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Thomaston galley?

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  • s_paskey <s_paskey@yahoo.com>
    I ve been rereading the chapter on the TG in Small Boats, and I m impressed by PCB s comment that he has more than once covered 25 miles in a day by rowing in
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 20, 2003
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      I've been rereading the chapter on the TG in Small Boats, and I'm
      impressed by PCB's comment that he has more than once covered 25
      miles in a day by rowing in the morning calm and sailing when the
      wind came up.

      Granted, other small boats could do that, but how many have the
      center of the boat free for sleeping aboard under a cockpit tent?
      Could be a great boat for minimal weekend cruises for one without an
      engine. (I'm thinking about the Wye River and other nooks and
      crannies around the Chesapeake.)

      If anyone out there has built, sailed, or rowed a TG, I'd be most
      interesting in hearing about your experiences.

      Thanks!

      Steve Paskey
      Takoma Park, MD
    • pseudospark <shansen@tiac.net>
      I ve seen lots of little snippets here and there about the TG but I ve never seen any detail save the little line drawing that s on Payson s site under
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 20, 2003
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        I've seen lots of little snippets here and there about the TG but
        I've never seen any detail save the little line drawing that's on
        Payson's site under non-instant boats. So, I'd be interested in
        knowing more about this boat too.

        Steve Hansen


        > If anyone out there has built, sailed, or rowed a TG, I'd be most
        > interesting in hearing about your experiences.
      • pvanderwaart <pvanderw@optonline.net>
        One year at the Mystic Small weekend, a guy brought a brand-new, Payson-built Thomaston Galley. I got to sail it and, unfortunately, hit a rock with the
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 20, 2003
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          One year at the Mystic Small weekend, a guy brought a brand-new,
          Payson-built Thomaston Galley. I got to sail it and, unfortunately,
          hit a rock with the leeboard and cracked the leeboard brace. One of
          my more embarrassing moments. It did mean that I had to row it upwind
          for a couple hundred yards to get back to the dock.

          It's actually a pretty steep v-bottom, but I don't remember it being
          especially tippy. It has good beam, so I think it wouldn't easily tip
          farther than enough to get the chine in the water. It ran off on a
          broad reach in grand style. I found it awkward to have to get the
          sheet looped around a cleat to leeward when tacking or jibing, and I
          would probably go to two sheets, like jib.

          I can't really comment on the rowing, except that the seating
          position was good. I don't row enough to have a standard of
          comparison.

          I think it's a very clever boat. You might want to avoid a chop that
          she stuck the low bow into, but other than that, I think she could
          handle quite a sea. If she ever got full of water, she'd be a handful
          because, as you noted, she's quite roomy.

          What alternatives would you consider? Cartopper would probably be
          considered as being "in the same class" in BolgerSpeak.

          Peter
        • s_paskey <s_paskey@yahoo.com>
          Thanks for the comments, Peter. I do like cartopper, though I wish one could trim the boat comfortably for an oarsman with 1 passenger. I don t mind a small
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 24, 2003
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            Thanks for the comments, Peter. I do like cartopper, though I wish
            one could trim the boat comfortably for an oarsman with 1 passenger.
            I don't mind a small trailer, and unless one actually needs to cartop
            the boat, the TG's extra length would seem to be a great advantage.
            Faster hull speed, and more room to build in compartments for
            bouyancy and gear storage.

            As for other alternatives, I'd consider anything that sails well,
            rows respectably, and has enough room for a tall person to sleep
            comfortably under a cockpit tent. PCB might suggest his Camper
            (#640), the 18-foot birdwatcher-style skiff, but I remain resistant
            to the idea of the lexan house. It's not about the temperature --
            when the weather's pleasant, I don't want to sit in a cabin.
          • Bruce Hector <bruce_hector@hotmail.com>
            Re; the Birdwatcher. Have you seen the conversion to a junk rig in the current duckworks? Looks pretty good. You stand anytime to have your ears in the breeze,
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 24, 2003
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              Re; the Birdwatcher. Have you seen the conversion to a junk rig in
              the current duckworks? Looks pretty good. You stand anytime to have
              your ears in the breeze, I'll bet a higher than average or folding
              helm seat could be fanagled in to sit and steer with the wind in your
              teeth.

              I think its
              http://www.duckworks.com

              Bruce Hector
            • Chuck Leinweber
              Close, Bruce, but no cigar: http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/articles/birdwatcher/junk.htm Re; the Birdwatcher. Have you seen the conversion to a junk rig in
              Message 6 of 9 , Feb 24, 2003
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                Close, Bruce, but no cigar:

                http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/articles/birdwatcher/junk.htm

                Re; the Birdwatcher. Have you seen the conversion to a junk rig in
                the current duckworks? Looks pretty good. You stand anytime to have
                your ears in the breeze, I'll bet a higher than average or folding
                helm seat could be fanagled in to sit and steer with the wind in your
                teeth.

                I think its
                http://www.duckworks.com

                Bruce Hector




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • soussouchew <vachew@voyager.net>
                ... sleep ... Camper ... JUNEBUG
                Message 7 of 9 , Feb 24, 2003
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                  --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "s_paskey <s_paskey@y...>"
                  <s_paskey@y...> wrote:

                  >
                  > As for other alternatives, I'd consider anything that sails well,
                  > rows respectably, and has enough room for a tall person to
                  sleep
                  > comfortably under a cockpit tent. PCB might suggest his
                  Camper
                  > (#640), the 18-foot birdwatcher-style skiff, but I remain resistant
                  > to the idea of the lexan house. It's not about the temperature --
                  > when the weather's pleasant, I don't want to sit in a cabin.

                  JUNEBUG
                • Ford and Mary Ann Walton
                  If you want something bigger than Cartopper and don t mind a trailer, take a look at Gypsy. She is 16 ft., mainly a sailboat, but rows well, too. Cartopper
                  Message 8 of 9 , Feb 27, 2003
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                    If you want something bigger than Cartopper and don't mind a trailer,
                    take a look at Gypsy. She is 16 ft., mainly a sailboat, but rows well,
                    too. Cartopper is actually a reduced version.

                    Ford Walton



                    "s_paskey " wrote:
                    >
                    > Thanks for the comments, Peter. I do like cartopper, though I wish
                    > one could trim the boat comfortably for an oarsman with 1 passenger.
                    > I don't mind a small trailer, and unless one actually needs to cartop
                    > the boat, the TG's extra length would seem to be a great advantage.
                    > Faster hull speed, and more room to build in compartments for
                    > bouyancy and gear storage.
                    >
                    > As for other alternatives, I'd consider anything that sails well,
                    > rows respectably, and has enough room for a tall person to sleep
                    > comfortably under a cockpit tent. PCB might suggest his Camper
                    > (#640), the 18-foot birdwatcher-style skiff, but I remain resistant
                    > to the idea of the lexan house. It's not about the temperature --
                    > when the weather's pleasant, I don't want to sit in a cabin.
                    >
                    > Bolger rules!!!
                    > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
                    > - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
                    > - add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts and <snip> away
                    > - To order plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
                    > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    > - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    >
                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  • Harry James
                    I used to think that the cartopper was a reduced Gypsy also, but they really have only a few things in common, the are double chined plywood, they have the
                    Message 9 of 9 , Feb 27, 2003
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                      I used to think that the cartopper was a reduced Gypsy also, but they really
                      have only a few things in common, the are double chined plywood, they have
                      the same rig they are designed by Bolger and they are sailing dingy's.

                      They are 2 entirely different boats and don't really look alike when next to
                      each other. Gypsy has a lot flatter run, will plane the dagger board is
                      conventionally located. The Cartopper has a lot more rocker, and fatter for
                      her length with more freeboard is "I think" a better looking boat when next
                      to a Gypsy, and is probably able to handle worse weather and wouldn't plane
                      unless being towed empty. The Cartopper also has that unconventional small
                      center board located forward, with the rudder sharing lateral plane area.

                      HJ


                      > If you want something bigger than Cartopper and don't mind a trailer,
                      > take a look at Gypsy. She is 16 ft., mainly a sailboat, but rows well,
                      > too. Cartopper is actually a reduced version.
                      >
                      > Ford Walton
                      >
                      > "
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