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Re: [bolger] Washing Machine

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  • jeff
    We already own one for the Wyoming we are building. They work okay so to speak. Keep the loads small and things actually get clean. They can use a fair
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 1, 2003
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      We already own one for the Wyoming we are building. They work okay so to
      speak. Keep the loads small and things actually get clean. They can use a
      fair amount of water but energy wise, they do it for free. Except of course
      the tea kettle for warm water. Better than washing in a bucket!

      Jeff

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "harryjak" <welshman@...>
      To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2003 3:17 PM
      Subject: [bolger] Washing Machine


      > I just ran across this advertised in a magazine
      >
      > http://www.laundry-alternative.com/
      >
      > Those comtemplating a cruise in their Bolger Boat with limited power
      > options might be interested. Just the ticket for a Wyoming or Insolent
      > 60 or AS 29 or-----. Just the ticket that is if it works. Anybody got
      > any feed back on it.
      >
      >
      > HJ
      >
      >
      >
      > Bolger rules!!!
      > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
      > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
      > - add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts and <snip> away
      > - To order plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA,
      01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
      > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
    • Bruce Hector
      What s wrong with throw your ditty in a soapy bucket, tossing it in a minnow trap, and towing it for a while for a rinse cycle? Bruce Hector
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 1, 2003
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        What's wrong with throw your ditty in a soapy bucket, tossing it in a
        minnow trap, and towing it for a while for a rinse cycle?

        Bruce Hector
      • soussouchew
        ... in a ... Answer: Probably nothing, except that is basically how I use to collect diatoms and other microscopic marine life for study in my biology class.
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 1, 2003
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          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Hector"
          <bruce_hector@h...> wrote:
          > What's wrong with throw your ditty in a soapy bucket, tossing it
          in a
          > minnow trap, and towing it for a while for a rinse cycle?
          >
          > Bruce Hector

          Answer: Probably nothing, except that is basically how I use to
          collect diatoms and other microscopic marine life for study in my
          biology class.

          Vince
        • Paul Lefebvre
          I once read about a jury-rigged washing machine used by troops on pacific islands in WWII. Don t remember details, in fact not even sure any were given, but it
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 2, 2003
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            I once read about a jury-rigged washing machine used by troops on pacific
            islands in WWII. Don't remember details, in fact not even sure any were
            given, but it was basically a barrel with some sort of wave-driven agitator.
            They'd throw their clothes in and put it in the right spot in or near the
            surf zone, and let the waves agitate their clothes; claimed it did a great
            job. It ought to be possible to rig up a device like this on a voyaging
            boat - why wear out your arms cranking when your boat bobs in the waves
            24/7? Might take a bit longer, but who cares when the energy is free. Surely
            some of the clever long-distance cruisers out there have come up with a way
            to do this. I suppose the best clothes-washing energy is to be had offshore,
            where water is rationed and it'd be hard to hang things out to dry..... but
            it seems one could get around this with a bit of planning - tank up, then go
            for a daysail and wash your clothes at the same time!

            Paul L, hoping the end is in sight for this cabin-fever!
          • Richard Spelling
            Wouldn t washing your close in salt water leave them, well, salty? ... From: Paul Lefebvre To: Sent: Wednesday,
            Message 5 of 9 , Apr 2, 2003
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              Wouldn't washing your close in salt water leave them, well, salty?

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Paul Lefebvre" <paul@...>
              To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Wednesday, April 02, 2003 8:24 AM
              Subject: RE: [bolger] Re: Washing Machine


              > I once read about a jury-rigged washing machine used by troops on pacific
              > islands in WWII. Don't remember details, in fact not even sure any were
              > given, but it was basically a barrel with some sort of wave-driven agitator.
              > They'd throw their clothes in and put it in the right spot in or near the
              > surf zone, and let the waves agitate their clothes; claimed it did a great
              > job. It ought to be possible to rig up a device like this on a voyaging
              > boat - why wear out your arms cranking when your boat bobs in the waves
              > 24/7? Might take a bit longer, but who cares when the energy is free. Surely
              > some of the clever long-distance cruisers out there have come up with a way
              > to do this. I suppose the best clothes-washing energy is to be had offshore,
              > where water is rationed and it'd be hard to hang things out to dry..... but
              > it seems one could get around this with a bit of planning - tank up, then go
              > for a daysail and wash your clothes at the same time!
              >
              > Paul L, hoping the end is in sight for this cabin-fever!
              >
              >
              >
              > Bolger rules!!!
              > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
              > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
              > - add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts and <snip> away
              > - To order plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
              > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
            • David Ryan
              ... When I was in school, I d went Baja California nearly every Winter break. Not a lot of clothing needed. But when our clothes threatened to stand up and
              Message 6 of 9 , Apr 2, 2003
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                >Wouldn't washing your close in salt water leave them, well, salty?

                When I was in school, I'd went Baja California nearly every Winter
                break. Not a lot of clothing needed.

                But when our clothes threatened to stand up and walk away on their
                own, we did have good luck putting our grungies in a 5 gallon pail
                with water, detergent and a lid. An hour on a washboarded road did
                the trick for agitation. We'd rinse in the ocean. I've heard of good
                results for a pail left on the deck of a boat underway.

                If you don't want salty clothes, stay ashore.

                -D

                --

                C.E.P.
                415 W.46th Street
                New York, New York 10036
                http://www.crumblingempire.com
                Mobile (646) 325-8325
                Office (212) 247-0296
              • bluesky_whitecaps
                The one thing to worry about is leaving the bucket in the water being pulled behind the boat. Don t pump the bilges or empty the holding tanks.
                Message 7 of 9 , Apr 2, 2003
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                  The one thing to worry about is leaving the bucket in the water being
                  pulled behind the boat. Don't pump the bilges or empty the holding
                  tanks.
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