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mystery boat

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  • wturn
    I saw two boats with outboards mounted near the front of the boat in the center of the boat. Would imagine they were in a motor well of some sort. They were
    Message 1 of 11 , Nov 30, 2002
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      I saw two boats with outboards mounted near the front of the boat in
      the center of the boat. Would imagine they were in a motor well of
      some sort. They were built of plywood and appeared to have a large
      live well in the rear of the boat. The bottom was completely flat and
      the bow rose up sharply also with a flat bottom.

      Anyway, posting here to see if anybody knows of a similar design and
      why the outboards were mounted in front.

      Unfortunately it was nighttime and it was on the highway so did not
      get a realy good look. The location was Clearwater, FL.

      Following is a (very) rough sketch:
      http://photos.yahoo.com/bc/wturn/vwp?.dir=/mystery+boat&.src=ph&.dnm=front+outboard+boat.jpg&.view=t&.done=http%3a//photos.yahoo.com/bc/wturn/lst%3f%26.dir=/mystery%2bboat%26.src=ph%26.view=t

      If the link doesnn't work, this would should:
      http://photos.yahoo.com/wturn Navigate to the Mystery boat folder.

      Bill
    • John Bell
      Tractor drive boats (which is what you saw) are often used for inshore commercial fishing, oystering, or crabbing. The engine forward configuration gets the
      Message 2 of 11 , Nov 30, 2002
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        Tractor drive boats (which is what you saw) are often used for inshore
        commercial fishing, oystering, or crabbing. The engine forward configuration
        gets the outboard and propeller out of the working area aft.

        JB

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "wturn" <wturn@...>
        To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, November 30, 2002 10:45 AM
        Subject: [bolger] mystery boat


        | I saw two boats with outboards mounted near the front of the boat in
        | the center of the boat. Would imagine they were in a motor well of
        | some sort. They were built of plywood and appeared to have a large
        | live well in the rear of the boat. The bottom was completely flat and
        | the bow rose up sharply also with a flat bottom.
        |
        | Anyway, posting here to see if anybody knows of a similar design and
        | why the outboards were mounted in front.
        |
        | Unfortunately it was nighttime and it was on the highway so did not
        | get a realy good look. The location was Clearwater, FL.
        |
        | Following is a (very) rough sketch:
        |
        http://photos.yahoo.com/bc/wturn/vwp?.dir=/mystery+boat&.src=ph&.dnm=front+o
        utboard+boat.jpg&.view=t&.done=http%3a//photos.yahoo.com/bc/wturn/lst%3f%26.
        dir=/mystery%2bboat%26.src=ph%26.view=t
        |
        | If the link doesnn't work, this would should:
        | http://photos.yahoo.com/wturn Navigate to the Mystery boat folder.
        |
        | Bill
        |
        |
        | Bolger rules!!!
        | - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
        | - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
        | - add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts and <snip> away
        | - To order plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA,
        01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
        | - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        | - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
        |
        | Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        |
        |
      • Rodger Shull
        wturn, yes ive seen this too,so it was not your imagineation,i 1st saw this on a outdoor program on TV, it appeared the out board was located at half way point
        Message 3 of 11 , Nov 30, 2002
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          wturn, yes ive seen this too,so it was not your imagineation,i 1st saw this on a outdoor program on TV, it appeared the out board was located at half way point on the boats length,an there was a inclosed center console behind it,the boat appered to be 20 to 24 ft in length,, I all so checked this out with so friends from flordia, which is were the program on the TV was from,in the Flordia Keys.. He told me that this was a real deal,not my imagineation.. i to would like to know more on it also, hope this helpped you, have a good day,, Rodger
          wturn <wturn@...> wrote:I saw two boats with outboards mounted near the front of the boat in
          the center of the boat. Would imagine they were in a motor well of
          some sort. They were built of plywood and appeared to have a large
          live well in the rear of the boat. The bottom was completely flat and
          the bow rose up sharply also with a flat bottom.

          Anyway, posting here to see if anybody knows of a similar design and
          why the outboards were mounted in front.

          Unfortunately it was nighttime and it was on the highway so did not
          get a realy good look. The location was Clearwater, FL.

          Following is a (very) rough sketch:
          http://photos.yahoo.com/bc/wturn/vwp?.dir=/mystery+boat&.src=ph&.dnm=front+outboard+boat.jpg&.view=t&.done=http%3a//photos.yahoo.com/bc/wturn/lst%3f%26.dir=/mystery%2bboat%26.src=ph%26.view=t

          If the link doesnn't work, this would should:
          http://photos.yahoo.com/wturn Navigate to the Mystery boat folder.

          Bill


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        • jhkohnen@boat-links.com
          That s not really so odd. Harry V. Sucher gives a few designs for tractor outboard skiffs in Simplified Boatbuilding, and explains the advantages. See one of
          Message 4 of 11 , Nov 30, 2002
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            That's not really so odd. Harry V. Sucher gives a few designs for "tractor"
            outboard skiffs in Simplified Boatbuilding, and explains the advantages.
            See one of the skiffs and the explanation here:

            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MessaboutW/files/BoatPlans/SucherTractor.gif

            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MessaboutW/files/BoatPlans/SucherTractor.txt

            And here's a tractor bait skiff I saw at Winchester Bay a few months ago:

            http://www.boat-links.com/images/BaitSkiff-1.jpg

            http://www.boat-links.com/images/BaitSkiff-2.jpg

            You can see that one of the advantages is that the outboard motor doesn't
            get in the way while handling the net.

            On Sat, 30 Nov 2002 15:45:07 -0000, Bill wrote:
            > I saw two boats with outboards mounted near the front of the boat in
            > the center of the boat. Would imagine they were in a motor well of
            > some sort. They were built of plywood and appeared to have a large
            > live well in the rear of the boat. The bottom was completely flat and
            > the bow rose up sharply also with a flat bottom.
            > ...

            --
            John <jkohnen@...>
            http://www.boat-links.com/
            Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend.
            Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. <Groucho Marx>
          • Richard Barnes
            The commercial net boats at the mouth of Mobile Bay are built this way with a raised seat and control station up front. This lets them see a school of fish
            Message 5 of 11 , Nov 30, 2002
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              The commercial net boats at the mouth of Mobile Bay are built this way with a raised seat and control station up front. This lets them see a school of fish better ( being up high at the front) ; the well mounted engine is to keep the prop , etc. out of the way of the nets being worked. In one of the local seafood places is a photo of one of these boats with 9000 lbs (by their count) of mullet in the boat. Piled up high enough to make me glad I wasn't returning with that load.
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              Bolger rules!!!
              - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
              - stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
              - add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts and <snip> away
              - To order plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
              - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              - Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • wturn
              Thanks for the info and the links. Interesting boat. The BaitSkiff pics look almost identical to what I saw, I would say that they might have been a bit
              Message 6 of 11 , Nov 30, 2002
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                Thanks for the info and the links. Interesting boat. The BaitSkiff
                pics look almost identical to what I saw, I would say that they might
                have been a bit longer.

                Bill

                --- In bolger@y..., jhkohnen@b... wrote:
                > That's not really so odd. Harry V. Sucher gives a few designs for
                "tractor"
                > outboard skiffs in Simplified Boatbuilding, and explains the advantages.
                > See one of the skiffs and the explanation here:
                >
                >
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MessaboutW/files/BoatPlans/SucherTractor.gif
                >
                >
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MessaboutW/files/BoatPlans/SucherTractor.txt
                >
                > And here's a tractor bait skiff I saw at Winchester Bay a few months
                ago:
                >
                > http://www.boat-links.com/images/BaitSkiff-1.jpg
                >
                > http://www.boat-links.com/images/BaitSkiff-2.jpg
                >
                > You can see that one of the advantages is that the outboard motor
                doesn't
                > get in the way while handling the net.
                >
                > On Sat, 30 Nov 2002 15:45:07 -0000, Bill wrote:
                > > I saw two boats with outboards mounted near the front of the boat in
                > > the center of the boat. Would imagine they were in a motor well of
                > > some sort. They were built of plywood and appeared to have a large
                > > live well in the rear of the boat. The bottom was completely flat and
                > > the bow rose up sharply also with a flat bottom.
                > > ...
                >
                > --
                > John <jkohnen@b...>
                > http://www.boat-links.com/
                > Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend.
                > Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. <Groucho Marx>
              • Dean Pacetti
                ... Bill, The boats that you saw are what s called a Net Boat. The well in the back is to hold the gill net and when a school of fish is spotted then the net
                Message 7 of 11 , Dec 1, 2002
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                  --- wturn <wturn@...> wrote:
                  > I saw two boats with outboards mounted near the
                  > front of the boat in
                  > the center of the boat. Would imagine they were in
                  > a motor well of
                  > some sort. They were built of plywood and appeared
                  > to have a large
                  > live well in the rear of the boat. The bottom was
                  > completely flat and
                  > the bow rose up sharply also with a flat bottom.
                  >
                  > Anyway, posting here to see if anybody knows of a
                  > similar design and
                  > why the outboards were mounted in front.
                  > Bill

                  Bill,
                  The boats that you saw are what's called a Net Boat.
                  The well in the back is to hold the gill net and when
                  a school of fish is spotted then the net is run off
                  the back of the boat surrounding and capturing the
                  fish.
                  The engine was mounted in front so it would not get
                  tangled with the net. Also because of the front
                  mounting of the eng. these boats will got through an
                  unbelievable amount of shallow water. The one that I
                  had was 21ft. long with a 50hp. eng. and would run in
                  6 to 8 inches of water.
                  Now adays it is illiegal to use gill nets inshore
                  here in Florida but the boats still make great shallow
                  water fishing boats.
                  Dean
                  Excommerial fisherman and miss it still!!!!!


                  __________________________________________________
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                • gbb132000
                  I ve seen boats like that in Florida. I think they are used for some sort of commercial fishing. Keeps the rear deck clear for work. It may have been what s
                  Message 8 of 11 , Dec 1, 2002
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                    I've seen boats like that in Florida. I think they are used for some
                    sort of commercial fishing. Keeps the rear deck clear for work.

                    It may have been what's called a "tunnel hull". Almost a catamaran
                    type of thing. Good for shallow water and stability, but you would
                    think the boat would handle funny with the moter up forward like that.

                    gbb
                    North GA/USA

                    --- In bolger@y..., "wturn" <wturn@y...> wrote:
                    > I saw two boats with outboards mounted near the front of the boat in
                    > the center of the boat. Would imagine they were in a motor well of
                    > some sort. They were built of plywood and appeared to have a large
                    > live well in the rear of the boat. The bottom was completely flat
                    and
                    > the bow rose up sharply also with a flat bottom.
                    >
                    > Anyway, posting here to see if anybody knows of a similar design and
                    > why the outboards were mounted in front.
                    >
                    > Unfortunately it was nighttime and it was on the highway so did not
                    > get a realy good look. The location was Clearwater, FL.
                    >
                    > Following is a (very) rough sketch:
                    >
                    http://photos.yahoo.com/bc/wturn/vwp?.dir=/mystery+boat&.src=ph&.dnm=f
                    ront+outboard+boat.jpg&.view=t&.done=http%
                    3a//photos.yahoo.com/bc/wturn/lst%3f%26.dir=/mystery%2bboat%26.src=ph%
                    26.view=t
                    >
                    > If the link doesnn't work, this would should:
                    > http://photos.yahoo.com/wturn Navigate to the Mystery boat folder.
                    >
                    > Bill
                  • Paul Lefebvre
                    I saw one of these in action many years ago, I believe it was off Chincoteague island but am not positive now. There were two youngish and very fit guys
                    Message 9 of 11 , Dec 2, 2002
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                      I saw one of these in action many years ago, I believe it was off
                      Chincoteague island but am not positive now. There were two youngish and
                      very fit guys running a long net off the beach in mild surf conditions, and
                      the way they handled that strange boat was so remarkable it made me stop and
                      watch long enough that my girlfriend eventually had to drag me away, even
                      though I was not yet the boat nut I've since become. They'd start with the
                      boat on the beach where they'd just driven it up on the sand; with the motor
                      kicked up and using the boat's rocker, one guy would push at the bow and one
                      at the stern to quickly pivot the boat 180 degrees, then anchor one end of
                      the net on the beach, push the boat off the beach as soon as the next wave
                      floated it, drop the motor and fire it up as soon as they had enough water
                      and blast out through the 2-3' breaking waves to set their net in a big loop
                      just outside the breaker zone and come back in 50-100 yards down the beach,
                      full-speed, and drive it right up the beach at perhaps 20mph or better. I'd
                      never seen an outboard take this kind of abuse except in a James Bond movie,
                      apparently without suffering any damage - it would be at full power until it
                      hit the beach, at which point the driver shut it down at exactly the right
                      moment; the motor would neatly tip up and the boat would slide perhaps 20
                      feet further up on the wet sand before coming to a stop, nearly beyond reach
                      of the waves but not quite - just close enough that waiting thru a few waves
                      would bring them one with enough water to easily relaunch. Then they hauled
                      in their net from the beach, collected their catch, folded their net
                      carefully back in over the stern, spun the boat on the sand and repeated the
                      whole operation again, all very swiftly coordenated movements with barely a
                      word spoken. Very impressive performance, those two guys never stopped
                      moving, and I'd never seen such precise boat handling on both land and
                      water.

                      Paul L.

                      Subject: Re: [bolger] mystery boat
                    • Harry James
                      I have seen the running up the beach technique before. I lived in the village of Elim (pop 300) in Western AK for three years. It is a coastal village on the
                      Message 10 of 11 , Dec 2, 2002
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                        I have seen the running up the beach technique before. I lived in the
                        village of Elim (pop 300) in Western AK for three years. It is a coastal
                        village on the North side of Norton Sound on Seward Peninsula, 80NM East
                        of Nome. They keep the boats anchored off the village which has a sandy
                        beach. When a storm was coming in the fall, each boat owner would fire
                        up his boat and head full bore for the beach, cutting the motor just as
                        it touched, it would kick up and the boat would slide 2-3 boat lengths
                        up the steep beach. Every body working together would go from boat to
                        boat and haul it the rest ofthe way up to high ground. They called it
                        "flying the boat" up the beach.

                        HJ

                        Paul Lefebvre wrote:

                        >I saw one of these in action many years ago, I believe it was off
                        >Chincoteague island but am not positive now. There were two youngish and
                        >very fit guys running a long net off the beach in mild surf conditions, and
                        >the way they handled that strange boat was so remarkable it made me stop and
                        >watch long enough that my girlfriend eventually had to drag me away, even
                        >though I was not yet the boat nut I've since become. They'd start with the
                        >boat on the beach where they'd just driven it up on the sand; with the motor
                        >kicked up and using the boat's rocker, one guy would push at the bow and one
                        >at the stern to quickly pivot the boat 180 degrees, then anchor one end of
                        >the net on the beach, push the boat off the beach as soon as the next wave
                        >floated it, drop the motor and fire it up as soon as they had enough water
                        >and blast out through the 2-3' breaking waves to set their net in a big loop
                        >just outside the breaker zone and come back in 50-100 yards down the beach,
                        >full-speed, and drive it right up the beach at perhaps 20mph or better. I'd
                        >never seen an outboard take this kind of abuse except in a James Bond movie,
                        >apparently without suffering any damage - it would be at full power until it
                        >hit the beach, at which point the driver shut it down at exactly the right
                        >moment; the motor would neatly tip up and the boat would slide perhaps 20
                        >feet further up on the wet sand before coming to a stop, nearly beyond reach
                        >of the waves but not quite - just close enough that waiting thru a few waves
                        >would bring them one with enough water to easily relaunch. Then they hauled
                        >in their net from the beach, collected their catch, folded their net
                        >carefully back in over the stern, spun the boat on the sand and repeated the
                        >whole operation again, all very swiftly coordenated movements with barely a
                        >word spoken. Very impressive performance, those two guys never stopped
                        >moving, and I'd never seen such precise boat handling on both land and
                        >water.
                        >
                        >Paul L.
                        >
                        >Subject: Re: [bolger] mystery boat
                        >
                      • jhkohnen@boat-links.com
                        The dories (they re just big skiffs these days) that launch off the beach at Pacific City, Oregon beach at high speed also. They come flying in and slide up
                        Message 11 of 11 , Dec 4, 2002
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                          The "dories" (they're just big skiffs these days) that launch off the beach
                          at Pacific City, Oregon beach at high speed also. They come flying in and
                          slide up the beach, usually high enough that no further effort is required
                          before the trailer is driven up in front of the boat and it's winched
                          aboard.

                          http://home.att.net/~td2evers/

                          http://home.att.net/~td2evers/doryphotos7.htm

                          http://education.opb.org/learning/ofg/dory/theindex.html

                          On Mon, 02 Dec 2002 12:42:56 -0900, HJ wrote:
                          > I have seen the running up the beach technique before. I lived in the
                          > village of Elim (pop 300) in Western AK for three years. It is a coastal
                          > village on the North side of Norton Sound on Seward Peninsula, 80NM East
                          > of Nome. They keep the boats anchored off the village which has a sandy
                          > beach. When a storm was coming in the fall, each boat owner would fire
                          > up his boat and head full bore for the beach, cutting the motor just as
                          > it touched, it would kick up and the boat would slide 2-3 boat lengths
                          > up the steep beach. Every body working together would go from boat to
                          > boat and haul it the rest ofthe way up to high ground. They called it
                          > "flying the boat" up the beach.

                          --
                          John <jkohnen@...>
                          http://www.boat-links.com/
                          I cannot help thinking that the people with motor boats miss a great deal.
                          If they would only keep to rowboats or canoes, and use oar or paddle...
                          they would get infinitely more benefit than by having their work done for
                          them by gasoline. <Theodore Roosevelt>
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