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Re: [bolger] Pilothouse windows [was Bow Shed]

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  • sctree
    ... Been there, done that. ... Luckily I have squared corners. ... My intent is to fit the panes before assembling the final stile, then fitting the whole mess
    Message 1 of 25 , Nov 1, 2003
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      Bruce Hallman wrote:

      > --- sctree wrote:
      > > Still thinking about some
      > > camber, with deep
      > > routered slots
      >
      > I looked again critically at my
      > cambered windows, and I did more
      > like 1" in 36", and the camber
      > definitely helps a lot with the wobble.
      > The deflections that are visible, are
      > localized where I screwed [overscrewed]

      Been there, done that.

      >
      > the lexan to the molding strips.
      >
      > One thing to consider, on the PB&F
      > plans, the window openings have
      > rounded corners.

      Luckily I have squared corners.

      > I found that the
      > job of stem bending the molding
      > strips to be a 'learning experience'
      > to say the least. Routing the channel
      > might work better, but fitting the
      > lexan in routed slots seems tough.

      My intent is to fit the panes before assembling the final stile, then
      fitting the whole mess to the cabin.

      >
      >
      > > Hey Bruce, how about towing the
      > > Navigator out to the
      > > November Messabout in Stockton????
      >
      > There is no way my Navigator will be
      > ready by Nov 29th, but my S.O. and I
      > may come with Teal, tent & sleeping bags.

      Cool, another Bolger boat. Plan on Windmill Cove Marina, the 29th. I
      hope to be there the night before, and maybe the night after with
      Microtrawler. Maybe Pointy Skiff. Details to follow in a few days......

      Rick

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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Bruce Hallman
      ... I don t regret the rounded corners, I like the way they look, but it *was* extra work. Also, I think that the rounding, [would you call that filleting?]
      Message 2 of 25 , Nov 2, 2003
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        --- sctree wrote:
        > > rounded corners.
        >
        > Luckily I have squared corners.

        I don't regret the rounded
        corners, I like the way they
        look, but it *was* extra work.
        Also, I think that the rounding,
        [would you call that filleting?]
        also serves structurally with the
        connections of the stiles and rails,
        and that is probably the reason that
        the PB&F plans show them.

        > My intent is to fit the panes before
        > assembling the final stile, then
        > fitting the whole mess to the cabin.

        How will you connect the last joint?
        I found it easy to goober up the Lexan
        with glue, and it scratches too easily.
      • sctree
        Bruce, ... I agree they will look better rounded. Reddy is mostly square angles, so the rectangular window frames aren t so bad. ... Yes, they work like a
        Message 3 of 25 , Nov 2, 2003
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          Bruce,

          >
          > I don't regret the rounded
          > corners, I like the way they
          > look, but it *was* extra work.

          I agree they will look better rounded. Reddy is mostly square angles, so
          the rectangular window frames aren't so bad.

          >
          > Also, I think that the rounding,
          > [would you call that filleting?]
          > also serves structurally with the
          > connections of the stiles and rails,
          > and that is probably the reason that
          > the PB&F plans show them.

          Yes, they work like a gusset. Much stronger frame corners, and I'd guess
          the rounded corner of the pane is stronger than a 90 degree corner...

          >
          > > My intent is to fit the panes before
          > > assembling the final stile, then
          > > fitting the whole mess to the cabin.
          >
          > How will you connect the last joint?
          > I found it easy to goober up the Lexan
          > with glue, and it scratches too easily.

          My current idea is the rails and stiles connected with half lap joints.
          On the benchtop epoxy three sides together with the fourth dry fitted to
          maintain shape. Next day slide in the pane with flexible goop in the
          slots, epoxy on the fourth. Later bed and screw the whole thing to the
          cabin, like when a house gets new windows....

          What I'll actually do, who knows? I'm open to suggestions.

          Last two goes at this sort of thing I left the paper on the panes until
          very close to launching day.

          Rick

          >
          >
        • Bruce Hallman
          ... In my case, dealing *neatly* with the goop, [siliconized caulk] was *not* easy. I predict that sliding the windows down a slot, will be messy, and will
          Message 4 of 25 , Nov 2, 2003
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            --- sctree wrote:
            > slide in the pane with
            > flexible goop in the slots,

            In my case, dealing *neatly*
            with the goop, [siliconized
            caulk] was *not* easy.
            I predict that sliding the
            windows down a slot, will
            be messy, and will push
            the goop out when you want
            to keep the goop in.

            I recommend lots and lots
            of masking tape, plus maybe
            you should experiment some
            first. I found that making
            about a hundred 'single use'
            "V" scraper tools out of
            thin cardboard worked to lift
            and clean the over-gooped
            caulking. Each was used for
            about four inches, and then
            discarded.

            You might also want to consider
            a more conventional window
            glazing detail, where you use
            a trim piece instead of a slot.
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