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Re: Sweat Pea is Floatation needed???

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  • jbatesblnk
    ... Bruce, Yes, this is a fun design to hold in your mind s eye. I agree that the sealed wrap-around deck would offer some protection from swamping in a
    Message 1 of 14 , Oct 28, 2002
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      --- In bolger@y..., "brucehallman" <brucehallman@y...> wrote:
      > --- John "jbatesblnk" wrote RE: Cartopper
      >
      > > If you do want something more
      > > seaworthy without getting too large,
      > > the Sweet Pea design might be a
      > > good option. It does include a large
      > > amount of floatation in the design.
      >
      > I have spent more than a small
      > amount of time 'building' Sweat
      > Pea in my mind's eye. As near as
      > I can decipher, the floatation of
      > Sweat Pea is achieved, not from
      > foam or air chambers, but from the
      > raised full length decks along
      > each side of the boat. If the
      > boat lies over on her side, the
      > decks provide floatation.
      >
      > + Both the forward and after bulkheads
      > would trap air for some floatation, but
      > they have holes to pass a spare set of
      > oars, plus the bulkheads have 'limbers'.
      >
      > I wonder if one was to take on massive
      > water from a breaking surf, whether
      > and how Sweat Pea would handle it?
      >
      > I guess I will have to build one
      > to test it out. <grin>

      Bruce,

      Yes, this is a fun design to hold in your mind's eye. I agree that
      the sealed wrap-around deck would offer some protection from swamping
      in a knockdown. However, what I was refering to was Dynamite Payson's
      Woodenboat article building it. He stuffed the bow and stern with
      foam and added a layer cut to fit under the deck. His point, sailing
      as he does in midcoast Maine, was that he wanted to be as far as
      possible out of the water in the event of a swamping. But I don't
      think he ever tested it...

      I've always loved the Sweet Pea design and recently bought the plans
      from Dynamite. The shape is just what I want, but a with a few
      modifications to fit my needs. The most important is scaling it up
      20% to 18 ft overall. I'm messing with an autocad system at work, but
      may soon have to retreat to the manual methods Sam Devlin published.
      The other major change would be exchanging the slipping keel for a
      centerboard. Not quite sure what I'll do with the rig, but will try
      to keep everything simple as the boat will be used by a variety of
      family members.

      Fun stuff. Have a couple of boats to build before I get to this one,
      so plenty of time to consider.

      Hunkering down for winter on the Hudson,
      John
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