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Re: Bilge pump, wiring/voltage questions.

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  • John Cupp <caj@kfalls.net>
    Bruce try to stay away of 120V on your boat unless you have 120V at dockside then get a big bilge pump for those extended times away from the boat. See f you
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 5, 2003
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      Bruce try to stay away of 120V on your boat unless you have 120V at
      dockside then get a big bilge pump for those extended times away from
      the boat. See f you can find a new wrecked RV trailer for all the
      electrical systems. Then you can have dual power lights and a circuit
      box to die for. You may even be able to save the frame to make a boat
      trailer. You can buy them for a song because most scrap dealers think
      they are more work than profit.

      With all the 12V devices out there now why would you need AC on your
      boat. I buy fuel for my pickup at a Pilot truck stop and they have
      everything you could imagine for trucker to run on 12V DC. I even saw
      a 12V deep fryer. can't you imagine some guy cruising down I-5 making
      French fries in his 18 wheeler! I even saw some 12V white LED cab
      lights that all you have to do is connect the wires. They even have
      12V color TV/VCR's with radios so you can get the play by play on
      KGO.

      You also can go the route of have a portable gen set. I have a small
      Honda that measures about 20" X 15" X 12" with the handle it looks
      like a tool box but it can charge 12V DC batteries and it also puts
      out 120 V AC for lights and a TV ON the lake here when I would go
      fishing I could just use my trolling motor and when it was time to go
      home I would hook up the Honda on the 12V side and run at full power
      all the way home. It uses to much gas though about every ten hours
      you have to add a quart and check the oil.


      John




      --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Hallman <brucehallman@y...>"
      <brucehallman@y...> wrote:
      > I am beginning to think through the wiring
      > for my Micro Navigator project, [Before I
      > cover up every wiring chase.]
      >
      > As I plan on having the boat 'wired' for
      > comfort, two RV batteries, charged
      > with one (or two) 50 watt photovoltaic cells...
      > ...with an AC converter. So I can have a TV
      > for watching SF Giants games in McCovey Cove
      > waiting for the next Barry Bonds splash hit.
      >
      > Pricing light fixtures, 110V florescent bulbs
      > and fixtures are cheaper by a factor of 10 than
      > the 12V florescent light fixtures. Would I be
      > nuts to have 110V lighting circuits in the boat?
      >
      > Also, I am guessing that installing an automatic
      > bilge pump would be cheap insurance. Anyone
      > have ideas and suggestions about this?
      >
      > As for navigation lights, I need port, starboard, stern light
      > and an anchor light on top of the main mast, right?
      >
      > Does the stern light belong on top of the mizzen mast, or on an
      > independent light pole on the stern?
    • sctree
      My two cents, base only on my experience; Batteries... I vehad good luck with gel batteries. Yes, I know they cost more and there are special charging
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 5, 2003
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        My two cents, base only on my experience;

        Batteries... I'vehad good luck with gel batteries. Yes, I know they cost
        more and there are special charging requirements, but .... they don't
        spill, leak, or fume, very nice as I assume you'll be living "in" the
        battery compartment. They are very tolerant of long term non-use, low
        temperature storage, and are vibration resistant. Very easy to stow away
        a second backup battery that you can swap out when the juice goes down.

        Wiring chase .. Are you building in pvc pipe chases? Cheap and neat.
        Make em much bigger dia. than you think you'll need. For gosh sakes used
        the tinned ancor marine grade wire, and marine grade adhesive-shrink
        waterproof terminals.

        Nav lights... You need port and starboard sidelights (or a combo) plus a
        stern light which should be low for sailing. AND a white masthead
        (steaming) light facing the forward 112.5 degrees, which does not have
        to be at the top of the mast, but it does need to be at least a meter (I
        think) above the sidelights for use when under power.. A sailboat under
        power IS a powerboat. The anchor light is another additional light.
        You could go with a masthead tricolor. Big bucks, wiring up the mast is
        tougher to do and maintain. Also, if you go out on the Bay at night
        you'll notice a tricolor on the masthead of a small boat does not stand
        out as well as deck mounted nav lights.....

        Anchor light... can be stowed below and hoisted on a halyard when
        necessary. Davis makes a nice low amp (0.074A) auto off in daylight
        "Mini Mega Light" with a 12v lighter plug. They claim a 1000 continuous
        hours on an 80Ah battery. Visible 2 nm, but not USCG approved as an
        official anchor light..

        As nice as solar sounds it's much easier and cheaper to take the battery
        home and charge it up. (Remember that non leaking, no-spill, non fuming,
        ok to lay it on it's side gel battery?)

        120volt and salt air/water is not a good combo. Don't you lose a lot of
        juice going through an inverter? How much light do you need in that
        cabin? And how big is that TV? There are small low draw 12v TV's out there.

        Bilge pump... Tough decision, you'd need something pretty big, with a
        dependable switch and a good battery that was mounted high to keep up
        with much of a hull breach, then how long would that battery last?. A
        small slow leak would just let water slosh around as there is not a sump
        area for the water to collect into. By the time she was down enough for
        the pump to do much, I'd think someone at the marina (or you if you were
        aboard) would notice... So, Idaknow...

        So much to decide............

        Good luck,

        Rick


        Bruce Hallman wrote:

        > I am beginning to think through the wiring
        > for my Micro Navigator project, [Before I
        > cover up every wiring chase.]
        >
        > As I plan on having the boat 'wired' for
        > comfort, two RV batteries, charged
        > with one (or two) 50 watt photovoltaic cells...
        > ...with an AC converter. So I can have a TV
        > for watching SF Giants games in McCovey Cove
        > waiting for the next Barry Bonds splash hit.
        >
        > Pricing light fixtures, 110V florescent bulbs
        > and fixtures are cheaper by a factor of 10 than
        > the 12V florescent light fixtures. Would I be
        > nuts to have 110V lighting circuits in the boat?
        >
        > Also, I am guessing that installing an automatic
        > bilge pump would be cheap insurance. Anyone
        > have ideas and suggestions about this?
        >
        > As for navigation lights, I need port, starboard, stern light
        > and an anchor light on top of the main mast, right?
        >
        > Does the stern light belong on top of the mizzen mast, or on an
        > independent light pole on the stern?
        >
        >
        > Bolger rules!!!
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