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sputtering 4 strokes

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  • Richard Spelling
    My new Nissan 6hp four stroke has developed a stutter. I m 90% sure it s water in the gas, as replacing the fuel and draining the carb cleared it up. However,
    Message 1 of 20 , Sep 4, 2003
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      My new Nissan 6hp four stroke has developed a stutter.

      I'm 90% sure it's water in the gas, as replacing the fuel and draining the carb cleared it up.

      However, it's developed it again.

      So, my thoughts:

      1) buy one of those good water/fuel separators, with the bowl and drain
      2) buy one of those water/fuel separators with the disposible canisters (how long would one of those last, btw?)
      3) go to an auto parts store, buy some "water remover", and mix it with the gas.

      Thoughts? Comments?

      Chebacco Richard - http://www.chebacco.com http://www.richardspelling.com


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Richard Spelling
      oh, ya, and can I use a diesel separator w/gas? ... From: Richard Spelling To: bolger@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, September 04, 2003 9:54 AM Subject:
      Message 2 of 20 , Sep 4, 2003
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        oh, ya, and can I use a diesel separator w/gas?
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Richard Spelling
        To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, September 04, 2003 9:54 AM
        Subject: [bolger] sputtering 4 strokes


        My new Nissan 6hp four stroke has developed a stutter.

        I'm 90% sure it's water in the gas, as replacing the fuel and draining the carb cleared it up.

        However, it's developed it again.

        So, my thoughts:

        1) buy one of those good water/fuel separators, with the bowl and drain
        2) buy one of those water/fuel separators with the disposible canisters (how long would one of those last, btw?)
        3) go to an auto parts store, buy some "water remover", and mix it with the gas.

        Thoughts? Comments?

        Chebacco Richard - http://www.chebacco.com http://www.richardspelling.com


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



        Bolger rules!!!
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        - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Hal Lynch
        ... 2 things. My boat with a V8 engine has a disposable fuel filter/separator. I replace it every year when I winterize whether it needs it or not. In a good
        Message 3 of 20 , Sep 4, 2003
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          On Thursday, September 4, 2003, at 08:54 AM, Richard Spelling wrote:

          > I'm 90% sure it's water in the gas, as replacing the fuel and draining
          > the carb cleared it up.

          > 2) buy one of those water/fuel separators with the disposible
          > canisters (how long would one of those last, btw?)

          2 things.

          My boat with a V8 engine has a disposable fuel filter/separator.
          I replace it every year when I winterize whether it needs it or not.
          In a good year I run about 200 gallons of gas through it. That is
          much more than you will. Cheap insurance.

          Have you figured out how the water is getting into the gas?
          Prevention is as good as a cure.

          A filter/separator is a good idea in any event.

          hal
        • Richard Spelling
          About what I figured, get the cheapest canister separator I can find, replace filters every year. I run about 3 gallons a year.... :) I m assuming
          Message 4 of 20 , Sep 4, 2003
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            About what I figured, get the cheapest canister separator I can find, replace filters every year. I run about 3 gallons a year.... :)

            I'm assuming condensation, though possibly it's going in the vent hole on the cap. I did have a cover on that at one time, will put that back on as well.
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Hal Lynch
            To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, September 04, 2003 10:24 AM
            Subject: Re: [bolger] sputtering 4 strokes



            On Thursday, September 4, 2003, at 08:54 AM, Richard Spelling wrote:

            > I'm 90% sure it's water in the gas, as replacing the fuel and draining
            > the carb cleared it up.

            > 2) buy one of those water/fuel separators with the disposible
            > canisters (how long would one of those last, btw?)

            2 things.

            My boat with a V8 engine has a disposable fuel filter/separator.
            I replace it every year when I winterize whether it needs it or not.
            In a good year I run about 200 gallons of gas through it. That is
            much more than you will. Cheap insurance.

            Have you figured out how the water is getting into the gas?
            Prevention is as good as a cure.

            A filter/separator is a good idea in any event.

            hal



            Bolger rules!!!
            - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
            - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
            - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
            - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
            - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Roger Derby
            After some twenty years of draining my Cessna s tanks to take out the water, I ve about decided that condensation is an old wive s tale to cover up the bad
            Message 5 of 20 , Sep 4, 2003
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              After some twenty years of draining my Cessna's tanks to take out the water,
              I've about decided that "condensation" is an old wive's tale to cover up the
              bad storage tanks of the FBO (gasoline vendor). I tried to run the numbers,
              but they're very hard to get; e.g. the expansion coefficient of gasoline
              which is supposedly pumping in moist air as the temperature changes.
              Anyway, the only time I get significant water is when the bird's been parked
              out in the rain. As long as it's under cover, no water is found.

              I suspect the shape of the filler neck around the caps, but the point is
              that significant amounts don't come out of thin air. (pun)

              If there's a convenient place to mount one of the "gascolators" with the
              glass bowl, that would be my choice. It will leak or spill eventually, so
              that leakage must go overboard and not into the bilges.

              Roger
              derbyrm@...
              http://derbyrm.mystarband.net

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Richard Spelling" <richard@...>

              > I'm assuming condensation, though possibly it's going
              > in the vent hole on the cap. I did have a cover on that
              > at one time, will put that back on as well.
              >
              > > I'm 90% sure it's water in the gas, as replacing the
              > > fuel and draining the carb cleared it up.
            • Hal Lynch
              ... Well there is your problem?! If you ran a lot more gas through the tank significant quantities of water couldn t accumulate. :^) ... Top off the tank with
              Message 6 of 20 , Sep 4, 2003
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                On Thursday, September 4, 2003, at 09:31 AM, Richard Spelling wrote:

                > I run about 3 gallons a year.... :)

                Well there is your problem?! If you ran a lot more gas
                through the tank significant quantities of water couldn't
                accumulate. :^)

                > I'm assuming condensation, though possibly it's going in the vent hole
                > on the cap. I did have a cover on that at one time, will put that back
                > on as well.

                Top off the tank with a few tablespoons of gas after every use. Keeping
                the tank full will help the condensation problem a lot.

                hal
              • pvanderwaart
                ... The environmental police, USCG included, would not like this solution. Peter
                Message 7 of 20 , Sep 4, 2003
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                  > It will leak or spill eventually, so
                  > that leakage must go overboard...

                  The environmental police, USCG included, would not like this solution.

                  Peter
                • jmbell1
                  I d be careful with a fuel dryer you pour in you gas tank because they may contain alcohol. My Merc 4 stroke owners manual has some pretty stern language
                  Message 8 of 20 , Sep 4, 2003
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                    I'd be careful with a fuel dryer you pour in you gas tank because
                    they may contain alcohol. My Merc 4 stroke owners manual has some
                    pretty stern language against putting any alcohol (ethanol
                    specifically) through the motor.

                    If you are getting water in your gas, it's usually pretty easy to see
                    it blobbing around the bottom of the tank. Keeping the fuel vent shut
                    when not actually using the motor will cut down on most of the water
                    getting into your tank. It comes in as the tank breathes during
                    temperature changes.

                    I'd also change out the fuel filter before resorting to other extreme
                    measures. There should be one under the motor shroud somewhere.

                    Also, you motor was new wasn't it? This is a good time to exercise
                    your rights under warranty.

                    Good luck.
                    --
                  • Bruce Hallman
                    ... Is it possible to row, or scull, in a Chebacco? PCB wrote about the simplicity of rowing in _Small Boats_ long ago, [pasted below]... = = = = = = = = = =
                    Message 9 of 20 , Sep 4, 2003
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                      --- Richard Spelling wrote:
                      > I run about 3 gallons a year.... :)

                      Is it possible to row,
                      or scull, in a Chebacco?

                      PCB wrote about the 'simplicity'
                      of rowing in _Small Boats_ long
                      ago, [pasted below]...

                      =
                      =
                      =
                      =
                      =
                      =
                      =
                      =
                      =
                      =

                      Bolger: ON ROWING [excerpt, Ch 7, Small Boats 1973]

                      Twenty years or so ago the National Geographic Society
                      sponsored an expedition to investigate a meteor crater
                      down back of beyond in Labrador. The crater lake was
                      to be sounded, so they took along a canoe, and,
                      naturally, an outboard motor to drive the canoe. How
                      else? That motor was flown at fabulous expense to the
                      vicinity, and packed miles across nightmarish boulder
                      terrain and down the precipitous wall of the crater
                      with hardship and hazard complained of in the official
                      account of the expedition. After arriving at the
                      water�s edge, I suppose they spent a half hour hooking
                      it up and pulling on the starting cord before they
                      sputtered bravely out to the middle of the lake, which
                      was all of a mile and a half in diameter, took their
                      soundings, and proceeded to reverse the whole process
                      till the motor arrived in good order back in Montreal.
                      Being careful men, I expect that they also took some
                      paddles along in case the motor broke down.

                      Apart from illustrating that well-regarded scientists
                      don't necessarily have any sense, this piece of lunacy
                      is only an exaggerated example of a very common
                      tendency. There are actually thousands of people using
                      motors (and sails, for that matter) to do jobs that
                      could be done quicker and easier, to say nothing of
                      cheaper, with oars. Almost while I was writing this I
                      saw a television ad for an electric outboard motor,
                      guaranteed not to wake up your neighbors when you go
                      fishing early in the morning; the thought is
                      appreciated, but anybody could row the boat faster and
                      farther, still in silence, than that motor could drive
                      it.

                      I'm a great admirer of modern outboard motors, I
                      should say; I've owned several and used them a lot,
                      but the way some people use them is like trying to do
                      your shopping by airplane when the market is in
                      walking distance, not because you like flying so much,
                      but because you don't realize that it�s possible to
                      walk. Even disregarding cost, it�s folly to insist on
                      a motor for very short distances because the trouble
                      of bringing the motor to the starting point is out of
                      all proportion to any that it saves when ready. Motors
                      enable a boat to make headway against swift streams or
                      gale winds, or to cover a long distance quickly, or to
                      keep very heavy loads moving reliably; they're not
                      needed or efficient for short distances, light loads,
                      and pleasant weather, and in particular they're not
                      sensible when the thing sought is recreation for a
                      given time, rather than arrival over a certain
                      distance.
                    • Richard Spelling
                      Theoreticaly. However, I bet you d only do it once. ... From: Bruce Hallman To: bolger@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, September 04, 2003 12:48 PM Subject:
                      Message 10 of 20 , Sep 4, 2003
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                        Theoreticaly. However, I bet you'd only do it once.
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: Bruce Hallman
                        To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Thursday, September 04, 2003 12:48 PM
                        Subject: [bolger] Re: sputtering 4 strokes


                        --- Richard Spelling wrote:
                        > I run about 3 gallons a year.... :)

                        Is it possible to row,
                        or scull, in a Chebacco?

                        PCB wrote about the 'simplicity'
                        of rowing in _Small Boats_ long
                        ago, [pasted below]...

                        =
                        =
                        =
                        =
                        =
                        =
                        =
                        =
                        =
                        =

                        Bolger: ON ROWING [excerpt, Ch 7, Small Boats 1973]

                        Twenty years or so ago the National Geographic Society
                        sponsored an expedition to investigate a meteor crater
                        down back of beyond in Labrador. The crater lake was
                        to be sounded, so they took along a canoe, and,
                        naturally, an outboard motor to drive the canoe. How
                        else? That motor was flown at fabulous expense to the
                        vicinity, and packed miles across nightmarish boulder
                        terrain and down the precipitous wall of the crater
                        with hardship and hazard complained of in the official
                        account of the expedition. After arriving at the
                        water's edge, I suppose they spent a half hour hooking
                        it up and pulling on the starting cord before they
                        sputtered bravely out to the middle of the lake, which
                        was all of a mile and a half in diameter, took their
                        soundings, and proceeded to reverse the whole process
                        till the motor arrived in good order back in Montreal.
                        Being careful men, I expect that they also took some
                        paddles along in case the motor broke down.

                        Apart from illustrating that well-regarded scientists
                        don't necessarily have any sense, this piece of lunacy
                        is only an exaggerated example of a very common
                        tendency. There are actually thousands of people using
                        motors (and sails, for that matter) to do jobs that
                        could be done quicker and easier, to say nothing of
                        cheaper, with oars. Almost while I was writing this I
                        saw a television ad for an electric outboard motor,
                        guaranteed not to wake up your neighbors when you go
                        fishing early in the morning; the thought is
                        appreciated, but anybody could row the boat faster and
                        farther, still in silence, than that motor could drive
                        it.

                        I'm a great admirer of modern outboard motors, I
                        should say; I've owned several and used them a lot,
                        but the way some people use them is like trying to do
                        your shopping by airplane when the market is in
                        walking distance, not because you like flying so much,
                        but because you don't realize that it's possible to
                        walk. Even disregarding cost, it's folly to insist on
                        a motor for very short distances because the trouble
                        of bringing the motor to the starting point is out of
                        all proportion to any that it saves when ready. Motors
                        enable a boat to make headway against swift streams or
                        gale winds, or to cover a long distance quickly, or to
                        keep very heavy loads moving reliably; they're not
                        needed or efficient for short distances, light loads,
                        and pleasant weather, and in particular they're not
                        sensible when the thing sought is recreation for a
                        given time, rather than arrival over a certain
                        distance.



                        Bolger rules!!!
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                        - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
                        - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
                        - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
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                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Roger Derby
                        I didn t want this discussion, but I must point out that a burning boat pollutes significantly more that a few ounces of gas once a year. I m not suggesting
                        Message 11 of 20 , Sep 4, 2003
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                          I didn't want this discussion, but I must point out that a burning boat
                          pollutes significantly more that a few ounces of gas once a year. I'm not
                          suggesting unrestricted, routine, draining; just precautions equivalent to
                          the use of updraft carburetors and bilge blowers.

                          Roger
                          derbyrm@...
                          http://derbyrm.mystarband.net

                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: "pvanderwaart" <pvanderw@...>

                          >
                          > > It will leak or spill eventually, so
                          > > that leakage must go overboard...
                          >
                          > The environmental police, USCG included, would
                          > not like this solution.
                          >
                          > Peter
                        • Bruce Hallman
                          ... Just curious, what does PCB say about this, on the plans, or do the plan notes mention rowing, or sculling? And/or what did he write about the motor?
                          Message 12 of 20 , Sep 4, 2003
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                            --- Richard Spelling wrote:
                            > Theoreticaly. However, I bet you'd only do it once.

                            Just curious, what does PCB say about this,
                            on the plans, or do the plan notes mention rowing,
                            or sculling? And/or what did he write about
                            the motor? [not having ever seen Chebacco plans]

                            BTW, how many sheets in a Chebacco set, and
                            what do they cost?

                            I bet in the third world, many boats bigger
                            than this get sculled or rowed. If all you
                            had to do was manuever to the dock, or whatever,
                            maybe....

                            How is Chebacco in light winds?
                          • Richard Spelling
                            From SA s writeup on the cruising version: Finally, the house top has those two hatches, two handholds, but could also have fishing rod and boat-hook holders,
                            Message 13 of 20 , Sep 4, 2003
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                              From SA's writeup on the cruising version:
                              "Finally, the house top has those two hatches, two handholds, but could also have fishing rod and boat-hook holders, with over lengths extending ahead of the house without 'poking your eye out'. Indeed a couple of sweeps could be carried for a rowing geometry of your devising - should you have the urge. "

                              They do fine in light airs. Mine not so well as the lighter daysailers, but not two bad.

                              You can get the plans for the sheet ply version from Payson for $60.

                              About $300 for the plans from PCB&F, but they include "all versions".

                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: Bruce Hallman
                              To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Thursday, September 04, 2003 1:09 PM
                              Subject: Re: [bolger] Re: sputtering 4 strokes


                              --- Richard Spelling wrote:
                              > Theoreticaly. However, I bet you'd only do it once.

                              Just curious, what does PCB say about this,
                              on the plans, or do the plan notes mention rowing,
                              or sculling? And/or what did he write about
                              the motor? [not having ever seen Chebacco plans]

                              BTW, how many sheets in a Chebacco set, and
                              what do they cost?

                              I bet in the third world, many boats bigger
                              than this get sculled or rowed. If all you
                              had to do was manuever to the dock, or whatever,
                              maybe....

                              How is Chebacco in light winds?



                              Bolger rules!!!
                              - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
                              - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
                              - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
                              - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
                              - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                              - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

                              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Richard Spelling
                              Well, the Chebacco has a nice motor well in the back, the perfect place to mount a filter. Now, if I could just find one that I didn t have to mortgage the
                              Message 14 of 20 , Sep 4, 2003
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                                Well, the Chebacco has a nice motor well in the back, the perfect place to mount a filter. Now, if I could just find one that I didn't have to mortgage the house to buy.
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                From: Roger Derby
                                To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Thursday, September 04, 2003 1:04 PM
                                Subject: Re: [bolger] Re: sputtering 4 strokes


                                I didn't want this discussion, but I must point out that a burning boat
                                pollutes significantly more that a few ounces of gas once a year. I'm not
                                suggesting unrestricted, routine, draining; just precautions equivalent to
                                the use of updraft carburetors and bilge blowers.

                                Roger
                                derbyrm@...
                                http://derbyrm.mystarband.net

                                ----- Original Message -----
                                From: "pvanderwaart" <pvanderw@...>

                                >
                                > > It will leak or spill eventually, so
                                > > that leakage must go overboard...
                                >
                                > The environmental police, USCG included, would
                                > not like this solution.
                                >
                                > Peter




                                Bolger rules!!!
                                - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
                                - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
                                - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
                                - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
                                - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                                - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

                                Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • pvanderwaart
                                ... boat ... I m not ... equivalent to ... Understood. Agreed. Peter
                                Message 15 of 20 , Sep 4, 2003
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                                  > I didn't want this discussion, but I must point out that a burning
                                  boat
                                  > pollutes significantly more that a few ounces of gas once a year.
                                  I'm not
                                  > suggesting unrestricted, routine, draining; just precautions
                                  equivalent to
                                  > the use of updraft carburetors and bilge blowers.

                                  Understood. Agreed.

                                  Peter
                                • Richard Spelling
                                  They all contain alchohol, either isopropanol or methanol. Ethanol is drinking alchohol. In all cases, you shouldn t try to burn pure alchohol, it eats the
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Sep 4, 2003
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                                    They all contain alchohol, either isopropanol or methanol. Ethanol is drinking alchohol. In all cases, you shouldn't try to burn pure alchohol, it eats the seals.

                                    The $10 a pint stuff at West Marine is methanol. So is the $1.19 a pint stuff at AutoZone...

                                    Looked at the owners manual, no mention of forbidding fuel dryers.

                                    Extensive searching, no mention of problems with fuel dryers and outboards.

                                    Lots of mention of the use cheap 87 octane fuel causing carbon deposits that ruin aluminum engines, though....

                                    Guess I should start buying premium... for the mower, too, me thinks.

                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    From: jmbell1
                                    To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Thursday, September 04, 2003 12:34 PM
                                    Subject: [bolger] Re: sputtering 4 strokes


                                    I'd be careful with a fuel dryer you pour in you gas tank because
                                    they may contain alcohol. My Merc 4 stroke owners manual has some
                                    pretty stern language against putting any alcohol (ethanol
                                    specifically) through the motor.

                                    If you are getting water in your gas, it's usually pretty easy to see
                                    it blobbing around the bottom of the tank. Keeping the fuel vent shut
                                    when not actually using the motor will cut down on most of the water
                                    getting into your tank. It comes in as the tank breathes during
                                    temperature changes.

                                    I'd also change out the fuel filter before resorting to other extreme
                                    measures. There should be one under the motor shroud somewhere.

                                    Also, you motor was new wasn't it? This is a good time to exercise
                                    your rights under warranty.

                                    Good luck.
                                    --





                                    Bolger rules!!!
                                    - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
                                    - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
                                    - Pls add your comments at the TOP, SIGN your posts, and snip away
                                    - Plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
                                    - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                                    - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

                                    Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • welshman@ptialaska.net
                                    I have mentioned this before on the group, always use an in place mounted fuel filter, perferably with a glass bowl where you can see what is coming through. A
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Sep 4, 2003
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                                      I have mentioned this before on the group, always use an in place mounted
                                      fuel filter, perferably with a glass bowl where you can see what is coming
                                      through.

                                      A friend who sells and maintains outboards for a living in Nome told me
                                      that he figured 50% or better of all outboard problems he delt with were
                                      due to bad gas. Getting bad fuel is more likely in Western AK, but I would
                                      be prepared for it anywhere.

                                      HJ


                                      My new Nissan 6hp four stroke has developed a stutter.

                                      I'm 90% sure it's water in the gas, as replacing the fuel and draining the
                                      carb cleared it up.

                                      However, it's developed it again.

                                      So, my thoughts:

                                      1) buy one of those good water/fuel separators, with the bowl and drain
                                      2) buy one of those water/fuel separators with the disposible canisters
                                      (how long would one of those last, btw?)
                                      3) go to an auto parts store, buy some "water remover", and mix it with the
                                      gas.

                                      Thoughts? Comments?

                                      Cheba

                                      --------------------------------------------------------------------
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                                    • Hal Lynch
                                      ... A search of fuel filter at the following sites found the following water separating fuel filters. #21632 $22 and #27382 $30 at Overtons
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Sep 4, 2003
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                                        On Thursday, September 4, 2003, at 12:16 PM, Richard Spelling wrote:

                                        > Well, the Chebacco has a nice motor well in the back, the perfect
                                        > place to mount a filter. Now, if I could just find one that I didn't
                                        > have to mortgage the house to buy.

                                        A search of "fuel filter" at the following sites found
                                        the following water separating fuel filters.

                                        #21632 $22 and
                                        #27382 $30 at Overtons (www.overtons.com)

                                        #2160612 $32 at West Marine (www.westmarine.com)

                                        #358040194 $30 at Boaters World (www.boatersworld.com)

                                        You want the kind that looks like a remote oil filtter.
                                        Boaters World catalog# 358040194, is a good example.
                                        You don't need one that big but I didn't find any smaller.

                                        Cheap insurance.

                                        hal
                                      • vexatious2001
                                        ... deposits that ruin aluminum engines, though.... ... thinks. ... A lot of premium gas has alcohol, too. I would not worry too much about running regular
                                        Message 19 of 20 , Sep 4, 2003
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                                          > Lots of mention of the use cheap 87 octane fuel causing carbon
                                          deposits that ruin aluminum engines, though....
                                          >
                                          > Guess I should start buying premium... for the mower, too, me
                                          thinks.
                                          >




                                          A lot of "premium" gas has alcohol, too.

                                          I would not worry too much about running "regular"
                                          unleaded gas, but might add a dab of carbon
                                          remover every so often. A small bottle of the
                                          stuff would last you several years.

                                          I would get a tube of water-finding paste (the brand
                                          I have is "Kolor Kut"). This is the stuff gasoline
                                          stations use to check their tanks for water; put
                                          a dab of the brown stuff on a stick and "stick"
                                          the tank and if it turns purple, you have water.


                                          I check my tanks maybe twice a season and occasionlly
                                          find a bit of water before it has a chance to accumulate
                                          to the point where the engine is affected.


                                          Max
                                        • Ron Magen
                                          While my 199x vintage Evinrude Yachtwin is not a 4-stroke it is just as susceptible to gas contamination as any engine. I do a few simple procedures on a
                                          Message 20 of 20 , Sep 5, 2003
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                                            While my 199x vintage Evinrude 'Yachtwin' is not a '4-stroke' it is just
                                            as susceptible to 'gas contamination' as any engine. I do a few simple
                                            procedures on a regular basis and really have had no problems. In fact,
                                            I told another Potter owner to follow them and it cured HIS engine
                                            stalling problems . . . I once had to tow him in because the engine
                                            'died'.

                                            Mine has a 3 gal. 'remote' tank, while his had a smaller capacity
                                            'internal tank' so I know this works with both. Condensation can be a
                                            lot more than you realize; and the effect on the fuel a lot greater with
                                            even a small amount. I always add about a 'capful' of 'Store-N-Start'
                                            stabilizer to the tank on fill up. If I add more gas, I'll also add a
                                            bit more of the stabilizer. Supposedly, this stuff also has a 'dryer'
                                            component, but adding a occasional 'dash' of 'dollar store' stuff
                                            wouldn't hurt if you haven't used the gas in a long time. {ALL the
                                            'cheap stuff' is Methanol; the stuff that has Ethanol {or
                                            Isopropyl }WILL SAY SO on the 'components' list. In addition, I always
                                            make sure the carburetor bowl is EMPTY at the end of the day. I leave
                                            the engine on a fast idle, and disconnect the fuel line . . . AT THE
                                            TANK . . . and hang that end on the boom 'pigtail' so it drains the line
                                            and carb. No 'sludge', gum, or varnish build-up. Annually, I clean or
                                            replace the fuel filter in the engine, and inspect and/or replace the
                                            plugs. When the boat was 'slipped' we used an old 'car cover' for a boat
                                            cover, and kept the fuel container shaded and the vent closed. Now that
                                            she is on a mooring, and un-shaded, we leave it open . . . so the
                                            plastic tank doesn't 'flex' as much. STILL starts immediately, and
                                            hasn't stalled out yet.

                                            With the other guy's 3.5 motor . . . 1 - DUMP {properly, of course}the
                                            old fuel and FLUSH the tank well with fresh fuel. 2 - DRAIN & flush the
                                            carburetor 3 - CLEAN the internal fuel filter 4 - REFILL with FRESH
                                            fuel/ STABILIZER/oil mix & and run engine at mid throttle {or greater}
                                            for at least 30 minutes. After doing this, and following my 'normal'
                                            procedures, he had NO MORE stalling problems.

                                            On a '4-stroke' note, I had similar 'sputtering' problems with my old
                                            {1984}Toyota Pick-up, and also my 'new' 1995 Isuzu. The 'Toy' was very
                                            fuel efficient, and would go for weeks between fill-ups. It also sat in
                                            the drive more that it was on the road. A steel tank, in cool weather
                                            picks up a good amount of condensation. In addition, because the gas &
                                            water AREN'T mixed {THAT'S what the 'dryer' does}, the water
                                            ACCUMULATES. Even with the modern 'emission proof' non-vented tanks,
                                            this does happen. When I started to have a rough running engine, I would
                                            immediately added a couple of pints {of dryer}to the tank. By the way,
                                            those expensive 'Fuel Injector Cleaners' that suggest adding to each
                                            tank - they are basically ALCOHOL. I typically add a pint of Isopropyl
                                            dryer at least once a month, during the winter. Also, simply keeping the
                                            tank full reduces the tendency . . . I try not to let my fuel level get
                                            below 1/4 tank, at any season.

                                            Regards & Good Luck,
                                            Ron Magen
                                            Backyard Boatshop
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