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Sneakeasy "Katie" report

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  • Sal's Dad
    I just got back from a couple weeks away from the computer, and didn t see a notice from Steve saying that Katie , the Sneakeasy he built, has been sold,
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 3, 2003
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      I just got back from a couple weeks away from the computer, and didn't see a
      notice from Steve saying that "Katie", the Sneakeasy he built, has been
      sold, so...

      A couple weeks ago Steve Bosquette took my family out for a test ride in
      Katie, in Bath, Maine. We all had fallen in love before we got there (for
      several days before, my 2-year-old was begging me to show him the speedboat
      pictures on the computer). We thought she might be just the thing for our
      regular 22 mile (round trip) commute to the farmer's market and swimming
      lessons in the big city - the Diablo can be a harsh ride.

      Katie is a beauty. Quick, stable, a real eye-turner (thumbs up from
      everybody on the water, and this in the shadow of the Navy's very newest
      ship!) She has a 50' finish - from that distance you would swear her deck
      is mahogany or something, finished bright, instead of brown painted plywood.

      Much nicer ride than I had expected, with a slightly distracting
      thumping/drumming across the chop (but none of the pounding of Diablo, on
      the same stretch). I was a bit disappointed in the size of the wake; with
      3 adults and 2 children aboard, it wasn't anything like the carpet of foam
      Bolger describes.

      I don't understand why Steve wants to sell her so cheap. She's definitely
      worth much more than the 2,000 he's asking. Maybe a buyer should look twice
      at the motor...

      Unfortunately while Katie is just the thing for us to travel in style, we
      are many years behind on maintenance of the fleet we already have - I have
      sworn future boats will be no-maintenance metal, and "She Whose Whim is Law"
      pointed out the impracticality of taking on one more almost-perfect boat.
      (and one new 20'+ boat per year is the limit )-;) Why "almost-perfect"?
      Half our landings are on ledge or sharp stone beaches, which will tear up
      the plywood (Diablo has a metal plate on the stem and forward bottom) and
      passenger entry/exit must be over the bow. Also, Steve outfitted her with a
      long-shaft outboard, when we need absolutely minimum draft for skimming over
      mudflats. And I could never keep the paintwork as nice as it deserves.


      I understand Steve will be at the Kingston Messabout, with Katie; some lucky
      soul will snap her up.

      Curtis
    • Roger Derby
      A few years back, on rec.boats.building, some Aussie kayaker mentioned that they painted at least part of their boat s bottom with a mix of epoxy and carbide.
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 3, 2003
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        A few years back, on rec.boats.building, some Aussie kayaker mentioned that
        they painted at least part of their boat's bottom with a mix of epoxy and
        carbide. Instead of the concrete wearing away the boat, their boats made
        grooves in the dock.

        Katie might still be right for you.

        Roger
        derbyrm@...
        http://derbyrm.mystarband.net

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Sal's Dad" <sals_dad@...>


        <snip>

        > Why "almost-perfect"?

        > Half our landings are on ledge or sharp stone beaches,
        > which will tear up the plywood (Diablo has a metal
        > plate on the stem and forward bottom) and passenger
        > entry/exit must be over the bow.
      • Paul
        ... mentioned that ... epoxy and ... made ... Could you supply the mix, type of carbide, suppliers etc. Great discussion at the messabout. Paul McLellan
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 3, 2003
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          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Roger Derby" <derbyrm@s...> wrote:
          > A few years back, on rec.boats.building, some Aussie kayaker
          mentioned that
          > they painted at least part of their boat's bottom with a mix of
          epoxy and
          > carbide. Instead of the concrete wearing away the boat, their boats
          made
          > grooves in the dock.
          >
          > Katie might still be right for you.
          >
          > Roger
          > derbyrm@s...
          > http://derbyrm.mystarband.net
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: "Sal's Dad" <sals_dad@b...>
          >
          > Wow!!! More details please, we all want a bulletproof bolger boat.
          Could you supply the mix, type of carbide, suppliers etc. Great
          discussion at the messabout. Paul McLellan
          > <snip>
          >
          > > Why "almost-perfect"?
          >
          > > Half our landings are on ledge or sharp stone beaches,
          > > which will tear up the plywood (Diablo has a metal
          > > plate on the stem and forward bottom) and passenger
          > > entry/exit must be over the bow.
        • Roger Derby
          I wish I had more details to give. As far as the mix goes, one just plays around on test pieces until it feels right. (I suspect that the carbide powder is
          Message 4 of 9 , Sep 3, 2003
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            I wish I had more details to give. As far as the mix goes, one just plays
            around on test pieces until it feels right. (I suspect that the carbide
            powder is non-thixatropic so one would add that stuff (colloidal silica)
            first and then stir in the carbide.

            The Aussie had a local source which isn't worth much to us in the Northern
            hemisphere. I searched for the stuff on the net and since I wanted a few
            pounds, not several hopper cars full, didn't have any luck.

            Following a suggestion in MAIB from several years ago, I did experiment with
            lime (from the garden shop) as a filler. Not bullet-proof like the carbide
            would be, but it did give a hard surface and it was cheap. I used it on a
            bulkhead which formed part of the anchor storage bin and could be expected
            to get a lot of abuse. As above, I used colloidal silica first and then
            added the lime.

            Roger
            derbyrm@...
            http://derbyrm.mystarband.net

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Paul" <bys@...>


            > --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Roger Derby" <derbyrm@s...> wrote:
            > > A few years back, on rec.boats.building, some Aussie kayaker
            > > mentioned that they painted at least part of their boat's bottom
            > > with a mix of epoxy and carbide. Instead of the concrete
            > > wearing away the boat, their boats made
            > > grooves in the dock.
            > >
            > > Katie might still be right for you.
            > >
            > > Roger
            > > derbyrm@s...
            > > http://derbyrm.mystarband.net
            > >
            > > ----- Original Message -----
            > > From: "Sal's Dad" <sals_dad@b...>
            > >
            > > Wow!!! More details please, we all want a bulletproof bolger boat.
            > Could you supply the mix, type of carbide, suppliers etc. Great
            > discussion at the messabout. Paul McLellan
            > > <snip>
            > >
            > > > Why "almost-perfect"?
            > >
            > > > Half our landings are on ledge or sharp stone beaches,
            > > > which will tear up the plywood (Diablo has a metal
            > > > plate on the stem and forward bottom) and passenger
            > > > entry/exit must be over the bow.
          • chodges31711
            ... Northern ... a few ... I work for CE Minerals at the Andersonville mines. We crush and size fused white alumina and sintered tabular alumina. This is 99+%
            Message 5 of 9 , Sep 3, 2003
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              >
              > The Aussie had a local source which isn't worth much to us in the
              Northern
              > hemisphere. I searched for the stuff on the net and since I wanted
              a few
              > pounds, not several hopper cars full, didn't have any luck.


              I work for CE Minerals at the Andersonville mines. We crush and size
              fused white alumina and sintered tabular alumina. This is 99+%
              aluminum oxide like grinder discs are made from. We fuse it to get
              crystals and then fracture it to get the sharp edges. Sizes from 3
              mesh down to 325. It is very hard stuff and probably cheaper than
              carbide. I'm not in the marketing end but we package from 50 lb. bags
              to unit trains and ship loads. There are many other types of hard
              minerals that could be put in epoxy and would give good wear
              resistance. Maybe even granite fines from a stone cutters saw or
              monument carver.

              www.ceminerals.com

              Charles
            • chodges31711
              This site has a hardness scale in moh s. http://webmineral.com/help/Hardness.shtml diamond is 10, carbide is 9.5, corundum (Al. oxide) is 9.0 Quartz (sand/
              Message 6 of 9 , Sep 3, 2003
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                This site has a hardness scale in moh's.

                http://webmineral.com/help/Hardness.shtml

                diamond is 10, carbide is 9.5, corundum (Al. oxide) is 9.0
                Quartz (sand/ glass) is 7.0, steel is 5.5


                Most rocks are probably in the 3-5 range so if your coating is harder
                than steel (5.5) it should do the job. You would want it tough enough
                not to shatter and come off. The epoxy should bind it in a matrix and
                help that. An experiment with a small piece of wood might be
                worthwhile.

                Charles
              • Mark A.
                Others that are commonly used on the Northwest river running boats include mixed in graphite powder, or an overlay of UHMW. Mark
                Message 7 of 9 , Sep 3, 2003
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                  Others that are commonly used on the Northwest river running boats include mixed in
                  graphite powder, or an overlay of UHMW.


                  Mark

                  chodges31711 wrote:
                  > There are many other types of hard
                  > minerals that could be put in epoxy and would give good wear
                  > resistance. Maybe even granite fines from a stone cutters saw or
                  > monument carver.
                • Harry James
                  A recent boatbuilder magazine had an article on a experiment by a boatbuilding amateur. He found 1 layer of Xynole to be 6 times as abrasion resistant as 1
                  Message 8 of 9 , Sep 3, 2003
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                    A recent boatbuilder magazine had an article on a experiment by a
                    boatbuilding amateur. He found 1 layer of Xynole to be 6 times as
                    abrasion resistant as 1 layer of 6 oz fiberglas. Because of the extra
                    bulk of the xynole, it was only 2 times as resistant by thickness.

                    HJ

                    Roger Derby wrote:

                    >I wish I had more details to give. As far as the mix goes, one just plays
                    >around on test pieces until it feels right. (I suspect that the carbide
                    >powder is non-thixatropic so one would add that stuff (colloidal silica)
                    >first and then stir in the carbide.
                    >
                    >The Aussie had a local source which isn't worth much to us in the Northern
                    >hemisphere. I searched for the stuff on the net and since I wanted a few
                    >pounds, not several hopper cars full, didn't have any luck.
                    >
                    >Following a suggestion in MAIB from several years ago, I did experiment with
                    >lime (from the garden shop) as a filler. Not bullet-proof like the carbide
                    >would be, but it did give a hard surface and it was cheap. I used it on a
                    >bulkhead which formed part of the anchor storage bin and could be expected
                    >to get a lot of abuse. As above, I used colloidal silica first and then
                    >added the lime.
                    >
                    >Roger
                    >derbyrm@...
                    >http://derbyrm.mystarband.net
                    >
                    >----- Original Message -----
                    >From: "Paul" <bys@...>
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • philippe peltier
                    You should try to do the first layer of underwater paint with pitch epoxy.. Works great...see : HYPERLINK
                    Message 9 of 9 , Sep 4, 2003
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                      You should try to do the first layer of underwater paint with pitch
                      epoxy.. Works great...see :
                      HYPERLINK
                      "http://www.surtech2000.co.uk/Wall%20Product%20Pages/pitchepoxy.html"htt
                      p://www.surtech2000.co.uk/Wall%20Product%20Pages/pitchepoxy.html
                      You may use any underwater paint over it..

                      --
                      Phil.

                      -----Message d'origine-----
                      De : Mark A. [mailto:marka@...]
                      Envoyé : Thursday, September 04, 2003 3:55 AM
                      À : bolger@yahoogroups.com
                      Objet : [bolger] Re: Sneakeasy "Katie" report


                      Others that are commonly used on the Northwest river running boats
                      include mixed in
                      graphite powder, or an overlay of UHMW.


                      Mark

                      chodges31711 wrote:
                      > There are many other types of hard
                      > minerals that could be put in epoxy and would give good wear
                      > resistance. Maybe even granite fines from a stone cutters saw or
                      > monument carver.


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