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  • Susan Davis
    Phil Bolger & Friends, Inc. Boat Designers, P.O. Box 1209 66 Atlantic St. FAX 978-282-1349 Gloucester, MA 01930-1627, U.S.A. Susan Davis and David Ryan
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 30, 2002
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      Phil Bolger & Friends,
      Inc.
      Boat Designers, P.O. Box
      1209
      66 Atlantic St. FAX
      978-282-1349
      Gloucester, MA 01930-1627,
      U.S.A.


      Susan Davis and David Ryan 11/26/02

      Dear David and Susan,

      Just to let you know that we have done some work on the INSOLENT-60
      design.
      Though we're embarrassed by the long delivery of this (and other) plans,
      it
      does benefit by repeated reexaminations allowed (forced) by the delays.
      Extended fermentation is indeed enhancing her. We have:

      1. Made the house conform better to the main sheer, with a great
      improvement
      in its looks, now reasonably classical -- long low `knock-about' plus
      an
      airy matching house.

      2. Rearranged the design of the hinges of the end sections to be much
      less
      of a visual excrescence.

      3. Shortened the main hull slightly, lengthening the bow end to the same
      overall length, to allow the towing vehicle to make much sharper
      turns
      to at least an 80 degree angle of trailer-tongue to tractor-vehicle
      without crunching the boat.

      4. Reverted to a sharp stern, because of easier folding geometries after
      all, also further de-emphasizing her plywood-based hard-corner shape,
      improve performance with a stern overload, to keep the stern from
      being
      overloaded with friends, and to keep this end as structurally light
      as
      possible for folding.

      5. Reduced the maximum (upright!) draft with maximum keel extension to
      5'6"
      -- more useable in coastal environs and with less shift of center of
      lateral plane between full down and partial up. We have adequate
      lateral
      plane area while reducing the overall stresses of ballast wings vs.
      keel
      vs. trunk vs. hull.
      The test keel's geometry has been tested in FL on the cradle and we
      expect any day to hear how the sailing tests went. There were some
      fabrication and assembly problems, correction of which will save
      concerns
      about the heavier INSOLENT keel.

      6. Worked out an option (in addition to the more casual single-hander
      balanced
      club jib) for a "speed" double jib rig on the foremast, with a
      loose-footed
      jib set to the stemhead and an overlapped and an overlapping
      forestaysail
      tacked down on the weather side to form an efficient leading edge
      slat for
      the foresail. Sheeting these sails will require a couple of winches,
      and
      their use implies at least one hand in or near her bow section.
      Still this
      option is compatible with the original balanced-club jib for use when
      short-handed or not that ambitious. The object was to get as much,
      and as
      powerful, a sail plan as possible within the tight dictates of
      folding
      everything for trailering. In that connection, we're also proposing
      to
      give the fore and mainsails a large roach with full battens, or
      possibly
      just very long battens, to bring the total (light air!) sail area
      that can
      be set to perhaps near 1200 square feet.

      7. Added shrouds to both masts, mainly to stiffen them against the pull
      of the
      staysails. These shrouds likely will have to have considerable drift
      aft
      and will limit the squaring-out of the booms, but since with her
      characteristics she will almost if not quite always gain by tacking
      downwind this ought not to be a problem.

      8. We have also made some alterations in the cabin arrangement with
      which the
      added breadth improve the accomodations a lot. Master'double seems
      to be
      around 40" wide/tight. Long skinny galley. Private head. Saloon
      for 6+
      plus two reasonably sized single bunks in `tunnels' flanking the
      foremast.
      Mostly just 5' of headroom throughout with a few more some places.
      True
      spine-stretching only either horizontally, under open hatches along
      centerline, or `outside'. All this is a direct consequence of her
      being
      an advanced `sporting device' able to do 70 MPH in traffic....

      9. Plus this and that identifying details to be dealth with.

      We are gleeful about this insolent project! Sincerely,

      Phil

      --
      Susan Davis <sue@...>
    • brucehallman
      ... This is really exciting! I was just revisting the simple transition from David s Teal in post #29 of this group, to now an INSOLENT-60.
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 1, 2002
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        --- In bolger@y..., Susan Davis <futabachan@y...> wrote:
        > Dear David and Susan,
        >
        > Just to let you know that we have
        > done some work on the INSOLENT-60
        > design.
        ...
        > Sincerely,
        >
        > Phil

        This is really exciting!

        I was just revisting the
        simple transition from David's
        'Teal' in post #29 of this group,
        to now an INSOLENT-60.

        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger/message/29
      • David Ryan
        ... (BBBB is for Bolger Boat Building Brotherhood.) That Bruce Hallman would go digging around for my first post is a pretty good indication of the comradery
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 2, 2002
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          >This is really exciting!
          >
          >I was just revisting the
          >simple transition from David's
          >'Teal' in post #29 of this group,
          >to now an INSOLENT-60.
          >
          >http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger/message/29


          (BBBB is for Bolger Boat Building Brotherhood.)

          That Bruce Hallman would go digging around for my first post is a
          pretty good indication of the comradery that we have here on this
          group. For every crumudgeon on the list who insists that our plywood
          dream will be dashed on the rocks of undervalued man-hours, noisy
          nights at anchor, poor windward performance, and low resale; there's
          always someone ready to counter post (usually one of the Bruces)
          that life is not measured in dollars and sense (sic) and that hours
          spent working hard on something you love rarely yield to any sort of
          spread-sheet analysis.

          Given the content of message 29 (above), I'm going to share with the
          group a note I sent to PCB&F last week.

          ********

          David Ryan
          190 South Fairview Ave
          Montauk, NY 11954

          Phil C. Bolger & Friends
          P.O. Box 1209
          Gloucester, MA 01930


          Dear Phil and Suzanne,

          Like countless others, when I first encountered your designs I was
          swept up in what can only be described as a fever. Before the paint
          was dry on my Teal I had already bought plans for the Light Scooner,
          and Gloucester Gull, as well as adding "New Instant Boats" and "Boats
          with an Open Mind" to my library.

          Somewhere in there I made Bob Wise's acquaintance. As my dreams of a
          "Big Bolger Box" began to take shape, Bob was a great reality check,
          as well as a source of encouragement, (his fundamental view being
          "Yes, it's really as easy as it looks. All you have to do it do it.)
          He also had cautionary tales of "Bolger dreams" gone wrong where the
          resulting boat was neither a Bolger, nor inexpensive, nor satisfying
          to the builder.

          Aside from our interest in boats, Bob and I also work in the same
          business. But Bob works at a much higher level than I do, and that's
          where this little story takes a funny twist.

          Earlier this Fall I was asked to consider a project that might
          involve production in Afghanistan. I knew Bob had been there last
          year, so I fired off an e-mail to him asking him for any advice he
          might have. The long and the short of it is that Bob will be working
          with me on this next project. I wouldn't go as far as saying he's
          come on board because we're both Bolger boat builders, but that
          didn't hurt! It has most certainly given us a common point of
          reference. Low budget filmmaking is a lot like low budget boat
          building - the key to success is being able to differentiate between
          the things you need to have and the things you would like to have. A
          degree of open-mindedness about what constitutes "need" vs. "want" is
          helpful, but as in boat-building, too much "open-mindedness" can
          quickly lead down the path to disappointment if is is not tempered by
          reality!

          As I said, Bob isn't coming along on this adventure because I've
          built a few of your designs. But I'm quite sure I never would have
          found my way to Bob if my first experiece (the Teal) had not been so
          encouraging! I'm sure his contribution to this next project is going
          to be invaluable, and at least some of the credit for that flows back
          to Gloucester.

          Yours,

          David

          ********

          From the first day, PCB had completely captured my imagination (see
          post #59 http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bolger/message/59 ) but I
          never would have dreamed of the path I began heading down as I
          started cobbling together that Teal. Along that path boat building
          and the resulting vessels have been frequently provided refuge when
          the weight and strain of work and life in general. Indeed, our
          decision to take on the I60 was a much a way to try and give
          ourselves something to be excited about in a world that seemed to
          have spun completely out of control. I'm quite sure that obsessing
          about the I60 distracted me from obsessing about darker issues that
          were far beyond my influence.

          That for me is the lesson of the Instant Boats and all their
          descendents. Life can slip away as we worry about the things we can't
          control. There are always a thousand reasons why it can't be done; or
          why if it's done THAT WAY, our efforts will be wasted, our dreams
          destroyed.

          Building Bolger's boats has taught me again and again that focusing
          on the things within my means and within my control is far more
          productive, and the rewards are immeasurable.

          YIBB,

          David
          --

          C.E.P.
          415 W.46th Street
          New York, New York 10036
          http://www.crumblingempire.com
          Mobile (646) 325-8325
          Office (212) 247-0296
        • Peter Lenihan
          ... All of it well said David and very true,especially the above paragraph! Although some may well argue otherwise,I believe my own sanity has been
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 3, 2002
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            --- In bolger@y..., David Ryan <david@c...> wrote:
            > Building Bolger's boats has taught me again and again that focusing
            > on the things within my means and within my control is far more
            > productive, and the rewards are immeasurable.
            >
            > YIBB,
            >
            > David
            > --

            All of it well said David and very true,especially the above
            paragraph! Although some may well argue otherwise,I believe my own
            sanity has been saved/maintained through strict adherence to the
            above and the presence/support of my Pesky Crew!
            Happy Dreams!
            Peter Lenihan,up to his ears in schemes for deep winter building
            despite the madness all around me at work...........
          • sanmi
            David, Thanks for bringing me back. Last weekend, I spent hours and hours drawing up some new boom jaws for Alisa. I downloaded a free CAD package (Turbocad
            Message 5 of 5 , Dec 6, 2002
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              David,

              Thanks for bringing me back. Last weekend, I spent hours and hours
              drawing up some new boom jaws for Alisa. I downloaded a free CAD
              package (Turbocad LE) and spent all kinds of time learning how to use
              it just to make a simple 1 page drawing and then I printed it out and
              put it on the kitchen table and kept on admiring it all weekend and
              then afterward I felt guilty because I had spent so much time. But
              it was a good thing to do! I don't feel guilty any more.

              Frank
              Wilmington, DE

              --- In bolger@y..., David Ryan <david@c...> wrote:
              ....I'm quite sure that obsessing
              > about the I60 distracted me from obsessing about darker issues that
              > were far beyond my influence.
              >
              > That for me is the lesson of the Instant Boats and all their
              > descendents. Life can slip away as we worry about the things we
              can't
              > control. There are always a thousand reasons why it can't be done;
              or
              > why if it's done THAT WAY, our efforts will be wasted, our dreams
              > destroyed.
              ....
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