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Re: filleting materials

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  • Bruce Hallman
    ... A year ago I used the el cheapo painter s caulk to fill gaps between deck beams and the plywood deck on portions of my Micro Navigator. [It saved me the
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 1, 2003
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      --- Lincoln Ross wrote:
      >... caulk ... I would consider that
      > approximately equivalent to ... air

      A year ago I used the el cheapo
      painter's caulk to fill gaps between
      deck beams and the plywood deck
      on portions of my Micro Navigator.
      [It saved me the trouble of cutting
      and fitting wood shims.]

      I just tested the caulk, [poked it
      with a screw driver]. The year
      old hardened caulk is about the
      same as you would expect with
      hardened Plaster of Paris. You
      can scratch it, but it is tight.

      I dare say, it resists scratches and
      chips better than the adjacent wood.

      I agree epoxy is better, but how
      much does 'better' help, if it is
      attached to wood?

      Caulk is stronger than air.
    • Lincoln Ross
      If I was filleting with caulk instead of epoxy I would consider that approximately equivalent to filleting with air, so I d use extra layers of glass to make
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 1, 2003
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        If I was filleting with caulk instead of epoxy I would consider that
        approximately equivalent to filleting with air, so I'd use extra layers
        of glass to make sure the fillet didn't buckle. Seems to me a stronger
        fillet material would be worthwhile. I don't know how strong the fillet
        material needs to be but my intuition says a certain number of
        microballoons could be used to make things cheaper and lighter without
        seam failure.
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