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steaming woods

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  • pauldayau <wattleweedooseeds@bigpond.com>
    This weekend i vebeen playing with a steamer and bending some wood . most of my wood is old, salvaged stuff. i had no luck with douglas fir, of any thickness,
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 3, 2003
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      This weekend i vebeen playing with a steamer and bending some wood .
      most of my wood is old, salvaged stuff.
      i had no luck with douglas fir, of any thickness, baltic Pine all
      snapped. a bit of luck with maranti and ramin.
      i thgought I was doing something wrong until i found some scraps of
      MIchigan white Cedar given to me 10 years ago . A piece 3mm thick ,
      12" long bent into a hoop staight away, a piece 3/4" thick bent like
      rubber as well.
      our local Jarrah was steamed for 2 hours without looking like
      bending.
      next step is to cut some green trees and try bending them.
      This weekend i bought a small sawmill in bits .
      This boat /wood thing is starting to get a bit serious.
      has anyone had any experience with any of these woods?
      cheers paul
    • Richard Barnes
      Most of our domestic hardwoods will bend OK if green and /or steamed. Many of them won t keep the bend like you installed it though. SYP will bend remarkably
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 3, 2003
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        Most of our domestic hardwoods will bend OK if green and /or steamed. Many of them won't keep the bend like you installed it though. SYP will bend remarkably well if split or sawn with the grain when really green. (Don't let the log dry before you saw it.)

        In general kiln dried stuff is not as good as air dried for steam bending.
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: pauldayau <wattleweedooseeds@...>
        To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, March 03, 2003 6:10 AM
        Subject: [bolger] steaming woods


        This weekend i vebeen playing with a steamer and bending some wood .
        most of my wood is old, salvaged stuff.
        i had no luck with douglas fir, of any thickness, baltic Pine all
        snapped. a bit of luck with maranti and ramin.
        i thgought I was doing something wrong until i found some scraps of
        MIchigan white Cedar given to me 10 years ago . A piece 3mm thick ,
        12" long bent into a hoop staight away, a piece 3/4" thick bent like
        rubber as well.
        our local Jarrah was steamed for 2 hours without looking like
        bending.
        next step is to cut some green trees and try bending them.
        This weekend i bought a small sawmill in bits .
        This boat /wood thing is starting to get a bit serious.
        has anyone had any experience with any of these woods?
        cheers paul


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      • Frank Sarnighausen
        Paul: To obtain very tight bends just by steaming is a bit difficult. Tables show that Douglas fir(Psudossuga menziesii) of one inch thickness can be bent
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 3, 2003
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          Paul:
          To obtain very tight bends just by steaming is a bit difficult. Tables
          show that Douglas fir(Psudossuga menziesii) of one inch thickness can be
          bent to a radius of 33 inches after steaming.
          Ramin (Gonystylus bancanus) will not do better than 37, white cedar will go
          to 18 inches, Jarrah (Eucalyptus marginata) will stop at 39.
          Of course you can achieve much smaller radii with thinner wood which you
          can later glue together, forming a lamination.
          Fairly good wood for bending is Ash, Beech, Birch, Chestnut, Elm (the tables
          say you can achive 9,5 inches of radius under the above conditions), Lime,
          Oak, Sycamore and some others.
          Steam bending should be done after "cooking" the wood for one hour per
          inch thickness, in a closed horizontal box (wood is OK) with steam
          saturated with moisture. To make shure it is, place some dishes or cans
          with water inside the box.
          I boil the water in a 5-gallon can, with a piece of pipe sticking out of the
          filler hole, directly into the pox, placed about a meter off the ground, on
          sawhorses. You can fire with gas , coal, wood, electricity, whatever.
          The perfect way to distribute steam inside the box is making a manifold of a
          lenght of metal pipe with holes for the steam to emerge.
          Keep the box slightly inclined and make a drain hole for condensation at one
          end.
          In case you want better than all this, there is always chemistry :
          Problem is it stinks, is unhealthy if no proper measures of protection are
          taken and you may run into problems with neighbors. You can plasticize
          wood and turn it into the consistence of leather, by immersion in gaseous
          anhydrus ammonia. This solvent diffuses into the cell structure and
          dissolves the lignine. After the wood is bent, the solvent will evaporate
          out of the wood and the components of it will solidify again in its new
          mutual position.
          This system can only be applied in a closed-cirquit installation, with
          steel piping and good valves, the spent gas being released into a large
          volume of water.

          Frank - Brazil
        • proaconstrictor <proaconstrictor@yahoo.c
          You can get really tight radius bends in wood that is backed with a strap. Most wood will give well under compression, and break under tension, so the strap,
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 3, 2003
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            You can get really tight radius bends in wood that is backed with a
            strap. Most wood will give well under compression, and break under
            tension, so the strap, steel or whatever, will hold the weak tension
            side together. This might sound complex, but a jig consisting of
            nothing much more than two wooden hadles the length apart of the
            pieces you will bend, with a strap between them will instantly grab,
            and bend very tight radius'. Sometimes when bendign over an iron,
            nothing more than masking tape on the tension side will do wonders,
            but you can't put that in steam box.
          • andy wilson
            Spotted Gum,Blackbutt and Sydney bluegum [not Calif. growth] all steam well at 1 inch plank thickness/hr steaming if GREEN. You could try soaking dried
            Message 5 of 5 , Mar 3, 2003
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              Spotted Gum,Blackbutt and Sydney bluegum [not Calif. growth] all steam well at 1 inch plank thickness/hr steaming if GREEN. You could try soaking dried hardwoods for days first. Who knows? Get steamed up! Andy
              "pauldayau <wattleweedooseeds@...>" <wattleweedooseeds@...> wrote:This weekend i vebeen playing with a steamer and bending some wood .
              most of my wood is old, salvaged stuff.
              i had no luck with douglas fir, of any thickness, baltic Pine all
              snapped. a bit of luck with maranti and ramin.
              i thgought I was doing something wrong until i found some scraps of
              MIchigan white Cedar given to me 10 years ago . A piece 3mm thick ,
              12" long bent into a hoop staight away, a piece 3/4" thick bent like
              rubber as well.
              our local Jarrah was steamed for 2 hours without looking like
              bending.
              next step is to cut some green trees and try bending them.
              This weekend i bought a small sawmill in bits .
              This boat /wood thing is starting to get a bit serious.
              has anyone had any experience with any of these woods?
              cheers paul


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              Bolger rules!!!
              - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
              - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
              - add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts and <snip> away
              - To order plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
              - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



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