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Re: [bolger] Pilothouse windows [was Bow Shed]

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  • Bruce Hallman
    ... I don t regret the rounded corners, I like the way they look, but it *was* extra work. Also, I think that the rounding, [would you call that filleting?]
    Message 1 of 25 , Nov 2, 2003
      --- sctree wrote:
      > > rounded corners.
      >
      > Luckily I have squared corners.

      I don't regret the rounded
      corners, I like the way they
      look, but it *was* extra work.
      Also, I think that the rounding,
      [would you call that filleting?]
      also serves structurally with the
      connections of the stiles and rails,
      and that is probably the reason that
      the PB&F plans show them.

      > My intent is to fit the panes before
      > assembling the final stile, then
      > fitting the whole mess to the cabin.

      How will you connect the last joint?
      I found it easy to goober up the Lexan
      with glue, and it scratches too easily.
    • sctree
      Bruce, ... I agree they will look better rounded. Reddy is mostly square angles, so the rectangular window frames aren t so bad. ... Yes, they work like a
      Message 2 of 25 , Nov 2, 2003
        Bruce,

        >
        > I don't regret the rounded
        > corners, I like the way they
        > look, but it *was* extra work.

        I agree they will look better rounded. Reddy is mostly square angles, so
        the rectangular window frames aren't so bad.

        >
        > Also, I think that the rounding,
        > [would you call that filleting?]
        > also serves structurally with the
        > connections of the stiles and rails,
        > and that is probably the reason that
        > the PB&F plans show them.

        Yes, they work like a gusset. Much stronger frame corners, and I'd guess
        the rounded corner of the pane is stronger than a 90 degree corner...

        >
        > > My intent is to fit the panes before
        > > assembling the final stile, then
        > > fitting the whole mess to the cabin.
        >
        > How will you connect the last joint?
        > I found it easy to goober up the Lexan
        > with glue, and it scratches too easily.

        My current idea is the rails and stiles connected with half lap joints.
        On the benchtop epoxy three sides together with the fourth dry fitted to
        maintain shape. Next day slide in the pane with flexible goop in the
        slots, epoxy on the fourth. Later bed and screw the whole thing to the
        cabin, like when a house gets new windows....

        What I'll actually do, who knows? I'm open to suggestions.

        Last two goes at this sort of thing I left the paper on the panes until
        very close to launching day.

        Rick

        >
        >
      • Bruce Hallman
        ... In my case, dealing *neatly* with the goop, [siliconized caulk] was *not* easy. I predict that sliding the windows down a slot, will be messy, and will
        Message 3 of 25 , Nov 2, 2003
          --- sctree wrote:
          > slide in the pane with
          > flexible goop in the slots,

          In my case, dealing *neatly*
          with the goop, [siliconized
          caulk] was *not* easy.
          I predict that sliding the
          windows down a slot, will
          be messy, and will push
          the goop out when you want
          to keep the goop in.

          I recommend lots and lots
          of masking tape, plus maybe
          you should experiment some
          first. I found that making
          about a hundred 'single use'
          "V" scraper tools out of
          thin cardboard worked to lift
          and clean the over-gooped
          caulking. Each was used for
          about four inches, and then
          discarded.

          You might also want to consider
          a more conventional window
          glazing detail, where you use
          a trim piece instead of a slot.
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