats/featherwind.html
      Quasi esoteric musical instruments
      http://unicornstrings.com
    • Matthew Long
      I did some research on this because Bolger s design appeals to me. Storm petrels are a family of seabirds related to albatroses and the like. They spend
      Message 2 of 12 , Mar 1 1:45 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        I did some research on this because Bolger's design appeals to me.

        Storm petrels are a family of seabirds related to albatroses and the
        like. They spend almost their whole lives on the open ocean, and I
        think they were once considered to be harbingers of storms (hence the
        name). They exist in enormous, uncounted numbers spread over the
        oceans of the world. I read somewhere that the sparrow-sized Wilson's
        storm petrel may be the most numerous of all birds. They are also
        known for "running" across the surface of the water with wings
        outstretched.

        Any of these things might account for the popularity of the name for
        small ocean-going boats.

        Here's a link to an Encyclopedia Brittanica article

        http://www.britannica.com/bcom/eb/article/2/0,5716,71652,00.html

        and a photo

        http://museum.ednet.ns.ca/mnh/nature/nsbirds/bns0019.htm

        Matthew "ready to start the Storm Petrel club" Long

        david beede <juliej-@...> wrote:
        original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger/?start=3327
        > Curious about the name "Storm Petrel"?
        > I ran across another design by that name on the web...
        > http://www.swallowboats.demon.co.uk/storm-petrel.htm
        > A double ender by a UK designer Nick Newland of Swallowboats.
        > Seemed such an odd name to be duplicated so I thought there may be
        > a referent here I'm not familiar with?
      • David Ryan
        FBBB -- Thanks for the lesson. It makes me rather curious about the boat. Any online pictures/drawings? ... David Ryan Minister of Information and Culture
        Message 3 of 12 , Mar 1 1:50 PM
        • 0 Attachment
          FBBB --

          Thanks for the lesson. It makes me rather curious about the boat. Any
          online pictures/drawings?



          >I did some research on this because Bolger's design appeals to me.
          >
          >Storm petrels are a family of seabirds related to albatroses and the
          >like. They spend almost their whole lives on the open ocean, and I
          >think they were once considered to be harbingers of storms (hence the
          >name). They exist in enormous, uncounted numbers spread over the
          >oceans of the world. I read somewhere that the sparrow-sized Wilson's
          >storm petrel may be the most numerous of all birds. They are also
          >known for "running" across the surface of the water with wings
          >outstretched.
          >

          David Ryan
          Minister of Information and Culture
          Crumbling Empire Productions
          (212) 247-0296
        • Matthew Long
          If you mean the boat, not the bird, search for storm petrel to find my (and others ) earlier postings in the group, most recently #3304. Here is the link
          Message 4 of 12 , Mar 1 3:15 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            If you mean the boat, not the bird, search for "storm petrel" to find
            my (and others') earlier postings in the group, most recently #3304.

            Here is the link again to Chuck Merrell's site for Phil's DIFFERENT
            BOATS chapter on Storm Petrel in Adobe Acrobat .pdf format:

            http://members.xoom.com/_XMCM/merrellc1/Files/petrel.pdf

            There are also a couple of pics in the vault of Marc Lander's
            spritsail-sloop-rigged Storm Petrel in San Francisco, as well as my
            sketch of a modified (cuddy top and "eye" deadlights) one.

            Regards,

            Matthew

            david ryan <davi-@...> wrote:
            original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger/?start=3335
            >
            > FBBB --
            >
            > Thanks for the lesson. It makes me rather curious about the boat. Any
            > online pictures/drawings?
          • Lincoln Ross
            I know the following is a long post, but it seems relevant to the recent discussions of the Storm Petrel and of rigs. I quote below from two messages I
            Message 5 of 12 , Mar 3 5:22 PM
            • 0 Attachment
              I know the following is a long post, but it seems relevant to the
              recent discussions of the Storm Petrel and of rigs. I quote below from
              two messages I received from various Newlands (I've lost track, or
              possibly just one) of Swallowboats.

              "The dipping lug is a fantastic rig in many ways. Our designer is a big
              fan of Phil Bolger! However, I have sailed her extensively with the
              dipping lug and tacking is not the main problem in my experience.
              Because the sail is so small (70 sq foot, as opposed to a few hundred sq
              foot in the trad fishing boats) it can be dipped by unhooking the tack
              and flicking the throat of the sail round the mast, then re hooking. It
              does take longer than a normal rig, and is quicker with two, as the
              other person can move the sheet block to the other side of the boat,
              whilst the crew man is dipping.
              In my experience the worst feature of the rig is that it is not very
              stable when running in a blow. Bolger says it is docile....hmmm... maybe
              it is when you have a few tonnes of lead in your keel, as his live-
              aboard has. On a small dingy, the twist in the sail causes rythmic
              rolling which nearly capsized me the other day! In addition to this, if
              the sail is let out too far, the boat can capsize the "wrong" way, that
              is too windward. obviously the sheets would be knotted to prevent this,
              but it still feels out of control when running to my mind. Having said
              this, It was approaching a force 7 and on a broad reach I am sure I had
              her almost planing!, which for her double ended hull form is pretty much
              impossible!
              I thought about adding some form of loose footed boom from the mast to
              the clew, but concluded it would get in the way a lot when dipping. I
              have yet to do the experiments on this though, and if you are
              interested, I will get back to you, hopefully with photos.
              At the moment I am sailing her with a balanced lug rig, which is
              superbly controllable, with an adjustable outhaul, and temporary full
              width, variable thickness battens.
              She performs well under this rig, and we have some photos at the
              developers, which we will post on the website as soon as we have them
              back.
              > > http://www.swallowboats.demon.co.uk/storm-petrel.htm
              > > A double ender by a UK designer Nick Newland of Swallowboats.
              > snip
              With reference to the lug rigs...
              The fully battened sail definitely improves the performance somewhat,
              especially when sailing on the "wrong" tack. The battens help to hold
              the shape over the mast. The tension in the foot of the sail (outhaul)
              is fairly important, but we are also looking at some different ways of
              easing the problem. Aerodynamics tells us that there must be a loss of
              efficiency on the wrong tack, but to be honest, I have not noticed it
              myself when sailing.
              In light to moderate winds I can reliably tack the rig through 80
              degrees, though the last 5 on either side tend to be a bit slower. In
              stronger winds, the head of the sail gets blown too much to leeward
              meaning that the boom has to be sheeted almost to the centreline in
              order for the top of the sail to be working. This twist in high windsis
              a problem, but we are experimenting with different cuts of sail to see
              what can be done to address this problem.
              Unfortunately, test conditions here on the West coast of Wales have been
              far from perfect over the last month or so, and it has been difficult to
              obtain much meaningful test information.
              We have far from given up on the dipping lug rig, but do feel that it is
              not giving it's full potential yet. In theory, it should perform
              superbly, and this is what we are working towards!


              >
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.