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Re: Sprit Sail rig

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  • honestjohn37
    John and Craig, Yes, you guys have got it right. The snotter is as your drawing shows, the sprit is turned down to a smaller diameter at the end, and the
    Message 1 of 17 , Jun 2, 2003
      John and Craig,
      Yes, you guys have got it right. The snotter is as your drawing
      shows, the sprit is turned down to a smaller diameter at the end, and
      the snotter has a braided loop that just fits in that loop. And Dr.
      Craig, yes, there is a jib. I was waiting to spring that one on you,
      but hadn't had the nerve yet. But now the snotter's out of the
      scupper or whatever(what?), so the final mystery of the rig must be
      addressed. If I assume that:
      1.)the sheave-wheel in the mast is for the (loosely laced)mainsail
      halyard, and
      2.) the block at the masthead is for the jib halyard,
      3.) another block would be required for the theoretically possible
      brailing line. A local here told me that there should be a halyard
      from the masthead to the peak-end of the sprit with which the sprit is
      pulled up to the mast, but he had never seen the connection from the
      masthead to the clew. He used the word 'wrong' for that. It would
      seem that where I tie the sprit halyard off would be somewhat
      academic, there are a couple of loose wooden cleats which I haven't
      been able to find the proper place for yet, which will serve nicely. I
      don't think any fairleads were used.
      So professors, does that sound somewhat sensible? Now, what about
      reefing?......
      appreciatively yours,
      John Mann

      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, jhkohnen@b... wrote:
      > That's a lug rig, Craig. ;o)
      >
      > Snotter: Some sprit-rigged boats had a simple loop around the mast
      that the
      > heel of the sprit fit into, sounds like John's got something like
      that. To
      > adjust the sprit, the loop was pushed up or down the mast. To keep
      the loop
      > from slipping on the mast it was kept damp.
      >
      > A good kind of lacing to use is what's called "forth and back",
      where the
      > lacing line goes through a particular sail grommet and then comes back
      > around the same side of the mast. This kind of lacing doesn't jam
      when you
      > raise or lower the sail. Don't lace the sail tightly to the mast,
      it'll work
      > better a little loose.
      >
      > Here's a sketch of forth and back lacing. Does your snotter look
      something
      > like this, John?
      >
      > http://www.boat-links.com/images/SpritsailLacing.gif
      >
      > On Thu, 29 May 2003 17:41:47 -0400, Craig wrote:
      > > >Then I fitted the sprit into the
      > > >pocket in the peak of the sail. Then I fitted the snotter. Fine so
      > > >far.
      > > ...
      > >
      http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~fassitt/cranks/dinghy/dinghy_rig.html
      >
      > --
      > John <jkohnen@b...>
      > http://www.boat-links.com/
      > The denunciation of the young is a necessary part of the hygiene of
      > older people, and greatly assists the circulation of the blood.
      > <Logan Pearsall Smith>
    • jhkohnen@boat-links.com
      I think we re getting close. I ve never heard of a line from the peak end of the sprit to the masthead, and it doesn t sound like it d be very practical. Your
      Message 2 of 17 , Jun 2, 2003
        I think we're getting close. I've never heard of a line from the peak end of
        the sprit to the masthead, and it doesn't sound like it'd be very practical.
        Your local source may have given you a garbled description of a brail. You
        may not have a brail now, it's awfully handy, but lots of traditional sprit
        rigs didn't have one. Don't worry about that now.

        To reduce sail in a blow, remove the sprit and lash the peak of the sail to
        the tack (or just let it blow out to leeward). This is called
        "scandalizing". You may not be able to get to windward with a scandalized
        sail, but it'll work well enough on other points.

        Now it's time for some of the finer points. The throat of the sail should be
        fastened to the mast with a loop of strong line, this loop is under a lot of
        strain from the sprit. The forth and back lacing will start at the next
        grommet down. I use an "English Knot" on the throat loop, since it's strong,
        secure and easy to adjust.

        Secure the tack downhaul and tighten the halyard to make the luff taut (even
        if you never lower the sail, the halyard is used to adjust the luff tension,
        without it you could use an adjustable tack downhaul). Install the sprit,
        then pull in the sheet until the boat wants to sail away (maybe with the
        trailer? <g>) and then peak the sprit up until the wrinkles that run from
        throat to clew just go away. Adjust the luff lacing (I use a stopper knot on
        each end) so that the slack is just taken up, but not so tight that the
        lacing pulls the luff closer to the mast. The sail will set better if the
        lacing isn't too tight.

        When sailing, the harder the wind blows, the tighter you want the luff
        tension and the harder you want to peak the sprit up (watch for those
        wrinkles from throat to clew), the lighter the wind, the slacker you want
        the luff and sprit. On my boat I've got the tack downhaul and snotter led
        back to near the helm so I can adjust the sail easily, but that's not
        "traditional".

        If you want to rig a brail, measure the head of the sail, then measure down
        the leech that same distance and install a grommet. The brail should be a
        light, slippery line, I'm using 1/8" braided dacron (again, not
        traditional). I seized a small block to the side of the throat loop opposite
        the knot. On the other side, I loosened the English Knot and threaded the
        end of the brail through the center of the knot and put a stopper knot in
        the end of it (of course there are other ways to do all this, this is just
        what I've done). The brail goes from the knot side of the loop, throught the
        grommet on the leech, up the other side and through the block, then down.
        It's a good idea to seize a small ring onto the luff lacing about halfway
        down the mast to run the brail through to keep it from flying around in the
        breeze.

        Here's a sketch of how I've got my brail rigged:

        http://www.boat-links.com/images/Brail.gif

        And here's something that probably looks a lot like your boat will when you
        get it all rigged :o)

        http://www.boat-links.com/images/Klitmoller.gif

        On Mon, 02 Jun 2003 12:20:42 -0000, Honest John wrote:
        > John and Craig,
        > Yes, you guys have got it right. The snotter is as your drawing
        > shows, the sprit is turned down to a smaller diameter at the end, and
        > the snotter has a braided loop that just fits in that loop. And Dr.
        > Craig, yes, there is a jib. I was waiting to spring that one on you,
        > but hadn't had the nerve yet. But now the snotter's out of the
        > scupper or whatever(what?), so the final mystery of the rig must be
        > addressed. If I assume that:
        > 1.)the sheave-wheel in the mast is for the (loosely laced)mainsail
        > halyard, and
        > 2.) the block at the masthead is for the jib halyard,
        > 3.) another block would be required for the theoretically possible
        > brailing line. A local here told me that there should be a halyard
        > from the masthead to the peak-end of the sprit with which the sprit is
        > pulled up to the mast, but he had never seen the connection from the
        > masthead to the clew. He used the word 'wrong' for that. It would
        > seem that where I tie the sprit halyard off would be somewhat
        > academic, there are a couple of loose wooden cleats which I haven't
        > been able to find the proper place for yet, which will serve nicely. I
        > don't think any fairleads were used.
        > So professors, does that sound somewhat sensible? Now, what about
        > reefing?......
        > appreciatively yours,
        > > http://www.boat-links.com/images/SpritsailLacing.gif

        --
        John <jkohnen@...>
        http://www.boat-links.com/
        I cannot help thinking that the people with motor boats miss a great deal.
        If they would only keep to rowboats or canoes, and use oar or paddle...
        they would get infinitely more benefit than by having their work done for
        them by gasoline. <Theodore Roosevelt>
      • craig o'donnell
        ... Yes. There are 3 ways to rig a brail that I know of. 1. A line to the peak (top) of the sprit to pull it to the mast, or some point on the sprit itself. 2.
        Message 3 of 17 , Jun 2, 2003
          >3.) another block would be required for the theoretically possible
          >brailing line. A local here told me that there should be a halyard
          >from the masthead to the peak-end of the sprit with which the sprit is
          >pulled up to the mast, but he had never seen the connection from the
          >masthead to the clew. He used the word 'wrong' for that. It would
          >seem that where I tie the sprit halyard off would be somewhat
          >academic, there are a couple of loose wooden cleats which I haven't
          >been able to find the proper place for yet, which will serve nicely. I
          >don't think any fairleads were used.

          Yes. There are 3 ways to rig a brail that I know of.

          1. A line to the peak (top) of the sprit to pull it to the mast, or
          some point on the sprit itself.

          2. A line, as John K has described, which starts at the masthead,
          runs through the leech of the sail a ways down (through a grommet or
          block or something), runs to a masthead pulley, and down to the deck.
          This gathers both sail and sprit.

          3. The line from masthead to the clew has been used on Delaware
          Duckers, but the Duckers have a boom. This brails the sail by pulling
          the aft end of the boom upward, etc. I don't see why this would not
          work on a boomless sail but the resulting bundle would not be very
          neat.

          Reefing, well, are there any lines of reef nettles or grommets?
          --
          Craig O'Donnell
          Sinepuxent Ancestors & Boats
          <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~fassitt/>
          The Proa FAQ <http://boat-links.com/proafaq.html>
          The Cheap Pages <http://www2.friend.ly.net/~dadadata/>
          Sailing Canoes, Polytarp Sails, Bamboo, Chinese Junks,
          American Proas, the Bolger Boat Honor Roll,
          Plywood Boats, Bamboo Rafts, &c.
          _________________________________

          -- Professor of Boatology -- Junkomologist
          -- Macintosh kinda guy
          Friend of Wanda the Wonder Cat, 1991-1997.
          _________________________________
          ---
          [This E-mail scanned for viruses by friend.ly.net.]
        • honestjohn37
          A veritable goldmine of knowledge in this group, and such nice, helpful people as well, it s an oasis of friendship in a world of conflict. Thank you all and
          Message 4 of 17 , Jun 3, 2003
            A veritable goldmine of knowledge in this group, and such nice,
            helpful people as well, it's an oasis of friendship in a world of
            conflict. Thank you all and especially Craig and John for your time
            and efforts in the cause of just fooling around; (but doing so
            properly). Your diagrams are printed out and sealed in plastic and
            placed on the thwarts as I work on the rig. I study them like an
            art-forger studies a Rembrandt. Now, in answer to Craigs last, 'no',
            there are no reefing points or grommets on the sail for that reefing
            procedure. Perhaps the scandlising technique is the most viable.
            Also, my Danish source named a top sail that was also sometimes used,
            would that entail a movable spar or would it rig to a spar lashed
            firmly to the masthead? It would surely look fine, but is probably a
            bit 'over the top', so to speak.
            John Mann
            --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, jhkohnen@b... wrote:
            > I think we're getting close. I've never heard of a line from the
            peak end of
            > the sprit to the masthead, and it doesn't sound like it'd be very
            practical.
            > Your local source may have given you a garbled description of a
            brail. You
            > may not have a brail now, it's awfully handy, but lots of
            traditional sprit
            > rigs didn't have one. Don't worry about that now.
            >
            > To reduce sail in a blow, remove the sprit and lash the peak of the
            sail to
            > the tack (or just let it blow out to leeward). This is called
            > "scandalizing". You may not be able to get to windward with a
            scandalized
            > sail, but it'll work well enough on other points.
            >
            > Now it's time for some of the finer points. The throat of the sail
            should be
            > fastened to the mast with a loop of strong line, this loop is under
            a lot of
            > strain from the sprit. The forth and back lacing will start at the next
            > grommet down. I use an "English Knot" on the throat loop, since it's
            strong,
            > secure and easy to adjust.
            >
            > Secure the tack downhaul and tighten the halyard to make the luff
            taut (even
            > if you never lower the sail, the halyard is used to adjust the luff
            tension,
            > without it you could use an adjustable tack downhaul). Install the
            sprit,
            > then pull in the sheet until the boat wants to sail away (maybe with the
            > trailer? <g>) and then peak the sprit up until the wrinkles that run
            from
            > throat to clew just go away. Adjust the luff lacing (I use a stopper
            knot on
            > each end) so that the slack is just taken up, but not so tight that the
            > lacing pulls the luff closer to the mast. The sail will set better
            if the
            > lacing isn't too tight.
            >
            > When sailing, the harder the wind blows, the tighter you want the luff
            > tension and the harder you want to peak the sprit up (watch for those
            > wrinkles from throat to clew), the lighter the wind, the slacker you
            want
            > the luff and sprit. On my boat I've got the tack downhaul and
            snotter led
            > back to near the helm so I can adjust the sail easily, but that's not
            > "traditional".
            >
            > If you want to rig a brail, measure the head of the sail, then
            measure down
            > the leech that same distance and install a grommet. The brail should
            be a
            > light, slippery line, I'm using 1/8" braided dacron (again, not
            > traditional). I seized a small block to the side of the throat loop
            opposite
            > the knot. On the other side, I loosened the English Knot and
            threaded the
            > end of the brail through the center of the knot and put a stopper
            knot in
            > the end of it (of course there are other ways to do all this, this
            is just
            > what I've done). The brail goes from the knot side of the loop,
            throught the
            > grommet on the leech, up the other side and through the block, then
            down.
            > It's a good idea to seize a small ring onto the luff lacing about
            halfway
            > down the mast to run the brail through to keep it from flying around
            in the
            > breeze.
            >
            > Here's a sketch of how I've got my brail rigged:
            >
            > http://www.boat-links.com/images/Brail.gif
            >
            > And here's something that probably looks a lot like your boat will
            when you
            > get it all rigged :o)
            >
            > http://www.boat-links.com/images/Klitmoller.gif
            >
            > On Mon, 02 Jun 2003 12:20:42 -0000, Honest John wrote:
            > > John and Craig,
            > > Yes, you guys have got it right. The snotter is as your drawing
            > > shows, the sprit is turned down to a smaller diameter at the end, and
            > > the snotter has a braided loop that just fits in that loop. And Dr.
            > > Craig, yes, there is a jib. I was waiting to spring that one on you,
            > > but hadn't had the nerve yet. But now the snotter's out of the
            > > scupper or whatever(what?), so the final mystery of the rig must be
            > > addressed. If I assume that:
            > > 1.)the sheave-wheel in the mast is for the (loosely laced)mainsail
            > > halyard, and
            > > 2.) the block at the masthead is for the jib halyard,
            > > 3.) another block would be required for the theoretically possible
            > > brailing line. A local here told me that there should be a halyard
            > > from the masthead to the peak-end of the sprit with which the sprit is
            > > pulled up to the mast, but he had never seen the connection from the
            > > masthead to the clew. He used the word 'wrong' for that. It would
            > > seem that where I tie the sprit halyard off would be somewhat
            > > academic, there are a couple of loose wooden cleats which I haven't
            > > been able to find the proper place for yet, which will serve nicely. I
            > > don't think any fairleads were used.
            > > So professors, does that sound somewhat sensible? Now, what about
            > > reefing?......
            > > appreciatively yours,
            > > > http://www.boat-links.com/images/SpritsailLacing.gif
            >
            > --
            > John <jkohnen@b...>
            > http://www.boat-links.com/
            > I cannot help thinking that the people with motor boats miss a great
            deal.
            > If they would only keep to rowboats or canoes, and use oar or
            paddle...
            > they would get infinitely more benefit than by having their work
            done for
            > them by gasoline. <Theodore Roosevelt>
          • craig o'donnell
            ... Probably a spar lashed vertically to the mast but I can t be sure. I think John Leather s SPRITSAILS AND LUGSAILS has a drawing of this boat. -- Craig
            Message 5 of 17 , Jun 3, 2003
              >Also, my Danish source named a top sail that was also sometimes used,
              >would that entail a movable spar or would it rig to a spar lashed
              >firmly to the masthead? It would surely look fine, but is probably a
              >bit 'over the top', so to speak.

              Probably a spar lashed vertically to the mast but I can't be sure. I
              think John Leather's SPRITSAILS AND LUGSAILS has a drawing of this
              boat.
              --
              Craig O'Donnell
              Sinepuxent Ancestors & Boats
              <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~fassitt/>
              The Proa FAQ <http://boat-links.com/proafaq.html>
              The Cheap Pages <http://www2.friend.ly.net/~dadadata/>
              Sailing Canoes, Polytarp Sails, Bamboo, Chinese Junks,
              American Proas, the Bolger Boat Honor Roll,
              Plywood Boats, Bamboo Rafts, &c.
              _________________________________

              -- Professor of Boatology -- Junkomologist
              -- Macintosh kinda guy
              Friend of Wanda the Wonder Cat, 1991-1997.
              _________________________________
              ---
              [This E-mail scanned for viruses by friend.ly.net.]
            • honestjohn37
              Thanks Craig, The book you mention is out of print, but through Amazon I found one used; $70.00! I m hoping for lots of good info. After this summer, I m
              Message 6 of 17 , Jun 4, 2003
                Thanks Craig,
                The book you mention is out of print, but through Amazon I found one
                used; $70.00! I'm hoping for lots of good info. After this summer,
                I'm shipping this little 'jolle' to the Sand Francisco bay area where
                I hope to have lots of fun with it. I wonder if there will be many of
                its type on the bay.
                Honest John
                --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, craig o'donnell <dadadata@f...> wrote:
                > >Also, my Danish source named a top sail that was also sometimes used,
                > >would that entail a movable spar or would it rig to a spar lashed
                > >firmly to the masthead? It would surely look fine, but is probably a
                > >bit 'over the top', so to speak.
                >
                > Probably a spar lashed vertically to the mast but I can't be sure. I
                > think John Leather's SPRITSAILS AND LUGSAILS has a drawing of this
                > boat.
                > --
                > Craig O'Donnell
                > Sinepuxent Ancestors & Boats
                > <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~fassitt/>
                > The Proa FAQ <http://boat-links.com/proafaq.html>
                > The Cheap Pages <http://www2.friend.ly.net/~dadadata/>
                > Sailing Canoes, Polytarp Sails, Bamboo, Chinese Junks,
                > American Proas, the Bolger Boat Honor Roll,
                > Plywood Boats, Bamboo Rafts, &c.
                > _________________________________
                >
                > -- Professor of Boatology -- Junkomologist
                > -- Macintosh kinda guy
                > Friend of Wanda the Wonder Cat, 1991-1997.
                > _________________________________
                > ---
                > [This E-mail scanned for viruses by friend.ly.net.]
              • jhkohnen@boat-links.com
                There s lots of good info in Leather s book, alright (I sure wish I d bought it back when it was in print!), but I don t recall if there are any specifics for
                Message 7 of 17 , Jun 4, 2003
                  There's lots of good info in Leather's book, alright (I sure wish I'd bought
                  it back when it was in print!), but I don't recall if there are any
                  specifics for Danish boats. You won't regret getting the book, anyway.

                  It looks like there were two ways of rigging a topsail for small Danish
                  boats: A lug topsail apparently hoisted with a halyard to a topmast fitted
                  through a spectacle iron at the masthead and with the heel fastened somehow
                  to a fitting on the forward side of the mast:

                  http://www.boat-links.com/images/Odin.gif

                  Or a jib-headed topsail, probably permanently laced to the topmast, probably
                  hoisted with a halyard through a hole in the masthead, with the heel lashed
                  to the mast:

                  http://www.boat-links.com/images/Snekkerston.gif

                  I'd go with the latter and, indeed, I'm probably going to make a similar
                  setup for my boat someday, because it's a slug in light breezes. In both
                  cases, the topsail sheet would go through a hole in the peak of the sprit,
                  or a small block or fairlead mounted there, and back to a cleat near the
                  heel of the sprit.

                  Here are some pictures of Danish spritsail boats to give you inspiration.
                  All the illustrations are from an English translation of a work by Christien
                  Nielsen, published in the US of A by Int'l Marine as Wooden Boat Designs.
                  Unfortunately, Nielsen doesn't go into the details of the rigging of the
                  boats. :o(

                  http://www.boat-links.com/images/Odin-1.jpg

                  http://www.boat-links.com/images/Odin-2.jpg

                  http://www.boat-links.com/images/Snekkerston.gif

                  I'd guess that your boat might be unique on SF Bay, but there are lots of
                  strange and exotic boats down there, so don't be surprised to find a Danish
                  Jolle club there! ;o) Where and when was your boat built? Maybe I can find
                  something about the type in Nielsen's book.

                  On Wed, 04 Jun 2003 12:51:55 -0000, Honest John wrote:
                  > Thanks Craig,
                  > The book you mention is out of print, but through Amazon I found one
                  > used; $70.00! I'm hoping for lots of good info. After this summer,
                  > I'm shipping this little 'jolle' to the Sand Francisco bay area where
                  > I hope to have lots of fun with it. I wonder if there will be many of
                  > its type on the bay.

                  --
                  John <jkohnen@...>
                  http://www.boat-links.com/
                  "Necessity is the mother of invention" is a silly proverb.
                  "Necessity is the mother of futile dodges" is much nearer the truth.
                  <Alfred North Whitehead>
                • craig o'donnell
                  ... Fishing boats in North Carolina used a topsail over spritsail as part of the normal rig; they had long poles on which the topsail was tied, and then the
                  Message 8 of 17 , Jun 5, 2003
                    >I'd go with the latter and, indeed, I'm probably going to make a similar
                    >setup for my boat someday, because it's a slug in light breezes. In both
                    >cases, the topsail sheet would go through a hole in the peak of the sprit,
                    >or a small block or fairlead mounted there, and back to a cleat near the
                    >heel of the sprit.

                    Fishing boats in North Carolina used a topsail over spritsail as part
                    of the normal rig; they had long poles on which the topsail was tied,
                    and then the poles were lashed to the mast. I don't have much more
                    detail than this however.

                    The Cheap Pages (somewhere - use the search function) have a link to
                    Conor O'Brien's simplified gaff-topsail, which may be adaptable to a
                    spritsail with a little thought. His point is that the topsail must
                    be attached and raised with the main down - as opposed to the big
                    boat style of sending the topsail "up". This is sensible on a small
                    boat or one without a host of burly fishermen on board to do all this
                    "rig"amarole and amounts to reefing before leaving the beach or dock.
                    --
                    Craig O'Donnell
                    Sinepuxent Ancestors & Boats
                    <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~fassitt/>
                    The Proa FAQ <http://boat-links.com/proafaq.html>
                    The Cheap Pages <http://www2.friend.ly.net/~dadadata/>
                    Sailing Canoes, Polytarp Sails, Bamboo, Chinese Junks,
                    American Proas, the Bolger Boat Honor Roll,
                    Plywood Boats, Bamboo Rafts, &c.
                    _________________________________

                    -- Professor of Boatology -- Junkomologist
                    -- Macintosh kinda guy
                    Friend of Wanda the Wonder Cat, 1991-1997.
                    _________________________________
                    ---
                    [This E-mail scanned for viruses by friend.ly.net.]
                  • jhkohnen@boat-links.com
                    Not all that long ago (#157) Wooden Boat ran an article by William Garden about the topsail he rigged up for his peapod. The topsail is permanantly laced to a
                    Message 9 of 17 , Jun 6, 2003
                      Not all that long ago (#157) Wooden Boat ran an article by William Garden
                      about the topsail he rigged up for his peapod. The topsail is permanantly
                      laced to a "jackyard" that is hoisted with a halyard through a bee-hole in
                      the masthead, the jackyard extends far enough below where the halyard is
                      connected so that it can be lashed to the sprit, near the mast. The topsail
                      sheet goes through a bee-hole in the peak end of the sprit and back to a
                      cleat near the heel of the sprit. Garden, no longer a young man, raises and
                      lowers the topsail while afloat, though I'd want to have lots of practice
                      doing the chore on the beach before attempting it while sailing. This is the
                      setup I'm going to use on my skiff someday (I've got the hole in the
                      masthead drilled anyway!). Here's a pic of Garden's peapod:

                      http://www.boat-links.com/images/GardenTopsail.jpg

                      On Thu, 5 Jun 2003 08:39:52 -0400, COD wrote:
                      > ...
                      > Fishing boats in North Carolina used a topsail over spritsail as part
                      > of the normal rig; they had long poles on which the topsail was tied,
                      > and then the poles were lashed to the mast. I don't have much more
                      > detail than this however.
                      >
                      > The Cheap Pages (somewhere - use the search function) have a link to
                      > Conor O'Brien's simplified gaff-topsail, which may be adaptable to a
                      > spritsail with a little thought. His point is that the topsail must
                      > be attached and raised with the main down - as opposed to the big
                      > boat style of sending the topsail "up". This is sensible on a small
                      > boat or one without a host of burly fishermen on board to do all this
                      > "rig"amarole and amounts to reefing before leaving the beach or dock.

                      --
                      John <jkohnen@...>
                      http://www.boat-links.com/
                      A facility for quotation covers the absence of original thought.
                      <Lord Peter Wimsey>
                    • craig o'donnell
                      ... Ah, right. I remember thinking it was a really swell writeup. -- Craig O Donnell Sinepuxent Ancestors & Boats
                      Message 10 of 17 , Jun 7, 2003
                        >Not all that long ago (#157) Wooden Boat ran an article by William Garden
                        >about the topsail he rigged up for his peapod. The topsail is permanantly
                        >laced to a "jackyard" that is hoisted with a halyard through a bee-hole in
                        >the masthead, the jackyard extends far enough below where the halyard is
                        >connected so that it can be lashed to the sprit, near the mast. The topsail
                        >sheet goes through a bee-hole in the peak end of the sprit and back to a
                        >cleat near the heel of the sprit.

                        Ah, right. I remember thinking it was a really swell writeup.

                        --
                        Craig O'Donnell
                        Sinepuxent Ancestors & Boats
                        <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~fassitt/>
                        The Proa FAQ <http://boat-links.com/proafaq.html>
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                        _________________________________

                        -- Professor of Boatology -- Junkomologist
                        -- Macintosh kinda guy
                        Friend of Wanda the Wonder Cat, 1991-1997.
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