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White Eel

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  • Frank San Miguel
    I ve uploaded my own rendering of White Eel into the Bolger3 Files Section. It s not perfectly accurate, but I think the profile is mostly correct.
    Message 1 of 18 , Jul 31, 2003
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      I've uploaded my own rendering of White Eel into the Bolger3 Files
      Section. It's not perfectly accurate, but I think the profile is
      mostly correct.

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Bolger3/files/White%20Eel/
    • Bruce Hallman
      I cannot sit around and take this silently anymore! Isn t the new Bolger design White Eel fascinating? What a great conceptual live-a-board. I can easily
      Message 2 of 18 , Oct 18, 2007
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        I cannot sit around and take this silently anymore! Isn't the new
        Bolger design 'White Eel' fascinating? What a great conceptual
        live-a-board. I can easily envision building that hull, essentially a
        tripled Topaz. Hire a couple $10/hr helpers, some cheap bulk epoxy
        and build it, (rent a rough terrain forklift a few times for the
        flips). About as easy as building a small house.
      • Kenneth Grome
        ... Where can we see the drawings and read more about it? Sincerely, Ken Grome Bagacay Boatworks www.bagacayboatworks.com
        Message 3 of 18 , Oct 18, 2007
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          > Isn't the new Bolger design 'White Eel' fascinating?

          Where can we see the drawings and read more about it?

          Sincerely,
          Ken Grome
          Bagacay Boatworks
          www.bagacayboatworks.com
        • Andres Espino
          Me too.. I am totally unfamiliar with it.. don t remember seeing it on the bolger plans site.. where can we find out more about it? Andrew ... Where can we see
          Message 4 of 18 , Oct 18, 2007
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            Me too.. I am totally unfamiliar with it.. don't remember seeing it on the bolger plans site.. where can we find out more about it?

            Andrew


            Kenneth Grome <bagacayboatworks@...> wrote:
            > Isn't the new Bolger design 'White Eel' fascinating?

            Where can we see the drawings and read more about it?

            Sincerely,
            Ken Grome
            Bagacay Boatworks
            www.bagacayboatworks.com





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          • Bruce Hallman
            Oops, I presumed everybody was reading the Bolger articles in the magazine Messing About In Boats. The last two issues featured an in depth discussion of
            Message 5 of 18 , Oct 18, 2007
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              Oops, I presumed everybody was reading the Bolger articles in the
              magazine Messing About In Boats. The last two issues featured an in
              depth discussion of White Eel, which is in the new family of
              'sustainable' fishery boats, though White Eel is not explicitly rigged
              for fishing, but one could imagine such.


              >
              > Where can we see the drawings and read more about it?
            • Andres Espino
              I did a search and was directed back to the group to the message #29943 where someone gives the specs for the White Eel and thats all I could find. Andrew
              Message 6 of 18 , Oct 18, 2007
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                I did a search and was directed back to the group to the message #29943 where someone gives the specs for the "White Eel" and thats all I could find.

                Andrew

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              • Kenneth Grome
                I wouldn t have received the first of those last two issues of MAIB by now even if I were a subscriber. It usually takes a month before I get things in the
                Message 7 of 18 , Oct 18, 2007
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                  I wouldn't have received the first of those last two issues of MAIB by
                  now even if I were a subscriber. It usually takes a month before I get
                  things in the mail from the USA.

                  I bought a bunch of old issues of MAIB from a guy who was selling them a
                  couple months ago, but they haven't been shipped to me in the
                  Philippines yet, so I don't even have the old issues to look at ... but
                  I'm hoping to get them by Christmas.

                  The limited description of White Eel sounds interesting, thanks for the
                  head's up Bruce, I'll be interested in checking it out some day.

                  Sincerely,
                  Ken Grome
                  Bagacay Boatworks
                  www.bagacayboatworks.com






                  > Oops, I presumed everybody was reading the Bolger articles in the
                  > magazine Messing About In Boats. The last two issues featured an in
                  > depth discussion of White Eel, which is in the new family of
                  > 'sustainable' fishery boats, though White Eel is not explicitly
                  > rigged for fishing, but one could imagine such.
                  >
                  > > Where can we see the drawings and read more about it?



                  --
                • GarthAB
                  I thought Frank San Miguel had commissioned the White Eel design back in 2002 or so, when he was contemplating a Great Circle trip. Garth
                  Message 8 of 18 , Oct 19, 2007
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                    I thought Frank San Miguel had commissioned the White Eel design back
                    in 2002 or so, when he was contemplating a Great Circle trip.

                    Garth


                    --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Hallman" <bruce@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Oops, I presumed everybody was reading the Bolger articles in the
                    > magazine Messing About In Boats. The last two issues featured an in
                    > depth discussion of White Eel, which is in the new family of
                    > 'sustainable' fishery boats, though White Eel is not explicitly rigged
                    > for fishing, but one could imagine such.
                    >
                    >
                    > >
                    > > Where can we see the drawings and read more about it?
                    >
                  • adventures_in_astrophotography
                    Hi Garth, ... That s my understanding, too. I recall Susanne mentioning a fellow up the road from me in Monument, CO who had commissioned a big liveaboard,
                    Message 9 of 18 , Oct 19, 2007
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                      Hi Garth,

                      > I thought Frank San Miguel had commissioned the White Eel design back
                      > in 2002 or so, when he was contemplating a Great Circle trip.

                      That's my understanding, too. I recall Susanne mentioning a fellow up
                      the road from me in Monument, CO who had commissioned a big
                      liveaboard, and some time later I got an email from him, but I believe
                      he and his family had moved from the area by that time. As that was
                      several years ago, it's possible that White Eel no longer fits his
                      family situation, but I couldn't say.

                      One question I have on White Eel is how much of a roller it might be.
                      No mention was made of anti-rolling devices in the articles that I
                      recall, and even a flat-bottomed, hard-chined boat is going to roll
                      some. I'm not sure I'd want to be at the on-deck bridge controls when
                      that's happening.

                      There's at least a profile view of this boat somewhere in one of the
                      Bolger groups' Files section. Personally, I prefer the aesthetics of
                      the fishing version shown in one of the MAIB articles over White Eel's
                      looks. Something about White Eel says "AMC Pacer" to me.

                      Jon Kolb
                      www.kolbsadventures.com/boatbuilding_index.htm
                    • Clyde Wisner
                      You can subscribe to MAIB and receive it on the web. I think Bob Hicks was just writing about it in the last issue but I don t have at hand. Clyde ...
                      Message 10 of 18 , Oct 19, 2007
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                        You can subscribe to "MAIB" and receive it on the web. I think Bob Hicks
                        was just writing about it in the last issue but I don't have at hand. Clyde

                        Kenneth Grome wrote:

                        > I wouldn't have received the first of those last two issues of MAIB by
                        > now even if I were a subscriber. It usually takes a month before I get
                        > things in the mail from the USA.
                        >
                        > I bought a bunch of old issues of MAIB from a guy who was selling them a
                        > couple months ago, but they haven't been shipped to me in the
                        > Philippines yet, so I don't even have the old issues to look at ... but
                        > I'm hoping to get them by Christmas.
                        >
                        > The limited description of White Eel sounds interesting, thanks for the
                        > head's up Bruce, I'll be interested in checking it out some day.
                        >
                        > Sincerely,
                        > Ken Grome
                        > Bagacay Boatworks
                        > www.bagacayboatworks.com
                        >
                        > > Oops, I presumed everybody was reading the Bolger articles in the
                        > > magazine Messing About In Boats. The last two issues featured an in
                        > > depth discussion of White Eel, which is in the new family of
                        > > 'sustainable' fishery boats, though White Eel is not explicitly
                        > > rigged for fishing, but one could imagine such.
                        > >
                        > > > Where can we see the drawings and read more about it?
                        >
                        > --
                        >
                        >




                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Bruce Hallman
                        ... Like a battleship? ... To me the swoopy windows remind me of Tahiti. A few things I recall for the article 100 hp inboard diesel, with an odd dog leg in
                        Message 11 of 18 , Oct 19, 2007
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                          On 10/19/07, adventures_in_astrophotography <jon@...> wrote:
                          > recall, and even a flat-bottomed, hard-chined boat is going to roll

                          Like a battleship?

                          > the fishing version shown in one of the MAIB articles over White Eel's
                          > looks. Something about White Eel says "AMC Pacer" to me.

                          To me the swoopy windows remind me of Tahiti.

                          A few things I recall for the article 100 hp inboard diesel, with an
                          odd 'dog leg' in the drive train. 400 sheets of 1/2" plywood. A
                          fascinating 'midship' cockpit console. About $100K of building cost
                          rough estimate. Large fuel and water 'tankage' at midship, plus a
                          giant 'don't look down' head. Berths for about eight people.
                        • Charles Rouse
                          ... back ... up ... believe ... was ... be. ... when ... Yeah, we could use some input from someone who does long trips in motor craft to comment on this.
                          Message 12 of 18 , Oct 19, 2007
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                            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com,
                            "adventures_in_astrophotography" <jon@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Hi Garth,
                            >
                            > > I thought Frank San Miguel had commissioned the White Eel design
                            back
                            > > in 2002 or so, when he was contemplating a Great Circle trip.
                            >
                            > That's my understanding, too. I recall Susanne mentioning a fellow
                            up
                            > the road from me in Monument, CO who had commissioned a big
                            > liveaboard, and some time later I got an email from him, but I
                            believe
                            > he and his family had moved from the area by that time. As that
                            was
                            > several years ago, it's possible that White Eel no longer fits his
                            > family situation, but I couldn't say.
                            >
                            > One question I have on White Eel is how much of a roller it might
                            be.
                            > No mention was made of anti-rolling devices in the articles that I
                            > recall, and even a flat-bottomed, hard-chined boat is going to roll
                            > some. I'm not sure I'd want to be at the on-deck bridge controls
                            when
                            > that's happening.

                            >
                            > Jon Kolb
                            > www.kolbsadventures.com/boatbuilding_index.htm
                            >

                            Yeah, we could use some input from someone who does long trips in
                            motor craft to comment on this. Susanne A. was talking about a boat
                            while at Mystic in June. From her description, it may have been this
                            boat. She said they were trying for a design that would have
                            passagemaking capability with a relatively small engine and would use
                            hull form, I assume long and narrow, to achieve this and one aspect
                            of this economy of fuel would be to not use paravanes or similar
                            devices. While the paravane steadies, it also drags, of course. She
                            said (this is from memory) that the seat at the helm would be on a
                            sort of gimballed arangement so that the boat would roll and the
                            helmsman would be sitting steady. Of course even if it worked, the
                            crew would still be subject to the roll unless they had their own
                            gimballed seats. Robert Beebe said something about the worst roll is
                            a power boat in a beam sea and I think I can attest to that even if I
                            haven't gone accross an ocean in a power boat. Charles Rouse
                          • Bruce Hallman
                            ... Beebee, Bolger and Altenberger all are very well informed on hull shape and beam sea roll. I can imagine the difference in roll of a 1 foot wide cylinder
                            Message 13 of 18 , Oct 19, 2007
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                              > the worst roll is a power boat in a beam sea and I think

                              Beebee, Bolger and Altenberger all are very well informed on hull
                              shape and beam sea roll.

                              I can imagine the difference in roll of a 1 foot wide cylinder and a 1
                              foot wide plank. The cylinder rolls more easily than the plank.

                              And, personally I observe that the 'hard chine' of a Micro seems have
                              much less beam sea roll than a similar sized rounded hull. In short
                              flat bottom sharpies, I think, have favorable beam sea roll character.

                              Still, fatigue risk on ocean passagemakers justifies a gimbaled seat,
                              like with Tahiti and HG Hassler. (Hassler even has a gimbaled
                              sleeping berth.)
                            • Kristine Bennett
                              I have spent a few days in the Gulf of Alaska. I have yet to see a boat that doesn t roll. I ve been on 82 by 30 foot power barge going across the Gulf and
                              Message 14 of 18 , Oct 19, 2007
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                                I have spent a few days in the Gulf of Alaska. I have yet to see a boat that doesn't roll. I've been on 82 by 30 foot power barge going across the Gulf and when you are at the helm you feel like a BB in a matchbox.

                                You are right a hard chine boat tends to roll less but they still roll. On a round bulged boat you can put rolling chocks and they help a lot. Even with what you people call paravanes I know as stabilizers or stabis will cut the roll but they don't stop it. At trolling speeds they add some drag, the hassle we had was keeping the speed down so we could troll

                                Yes a bean sea is the worst for roll but deppending on the hull a stern quartering sea is the worst for controlling the boat.

                                Ahhh yes the summers spent in a troll cockpit running gear in SE Alaska. It was a lot of work but you know I had fun doing it! Yep the old hook and line fishery. LOL the good old days! :)

                                Yes I know I'm dating myself.

                                Goddess Bless every one!
                                Krissie

                                Charles Rouse <zavala@...> wrote:

                                Yeah, we could use some input from someone who does long trips in
                                motor craft to comment on this. Susanne A. was talking about a boat
                                while at Mystic in June. From her description, it may have been this
                                boat. She said they were trying for a design that would have
                                passagemaking capability with a relatively small engine and would use
                                hull form, I assume long and narrow, to achieve this and one aspect
                                of this economy of fuel would be to not use paravanes or similar
                                devices. While the paravane steadies, it also drags, of course. She
                                said (this is from memory) that the seat at the helm would be on a
                                sort of gimballed arangement so that the boat would roll and the
                                helmsman would be sitting steady. Of course even if it worked, the
                                crew would still be subject to the roll unless they had their own
                                gimballed seats. Robert Beebe said something about the worst roll is
                                a power boat in a beam sea and I think I can attest to that even if I
                                haven't gone accross an ocean in a power boat. Charles Rouse





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                              • John Gilbert
                                Everything rolls. Most large fishing vessels being built these days have antirolling tanks. most cruise ships have gyro controled fins to reduce and control
                                Message 15 of 18 , Oct 20, 2007
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                                  Everything rolls. Most large fishing vessels being built these days have antirolling tanks. most cruise ships have gyro controled fins to reduce and control transverse oscillations. Roll damping using chines or bilge keels helps but are not solutions for all situations. Chines and bilge keels are static. They slow the period of roll and provide some damping but in the wrong sea-state the vessels period of roll may synchronize the the period of the waves and the motion can be worse.
                                  In a small boat you might effectivly change the period of roll by moving your body somewhere else in the boat perhaps higher or lower or athwartships. When paddling my double paddle canoe in rough water I tend to move my upper body in sympathy with the waves. I roll one side up a little so as the wave approaches the top won't slop into the boat....and as it passes under me, I roll that high side down a bit. This all sounds complex and it is a skill of a lifetime on/in small boats. I have never gone over when I did not intend to, though I have taken water over the side, perhaps a cup maximum. I do this close to shore and would not take this boat on longer open water crossings except in calm conditions.
                                  JG
                                  ----- Original Message ----
                                  From: Kristine Bennett <femmpaws@...>
                                  To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Friday, October 19, 2007 10:04:19 PM
                                  Subject: Re: [bolger] Re: White Eel

                                  I have spent a few days in the Gulf of Alaska. I have yet to see a boat that doesn't roll. I've been on 82 by 30 foot power barge going across the Gulf and when you are at the helm you feel like a BB in a matchbox.

                                  You are right a hard chine boat tends to roll less but they still roll. On a round bulged boat you can put rolling chocks and they help a lot. Even with what you people call paravanes I know as stabilizers or stabis will cut the roll but they don't stop it. At trolling speeds they add some drag, the hassle we had was keeping the speed down so we could troll

                                  Yes a bean sea is the worst for roll but deppending on the hull a stern quartering sea is the worst for controlling the boat.

                                  Ahhh yes the summers spent in a troll cockpit running gear in SE Alaska. It was a lot of work but you know I had fun doing it! Yep the old hook and line fishery. LOL the good old days! :)

                                  Yes I know I'm dating myself.

                                  Goddess Bless every one!
                                  Krissie

                                  Charles Rouse <zavala@snowcrest. net> wrote:

                                  Yeah, we could use some input from someone who does long trips in
                                  motor craft to comment on this. Susanne A. was talking about a boat
                                  while at Mystic in June. From her description, it may have been this
                                  boat. She said they were trying for a design that would have
                                  passagemaking capability with a relatively small engine and would use
                                  hull form, I assume long and narrow, to achieve this and one aspect
                                  of this economy of fuel would be to not use paravanes or similar
                                  devices. While the paravane steadies, it also drags, of course. She
                                  said (this is from memory) that the seat at the helm would be on a
                                  sort of gimballed arangement so that the boat would roll and the
                                  helmsman would be sitting steady. Of course even if it worked, the
                                  crew would still be subject to the roll unless they had their own
                                  gimballed seats. Robert Beebe said something about the worst roll is
                                  a power boat in a beam sea and I think I can attest to that even if I
                                  haven't gone accross an ocean in a power boat. Charles Rouse





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                                • Harry James
                                  Kristine The troll fishery has seen a major resurgence lately. Troll permit prices have tripled in the last 7-8 years. People are back to making a living at
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Oct 20, 2007
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                                    Kristine

                                    The troll fishery has seen a major resurgence lately. Troll permit
                                    prices have tripled in the last 7-8 years. People are back to making a
                                    living at it.

                                    HJ

                                    Kristine Bennett wrote:
                                    > I have spent a few days in the Gulf of Alaska. I have yet to see a boat that doesn't roll. I've been on 82 by 30 foot power barge going across the Gulf and when you are at the helm you feel like a BB in a matchbox.
                                    >
                                    > You are right a hard chine boat tends to roll less but they still roll. On a round bulged boat you can put rolling chocks and they help a lot. Even with what you people call paravanes I know as stabilizers or stabis will cut the roll but they don't stop it. At trolling speeds they add some drag, the hassle we had was keeping the speed down so we could troll
                                    >
                                    > Yes a bean sea is the worst for roll but deppending on the hull a stern quartering sea is the worst for controlling the boat.
                                    >
                                    > Ahhh yes the summers spent in a troll cockpit running gear in SE Alaska. It was a lot of work but you know I had fun doing it! Yep the old hook and line fishery. LOL the good old days! :)
                                    >
                                    > Yes I know I'm dating myself.
                                    >
                                    > Goddess Bless every one!
                                    > Krissie
                                    >
                                    >
                                  • Peter Lenihan
                                    ... Yup...right here: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Bolger3/files/White%20Eel/ Peter
                                    Message 17 of 18 , Oct 23, 2007
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                                      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "adventures_in_astrophotography"
                                      <jon@...> wrote:
                                      > There's at least a profile view of this boat somewhere in one of the
                                      > Bolger groups' Files section.
                                      Yup...right here:

                                      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Bolger3/files/White%20Eel/

                                      Peter
                                    • Frank San Miguel
                                      I just noticed this thread. Yes, we commissioned White Eel in 2000 to cross the Atlantic and explore Europe. This was back in the internet bubble when I
                                      Message 18 of 18 , Oct 31, 2007
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                                        I just noticed this thread.

                                        Yes, we commissioned White Eel in 2000 to cross the Atlantic and
                                        explore Europe. This was back in the internet bubble when I though I
                                        was going to have a lot of money. Now that my children are 10 and 11,
                                        I don't think we will be doing something like this any time soon.

                                        White Eel is an incredible boat. I've been wondering when Phil and
                                        Suzanne were going to publish it and I didn't want to say much until
                                        they had. I've been reading the MAIB articles and haven't found
                                        anything new from the original proposal, except that they drew a
                                        different tender on the top view in second article. The profile in
                                        the picture I uploaded back in 2003 is my own rendering and it
                                        includes changes to the window patterns based on my preferences back
                                        then. If I were to build her today, I would use the PCB&F profile as
                                        they designed it, not my 2003 version. I like theirs better.

                                        As far as rolling, White Eel is supposed to make very fast passages
                                        and be equipped with Gimbaled seats. Plus she is narrow and has a 4"
                                        bottom.

                                        Below is the letter that started it all.

                                        Frank
                                        --
                                        Feb. 27, 2000
                                        Phil Bolger & Friends
                                        PO Box 1209, 29 Ferry St.
                                        Gloucester, Ma 01930

                                        Dear Phil and Susanne,

                                        I have long considered taking a two year sabbatical to spend time
                                        cruising with my family. When I read your series on ocean
                                        passagemakers in MAIB recently, I was intrigued enough to get a copy
                                        of "Voyaging under power" and read it cover to cover. I have been a
                                        small boat coastal sailor all of my life and have always assumed that
                                        my eventual ocean cruise would be in a large sailboat, but now I am a
                                        convert to the seagoing motor cruiser (with one exception noted
                                        below). I write this letter to you to explore the possibility of a
                                        commission.

                                        Here is the idea for our cruise (I had this plan before I read Bebe's
                                        book, really). This cruise would start 3 to 4 years from now with
                                        myself, my wife and our two young kids.

                                        1. While working full time, purchase a used boat or have boat built
                                        and outfitted at a shipyard.
                                        2. Cruise the intracoastal waterway from Maine to Vero Beach, FL for 3
                                        to 6 months. This trip has several purposes;
                                        * a shakedown cruise for the boat
                                        * shakedown cruise for crew: are we going to make it this way for
                                        another year and half? Go/no-go decision.
                                        * piloting and seamanship experience for captain and crew (this would
                                        include appropriate classes in navigation, piloting, safety, etc)
                                        * visit with friends in most of the states up and down the east coast.
                                        3. Local exploring to be done on a 15' - 20' sail boat that is stowed
                                        on deck. This would include overnight camp-cruising of up to a week
                                        (we have plenty of experience in this). This is how I intend to
                                        satisfy my sailing urge.
                                        4. Wife and kids fly to Azores or England
                                        5. Cross Atlantic with guest crew and meet family on the other side.
                                        6. Cruise Europe and the Mediterranean
                                        7. Return to US and sell the boat
                                        8.Return to the full-time working life

                                        So given this itinerary and my limited research, here is a short list
                                        of features:

                                        1. If I have it designed and built:
                                        * steel construction appeals most to me.
                                        * simple is good!

                                        2. General
                                        * capable of making the Atlantic crossing east-west and west-east and
                                        cruising in Europe and the Mediterranean
                                        * accommodations for live aboard for a family of four - two adults,
                                        two small children (cruising grounds only).
                                        * office space for all home schooling activities and supplies
                                        * satellite communications for keeping up a part-time computer
                                        software consulting business
                                        * no more than 50' LOA
                                        * draft, width and height above waterline for cruising the European
                                        canal system is preferred
                                        * fuel, water, stores and spares for a 2500 to 4000 mile cruising range
                                        * paravane stabilization
                                        * deck space for securing a 15' - 20' "captain's barge"
                                        * modest cruising speed hull design
                                        * heavy displacement (D/L 240-340)
                                        * simple outfitting and accommodations; luxury items such as
                                        complicated environmental controls, galley systems, electrical
                                        systems, excessive brightwork are a definite negative. Workboat
                                        finish is preferred.
                                        * single reliable engine & associated systems preferred

                                        Cruising Style:
                                        * Our kids are 3 and 4 years old now, so they will be fairly young
                                        when we embark. I intend to plan the voyage to avoid unnecessary heavy
                                        weather passages. But when we are caught, I want a boat that is as
                                        safe as possible. I would sacrifice deck space to have both a yawl
                                        boat (like that on Bell's Puffer) and the captain's barge (perhaps
                                        stacking like in the old days?)
                                        * This is to be a full-time educational cruise. We intend to use the
                                        boat as a floating school for the real-time study. One big field trip.
                                        * We plan to do skin diving and scuba diving in the warmer parts of
                                        our cruise.
                                        * We plan to spend weeks in each port, exploring via captain's barge,
                                        bicycle, train, bus, etc.
                                        * I have experience with rebuilding auto engines, building small
                                        wooden boats, performing electrical wiring and designing and debugging
                                        electronics and computer systems. I want to be able to self-maintain
                                        as much of the boat as possible.
                                        * I expect to finance the entire project without obtaining a loan.

                                        A little research with the yacht broker community leads me to believe
                                        that it will be hard to find a used boat that meets all of these
                                        criteria. If I were to sacrifice a few things like the captain's
                                        barge and the French canals and accept some of the risks of buying a
                                        used boat, I might buy and outfit a non-yachty cruiser for around
                                        $200,000 - $300,000. But I'd really like to cruise the canals and
                                        sail around in each port. And I really love your designs.

                                        If I have a boat built myself, I expect to pay a premium for the
                                        customized boat, and expect to take a significant loss on the sale of
                                        the boat after two years (at least in small boats, it is always
                                        cheaper to buy a used boat). Who knows, maybe my retired parents in
                                        Florida will take it on. My father, who ran a shipyard for years, may
                                        even help with the construction and outfitting phase (as well as parts
                                        of the voyage).



                                        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "adventures_in_astrophotography"
                                        <jon@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > Hi Garth,
                                        >
                                        > > I thought Frank San Miguel had commissioned the White Eel design back
                                        > > in 2002 or so, when he was contemplating a Great Circle trip.
                                        >
                                        > That's my understanding, too. I recall Susanne mentioning a fellow up
                                        > the road from me in Monument, CO who had commissioned a big
                                        > liveaboard, and some time later I got an email from him, but I believe
                                        > he and his family had moved from the area by that time. As that was
                                        > several years ago, it's possible that White Eel no longer fits his
                                        > family situation, but I couldn't say.
                                        >
                                        > One question I have on White Eel is how much of a roller it might be.
                                        > No mention was made of anti-rolling devices in the articles that I
                                        > recall, and even a flat-bottomed, hard-chined boat is going to roll
                                        > some. I'm not sure I'd want to be at the on-deck bridge controls when
                                        > that's happening.
                                        >
                                        > There's at least a profile view of this boat somewhere in one of the
                                        > Bolger groups' Files section. Personally, I prefer the aesthetics of
                                        > the fishing version shown in one of the MAIB articles over White Eel's
                                        > looks. Something about White Eel says "AMC Pacer" to me.
                                        >
                                        > Jon Kolb
                                        > www.kolbsadventures.com/boatbuilding_index.htm
                                        >
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