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Re: glass schedule

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  • Bob Chamberland
    As a postscript to this wise advice I would suggest that a lot of questions are answered by reading the directions on the can so to speak. Bob Chamberland
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 31, 2003
      As a postscript to this wise advice I would suggest that a lot of
      questions are answered by "reading the directions on the can" so to speak.
      Bob Chamberland

      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Peter Lenihan" <lestat@b...> wrote:
      > Perhaps it would not be a bad idea to perhaps mention that my
      > particular approach,at present,regarding the application of glass
      > fibers is guided by the designers instructions regarding his
      > WINDERMERE design.The heaviest build up of glass is all concentrated
      > on the bottom structures.To wit; 1 layer of 10oz glass UNDER the
      > shoe,followed by 3 layers of 10oz glass over the shoe,fillet
      > pieces,box-keel and hull bottom.The box-keel proper has an additional
      > layer of 10oz glass extending 16 feet back from the stem.
      > The topsides,roof top etc...get but a single layer of glass.
      > Certainly it can be expected that some prefer less glass while others
      > might suggest more. Being nothing more then a lazy boat bum who
      > happens to love lots of cold beer, I am compelled to stick with my
      > Heros specs if only for the sake of a good nights sleep :-)
      > I also whole heartedly encourage other amateur builders to follow the
      > scantlings and schedules called out for by their designer since I
      > believe this leads to much less grief over the long haul.
      >
      > Happy building to all:-)
      >
      > Sincerely,
      >
      > Peter Lenihan,about to take a late night stroll in the hope of seeing
      > some vivid displays of the Northern lights thanks to our burping
      > solar furnace,Mr Sun.
    • Nels
      ... speak. ... Although I agree to that advice - for some of us - the can doesn t have much in the way of directions. Here is the entire set of directions
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 31, 2003
        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bob Chamberland" <cha62759@t...>
        wrote:
        > As a postscript to this wise advice I would suggest that a lot of
        > questions are answered by "reading the directions on the can" so to
        speak.
        > Bob Chamberland

        Although I agree to that advice - for some of us - "the can" doesn't
        have much in the way of directions.

        Here is the entire set of directions from my can. (Plan)

        "General: All plywood is intended to be from 3/8" X 4' X 8'. May be
        thicker up to 1/2" for greater resistance to local impact and
        generally more solid sensation, traded agains added cost, increased
        trailer weight, and (probably slight) reduction in performance.

        Natural wood can be any species having good gluing properties.
        Relatively soft, flexible types, spruce, fir or cedar are preferable
        to hard and stiff woods except where "hard" is specified. Fastenings
        can be screws or ring nails mostly 1" long. External fiberglass
        sheathing typically one layer of 10 oz. cloth, is recommended for
        ease of finish and maintenance. It is not needed for structural
        reasons."

        Certainly this is enough information, particularly when combined with
        a copy of the appropriate Payson book. But on the other hand, when
        some of these olders designs were drawn up - Payson was still
        recommending polyester resins!

        Seems perhaps the new designs may come with more written intructions
        by the sound of what Peter tells us. That is why a forum such as this
        is so valuable I would suggest.

        Thanks for all the advice!

        Cheers, Nels
      • Peter Lenihan
        ... lights ... of Mr.. ... Frank, Nope! We had a bit of cloud cover/haze and darned if I could get far enough away from the loom of the city lights.Wanted to
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 31, 2003
          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Bales" <fbales@l...> wrote:
          > Peter, my Canadian wife was outside tonight looking for northern
          lights
          > since the news said they might be visible this far south because
          of "Mr..
          > Sun," but she didn't see any. How about you? --Frank

          Frank,
          Nope! We had a bit of cloud cover/haze and darned if I could
          get far enough away from the loom of the city lights.Wanted to take a
          drive up North but my attorney told me to get my sorry a** back
          inside before she gives me some"Northern Lights"..........what a
          sport:-(


          Sincerely,
          Peter Lenihan,watching the rain clouds rolling back in after several
          hours absence...........
        • dnjost
          At 7:00 PM in Westborough, Massachusetts, the Northern Lights were simply fantastic!!! One of the most amazing events I have ever witnessed. At 8:00 PM it was
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 31, 2003
            At 7:00 PM in Westborough, Massachusetts, the Northern Lights were
            simply fantastic!!! One of the most amazing events I have ever
            witnessed. At 8:00 PM it was all but over.

            The lights were visible ENE.

            David Jost

            in the burbs of Boston.
          • Jack &Lois
            Northern Lights were trully spectacular from the shores of Fundy last night. Scarsely a blink of light pollution. They appeared to imminate from straight
            Message 5 of 9 , Oct 31, 2003
              Northern Lights were trully spectacular from the shores of Fundy last night. Scarsely a blink of light pollution. They appeared to imminate from straight overhead, like looking up inside a giant teepee. There was a period of red intensity to the east lasting 30 min. or so that was breath taking. Gotta love those sun spots.

              jeb, out standing in the middle of Russia Road in the dark, shouting "ENCORE! ENCORE!", above the crashing shores of Fundy

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • John Spoering
              Hi All - Hey, hey, you guys got me all excited and last noght I was out checking for those Northern Lights. But all I saw was the bottom of my glass of
              Message 6 of 9 , Nov 1, 2003
                Hi All -

                Hey, hey, you guys' got me all excited and last noght I was out checking for those Northern Lights. But all I saw was the bottom of my glass of Southern Comfort.

                Aloha - Jack Spoering - Ft Lauderdale, Florida

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • proaconstrictor
                It s certainly not true that the purpose of a fillet is solely to provide a curved surface for the glass. But if your engineering concept is that the boat you
                Message 7 of 9 , Nov 2, 2003
                  It's certainly not true that the purpose of a fillet is solely to
                  provide a curved surface for the glass. But if your engineering
                  concept is that the boat you are building would not require the
                  strength of the fillet (which can be enough by itself without any
                  glass), then just put the glass in without any fillet, that's
                  perfectly acceptable. It can be pre-molded over an abs pipe, for a
                  rounded chine effect, or scrunched hard to the inside corner, or let
                  hot flash and then tooled into the joint, or you can radius masking
                  tape and fire it over that. I don't see much harm in any caulk used
                  in the joint, it just seems like a possible contaminant, and extra
                  weight and expense.
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