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[bolger] Re: Home made anchor

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  • Samson family
    Hi, Here in the UK we have lots of sash windows that use cast iron counterweights - which are readily available at scrap yards. These are often used as
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 27, 2000
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      Hi,

      Here in the UK we have lots of sash windows that use cast iron
      counterweights - which are readily available at scrap yards. These are
      often used as anchors for little fishing boats - they get a good enough grip
      in the mud, and won't snag on anything.

      If you can't get a 'real' one it's simply a foot-long length of 2" dia steel
      with a hole in one end to tie the rope. No flukes or any complications.

      Of course they wouldn't be great in a strong stream, but for holding the
      boat while you picnic or fish - couldn't be more convenient.

      Bill
    • David Jost
      yup! Sash weights work well as flouder pounders get a bag of crushed clams in an old onion sack, and bang that sash weight on the bottom for a little bit
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 27, 2000
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        yup! Sash weights work well as "flouder pounders" get a bag of
        crushed clams in an old onion sack, and bang that sash weight on the
        bottom for a little bit to stir up the mud. It is like a dinner bell
        for sleeping flounder.
        Tie three of em together with clothesline or whatever and you have a
        suitable small boat anchor (temporary). I use one to mark my mooring
        location while we put in the 150lb mushroom during servicing.
        David Jost
        "epoxy weather in Boston" :-)

        "samson family" <bill.samso-@...> wrote:
        original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger/?start=3202
        > Hi,
        >
        > Here in the UK we have lots of sash windows that use cast iron
        > counterweights - which are readily available at scrap yards. These
        are
        > often used as anchors for little fishing boats - they get a good
        enough grip
        > in the mud, and won't snag on anything.
        >
        > If you can't get a 'real' one it's simply a foot-long length of 2"
        dia steel
        > with a hole in one end to tie the rope. No flukes or any
        complications.
        >
        > Of course they wouldn't be great in a strong stream, but for holding
        the
        > boat while you picnic or fish - couldn't be more convenient.
        >
        > Bill
        >
      • Gordon Couger
        My dad always used a peice of 1.5 inch steel shaft with some light rebar welded on one end in the form of an X and a loop on the other to tie the ancor line
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 27, 2000
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          My dad always used a peice of 1.5 inch steel shaft with
          some light rebar welded on one end in the form of an X
          and a loop on the other to tie the ancor line to.

          He could hit the end of the nylon ancor line and bend the
          rebar and get the ancor back out of the rocks.

          Gordon W5RED

          G. C. Couger gcouger@... Stillwater, OK
          www.couger.com/gcouger
          "You miss 100 percent of the shots you never take." - Wayne Gretzky



          ----- Original Message -----
          From: <Shorty@...>
          To: <bolger@egroups.com>
          Sent: Sunday, February 27, 2000 11:52 PM
          Subject: [bolger] Re: Home made anchor


          > Tough decision on which anchor to go with. Leaning towards the
          > brick-on-a-string...
          >
          > Was hoping there was a design for a grapple or danforth made from
          > galvanized angle iron & 1/4" bolts, but the bricks should suffice.
          >
          > Thanks for all your suggestions.
          >
          > David Routh
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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        • Shorty@ShortyPen.com
          Tough decision on which anchor to go with. Leaning towards the brick-on-a-string... Was hoping there was a design for a grapple or danforth made from
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 27, 2000
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            Tough decision on which anchor to go with. Leaning towards the
            brick-on-a-string...

            Was hoping there was a design for a grapple or danforth made from
            galvanized angle iron & 1/4" bolts, but the bricks should suffice.

            Thanks for all your suggestions.

            David Routh
          • Stepehn F. Heil
            I ve seen old brake drums from cars uses quite effectively. short-@shortypen.com wrote: original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger/?start=3217
            Message 5 of 8 , Feb 28, 2000
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              I've seen old brake drums from cars uses quite effectively.

              short-@... wrote:
              original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger/?start=3217
              > Tough decision on which anchor to go with. Leaning towards the
              > brick-on-a-string...
              >
              > Was hoping there was a design for a grapple or danforth made from
              > galvanized angle iron & 1/4" bolts, but the bricks should suffice.
              >
              > Thanks for all your suggestions.
              >
              > David Routh
              >
            • Peter Vanderwaart
              I wrote out a longish comment about homemade anchors last night, but it seems to have disappeared into the bit bucket. (that s where computer data goes when
              Message 6 of 8 , Feb 29, 2000
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                I wrote out a longish comment about homemade anchors last night, but it
                seems to have disappeared into the bit bucket. (that's where computer
                data goes when you hit 'Delete'.) So, pardon me if this is a repeat.

                The substance of my remarks was that, according to the West catalog,
                you can buy a 8 lb Hooker "quick set" economy anchor for $13. It will
                probably work at least as well as a home made anchor, and better than a
                rock. How much do you expect to save?

                Peter
              • Foster Price
                Hello All Peter Wrote: The substance of my remarks was that, according to the West catalog, you can buy a 8 lb Hooker quick set economy anchor for $13. It
                Message 7 of 8 , Feb 29, 2000
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                  Hello All

                  Peter Wrote:
                  "The substance of my remarks was that, according to the West catalog,
                  you can buy a 8 lb Hooker "quick set" economy anchor for $13. It will
                  probably work at least as well as a home made anchor, and better than a
                  rock. How much do you expect to save?"

                  Since this interesting thread seems to be dying I'll add my 2cents worth. I recently built a grapnel anchor for nothing. I was on New Zealands remote Stewart Island, with my boat. We wanted to fish over rocky reefs but I didn't want to risk losing the big CQR anchor. A grapnel can be made so it will "pull straight" and come free.

                  The only garage/motorshop on the island was busy but said I could raid their scrap pile and use their workshop as long as I didn't get in their way. In the scrap pile was some 10mm (3/8") rebar 750 mm (2' 6") long and water pipe about 45mm - (1 3/4") diameter, 250 mm - (10") long. A design came to mind from something I'd read in the past.

                  The rebar was bent into two "U"s of about with the legs close enough together to drive right though the water pipe. The top of the "U"s are driven down to form an eye for the rode.

                  Bend the other ends (now sticking out of the other end of the water pipe) back to form the prongs of the grapnel and cut them to an even length. A refinement is to preen the ends of the pipe to ensure the rebar can't turn inside the pipe.

                  This grapnel has a good heft to it due to the weight of the water pipe and works better than the cast folding or welded ones due to this weight. You only need some scrap, a hacksaw, hammer and vice to build it.

                  It works well over rocky bottoms, in kelp or other areas where plow/fisherman/danforth anchors foul.

                  Regards - Foster
                  Southland, New Zealand
                • Shorty@ShortyPen.com
                  ... found a picture of one: http://www.boatparts.net/anchors.htm This is what I was looking for! Didn t know it existed. Right price, right size... Thanks!
                  Message 8 of 8 , Feb 29, 2000
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                    "Peter Vanderwaart" <pvanderw@...> wrote:
                    > you can buy a 8 lb Hooker "quick set" economy anchor for $13.
                    >

                    found a picture of one:
                    http://www.boatparts.net/anchors.htm
                    This is what I was looking for!
                    Didn't know it existed. Right price, right size...

                    Thanks!
                    David Routh
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