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Re: to fiberglass or not to fiberglass?

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  • Bruce Hallman
    ... Dropping a yacht is different than dropping a Pointy Skiff. I dropped both my Tortoise [8ft], and my Michalak Roar [5 ft] and the fact that they
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 6, 2003
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      --- lon wells <lononriver@y...> wrote:

      > ...boat yard dropped a sea going yacht
      > and it cost them $10,000.00 to fix it,

      > > Simulate the dreaded on-water collision by
      > > dropping the boat from a height of six feet
      > > onto your driveway.

      Dropping a yacht is different than dropping
      a Pointy Skiff. <grin>

      I dropped both my Tortoise [8ft],
      and my Michalak Roar [5 ft] and the
      fact that they survived gives me
      peace of mind that they are strong.

      Proof testing.

      Last night, I dropped my Micro Navigator two
      feet while I was jacking it up on its side.
      {The piece of window trim [glued with polyurethane
      glue <g>] parted way under the stress of my come-a-long
      cable jack.} I was glad I didn't get squished, and
      the neighbor came over to check on me due to the
      loud boom, but there was not a scratch on the boat.

      Plus, I feel better now knowing that the side to
      bottom chine joints withstood the stress.
    • proaconstrictor
      Some Bolger skiffs have really heavy bends in their panels. I don t think that a panel breaking during the bend is unthinkable. Once the panels are in place,
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 6, 2003
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        Some Bolger skiffs have really heavy bends in their panels. I don't
        think that a panel breaking during the bend is unthinkable. Once the
        panels are in place, however, it takes relatively modest strenght for
        them to live out a useful life. I wouldn't worry too much about the
        strength of the resultant boat, particularly if it is expected to be
        used only in situations you could swim out of.

        My advice would continue to be to find ways to make the panel
        stronger, rather than finding ways to shake the boat apart.



        --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Hallman" <brucehallman@y...>
        wrote:
        > --- lon wells <lononriver@y...> wrote:
        >
        > > ...boat yard dropped a sea going yacht
        > > and it cost them $10,000.00 to fix it,
        >
        > > > Simulate the dreaded on-water collision by
        > > > dropping the boat from a height of six feet
        > > > onto your driveway.
        >
        > Dropping a yacht is different than dropping
        > a Pointy Skiff. <grin>
        >
        > I dropped both my Tortoise [8ft],
        > and my Michalak Roar [5 ft] and the
        > fact that they survived gives me
        > peace of mind that they are strong.
        >
        > Proof testing.
        >
        > Last night, I dropped my Micro Navigator two
        > feet while I was jacking it up on its side.
        > {The piece of window trim [glued with polyurethane
        > glue <g>] parted way under the stress of my come-a-long
        > cable jack.} I was glad I didn't get squished, and
        > the neighbor came over to check on me due to the
        > loud boom, but there was not a scratch on the boat.
        >
        > Plus, I feel better now knowing that the side to
        > bottom chine joints withstood the stress.
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