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trailerability / usability

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  • Wayne Gilham
    Another experience weighing in on this topic: I made my Black Skimmer eminently trailerable when she was my only boat in an area perfectly suited to her: the
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 2, 2003
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      Another experience weighing in on this topic:

      I made my Black Skimmer eminently trailerable when she was my only boat in
      an area perfectly suited to her: the shallow northern reaches of the
      Chesapeake.

      She sure was heavy for trailering -- about 2900lb with all gear (remember
      this design has over 500# steel-plate ballast inside the hull, and no
      concessions to lightweight construction), the boat and trailer got to about
      3500lb total, checked by rolling across a trucker's scale. Really knew she
      was behind the 'ol tow vehicle (an early-style, that is,
      square-corner-bodied, Dodge Caravan V-6 with the 3-speed automatic -- be
      forewarned the same vehicle a coupla years later with the "new improved"
      four-speed auto was way too fragile in the tranny department!)

      Trailer was a full-roller "easyloader" type, with all the pivoting
      roller-sets re-adjusted away from vee-shape to make a flat-athwartships
      support for the hull. At 1" thick, the boat's plywood bottom was not at all
      stressed by the point-loading of the rollers -- no "dents" formed, even with
      an across-our-continent drive!. Could actually use the trailer's winch to
      crank the boat up the trailer when the launch-ramp wasn't steep enough for
      full-immersion of the trailer.... but needed vertical poles on the trailer's
      sides to keep the boat centered.

      Built a metal tabernacle of sorts, fastened at deck-level to the front of
      the cabin-top, for the loooooooooooooong mast; certainly not
      counter-balanced; I found it necessary to set up an eight foot pole off the
      trailer's winch-post for a decent purchase, then winched the mast up. When
      pivoted down, the mast and mizzen and boom all fit into a removable crutch
      over the companionway; tail ends supported by another crutch on a 5' long
      pole that fit into the mizzen-mast "socket". Leeboards were stored flat,
      bolted onto the trailer frame under the boat's bow. Took two of us a good
      hard 45 minutes to rig and launch her after arriving at the ramp (willing to
      discuss the adaptations, and the "drill", if any others are interested). I
      bet all this is a bleeping lot more work than setting up a Micro....

      Did this for a couple of seasons. (now, mind you, the drive from our home
      to the launch-site was nearly two and a half hours each way.) Then got a
      dockside mooring (yeah costly) at the same location, same long drive to use
      the boat, and found we used the boat at least four times more often thru
      those "moored" summers. Sure was nice to arrive at the marina, toss on two
      duffles and a rubbermaid cooler, untie and be off for the weekend.

      so everybody, let's not be so cheap to avoid spending some moorage $, it
      just might be worth it for convenience and therefore greater
      time-on-water!!!

      on the other hand, please realize that even a damnheavy Bolger boat not
      necessarily designed "from the ground up" to be trailerable, can indeed be
      adapted for trailering.

      Wayne Gilham
      ....now resident on the left coast (Puget Sound) with "Rayador" (the name? go to your Spanish-language bird-guide-books...) sitting on her trailer in my driveway, just can't part with her exquisite functionality, even though there's also a big ol center-cockpit Irwin 43 ("tupperware!") eating up the mooring budget....she's now the one ready to go at the drop of a duffle-bag.

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    • Ken
      And if you live in said boat too, you will realize the greatest bargin. The line between work/play should disapeer and not just for the retired... Ken so
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 2, 2003
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        And if you live in said boat too, you will realize the greatest bargin. The line between work/play should disapeer and not just for the retired...
        Ken

        so everybody, let's not be so cheap to avoid spending some moorage $, it
        just might be worth it for convenience and therefore greater
        time-on-water!!!



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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