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Light Dory Type V

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  • Lincoln Ross
    Thinking about that hazy future when I have a job and money to buy wood. Anyone on this list ever build the Type V? What s it like? Compared to Gloucester
    Message 1 of 25 , Sep 18, 2002
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      Thinking about that hazy future when I have a job and money to buy
      wood. Anyone on this list ever build the Type V? What's it like?
      Compared to Gloucester Gull? Do the plans include panel expansions?
      Remember, this is hazy future stuff, and I could get interested in
      something else, so don't go to any trouble as it's mostly an
      entertainment topic.
    • jhkohnen@boat-links.com
      Here are a couple of photos of a Type V, the only one I ve seen in the flesh: http://www.boat-links.com/messabout/02/Messabout-2.html I didn t try it out
      Message 2 of 25 , Sep 18, 2002
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        Here are a couple of photos of a Type V, the only one I've seen in the
        flesh:

        http://www.boat-links.com/messabout/02/Messabout-2.html

        I didn't try it out myself, but it seemed to go well, and I like the look of
        it (though I think the reason the design wasn't a success is that people
        like a dory to have a tombstone...). The plans in Small Boats don't give
        panel expansions, since the boat is supposed to be built on a strongback.

        On Wed, 18 Sep 2002 14:13:01 -0000, Lincoln Ross wrote:
        > Thinking about that hazy future when I have a job and money to buy
        > wood. Anyone on this list ever build the Type V? What's it like?
        > Compared to Gloucester Gull? Do the plans include panel expansions?
        > Remember, this is hazy future stuff, and I could get interested in
        > something else, so don't go to any trouble as it's mostly an
        > entertainment topic.

        --
        John <jkohnen@...>
        http://www.boat-links.com/
        Heaven, as conventionally conceived, is a place so inane, so dull,
        so useless, so miserable, that nobody has ever ventured to describe
        a whole day in heaven, though plenty of people have described
        a day at the seashore. <G. B. Shaw>
      • Lincoln Ross
        Thanks. Nice picture. Is that a monkey in the stern? I have the Small Boats plans too, but I thought there might be more. Gloucester Gull is meant for
        Message 3 of 25 , Sep 19, 2002
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          Thanks. Nice picture. Is that a monkey in the stern? I have the Small
          Boats plans too, but I thought there might be more. Gloucester Gull is
          meant for strongbacks too, but the side panel expansions are given
          anyway in "Go Build Your Own Boat". Seems like even when using
          strongback having the expansions might be less work spiling, or
          whatever you call it, plus maybe implying that sufficient attention
          has been paid to the lines and dimensions to avoid the necessity of
          lofting as a double check. To me, having a transom is a negative
          point. If you leave it out you don't have to make one. What is the
          purpose of dory transoms anyway? Shorter boat? Sculling oar?

          Still waffling in imaginary future between Type 5 and Crystal. Also
          wondering if someone in Boston area wants something small built.
          --- In bolger@y..., jhkohnen@b... wrote:
          > Here are a couple of photos of a Type V, the only one I've seen in
          the
          > flesh:
          >
          > http://www.boat-links.com/messabout/02/Messabout-2.html
          >
          > I didn't try it out myself, but it seemed to go well, and I like the
          look of
          > it (though I think the reason the design wasn't a success is that
          people
          > like a dory to have a tombstone...). The plans in Small Boats don't
          give
          > panel expansions, since the boat is supposed to be built on a
          strongback.
          >
          > On Wed, 18 Sep 2002 14:13:01 -0000, Lincoln Ross wrote:
          > > Thinking about that hazy future when I have a job and money to buy
          > > wood. Anyone on this list ever build the Type V? What's it like?
          > > Compared to Gloucester Gull? Do the plans include panel
          expansions?
          > > Remember, this is hazy future stuff, and I could get interested in
          > > something else, so don't go to any trouble as it's mostly an
          > > entertainment topic.
          >
          > --
          > John <jkohnen@b...>
          > http://www.boat-links.com/
          > Heaven, as conventionally conceived, is a place so inane, so
          dull,
          > so useless, so miserable, that nobody has ever ventured to
          describe
          > a whole day in heaven, though plenty of people have
          described
          > a day at the seashore. <G. B. Shaw>
        • brucehallman
          ... Another closely similar boat to these two is Sweet Pea. She has the double ended dory shape of the Type 5 and the surf capable floatation of Crystal.
          Message 4 of 25 , Sep 19, 2002
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            > Still waffling in imaginary future
            > between Type 5 and Crystal.

            Another closely similar boat to
            these two is Sweet Pea. She has
            the 'double ended dory' shape of
            the Type 5 and the 'surf capable
            floatation' of Crystal.

            ...
            "But wait, there's more!
            It's not sold in any store!"
            <Ron Popeil'ish grin>
            ...

            Unlike the other two, she also has
            sail rig/rudder/keel which are
            removable! This allows her to be
            sailed without spoiling her rowing
            ability. Not to mention, I believe,
            that plans are available from
            Payson, [meaning they are cheaper] and
            the plans have developed panels
            dimensions too.
          • David Ryan
            ... Flotation is *vastly* overrated. -- C.E.P. 415 W.46th Street New York, New York 10036 http://www.crumblingempire.com Mobile (646) 325-8325 Office (212)
            Message 5 of 25 , Sep 19, 2002
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              >> Still waffling in imaginary future
              >> between Type 5 and Crystal.
              >
              >Another closely similar boat to
              >these two is Sweet Pea. She has
              >the 'double ended dory' shape of
              >the Type 5 and the 'surf capable
              >floatation' of Crystal.

              Flotation is *vastly* overrated.


              --

              C.E.P.
              415 W.46th Street
              New York, New York 10036
              http://www.crumblingempire.com
              Mobile (646) 325-8325
              Office (212) 247-0296
            • Lincoln Ross
              Bolger says Sweet Pea will stamp and stop in steep waves. I could just stay with my existing boat which also has this flaw, as well as the virtue of staying
              Message 6 of 25 , Sep 19, 2002
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                Bolger says Sweet Pea will "stamp and stop" in steep waves. I could
                just stay with my existing boat which also has this flaw, as well as
                the virtue of staying quite dry. Too bad, as Sweet Pea is also meant
                to sail and I bet with a daggerboard or something would even go
                upwind well. It has been on my possibilities list at one time or
                another, until I got mostly stopped by waves in my existing boat
                recently.

                As far as flotation, when I had capsized my O'Day Sprite in very cold
                water and didn't know someone was coming out to give me a tow, I would
                have given a lot for a little more flotation!

                As drawn, I think a lot of that underdeck space on Sweet Pea is not
                sealed off, though it shouldn't be hard to do. The lines are pretty
                different from the Type 5, though they certainly look similar in the
                water.

                With any of these I would have to pay close attention to weight as I
                am trailer resistant. If I accepted trailers, the next stop might be
                the Folding Schooner!

                --- In bolger@y..., David Ryan <david@c...> wrote:
                > >> Still waffling in imaginary future
                > >> between Type 5 and Crystal.
                > >
                > >Another closely similar boat to
                > >these two is Sweet Pea. She has
                > >the 'double ended dory' shape of
                > >the Type 5 and the 'surf capable
                > >floatation' of Crystal.
                >
                > Flotation is *vastly* overrated.
                >
                >
                > --
                >
                > C.E.P.
                > 415 W.46th Street
                > New York, New York 10036
                > http://www.crumblingempire.com
                > Mobile (646) 325-8325
                > Office (212) 247-0296
              • brucehallman
                ... PCB: [Crystal] outdoes most ...going softly into a head sea and running straight, with little effort, in a following one. She s rather tender on account
                Message 7 of 25 , Sep 19, 2002
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                  --- In bolger@y..., "Lincoln Ross" <lincolnr@r...> wrote:
                  > Bolger says Sweet Pea will
                  > "stamp and stop" in steep waves.

                  PCB: "[Crystal] outdoes most
                  ...going softly into a head
                  sea and running straight,
                  with little effort, in a
                  following one. She's rather
                  tender on account of sharp
                  deadrise (but not nearly as
                  bad as a dory of her weight]"


                  I, too, am dreaming of the
                  'next boat'. Which, I could
                  launch into the surf from the
                  beach near where I live, and
                  Crystal might be the best choice.

                  I imagine that the watertight
                  volume might be much appreciated
                  should I swamp in the [cold] surf.

                  More-so, I take the fact that
                  Crystal is one of the boats
                  which PCB chose to personally
                  own to be high praise.

                  Looking at the two bows of
                  Sweet Pea and Crystal side-by
                  side, indeed Crystal has more
                  fine entry lines, but not by
                  that much IMO.

                  http://www.hallman.org/bolger/Crystal/two_bows.gif
                • Bruce Hallman
                  It appears to me that Light Dory Type V is superior to the Gloucester Gull in every way but the colorful sounding name. I image her as an ideal boat to launch
                  Message 8 of 25 , Jan 31, 2007
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                    It appears to me that Light Dory Type V is superior to the Gloucester
                    Gull in every way but the colorful sounding name. I image her as an
                    ideal boat to launch through the surf near my home to salmon fish.
                    Plus, in typical Bolger style, it looks to me that she can be squeezed
                    from only three sheets of 1/4" ply, (plus a few ply scraps from the
                    scrap pile for seats).

                    http://hallman.org/bolger/LightDoryV/LightDoryV.png
                    http://hallman.org/bolger/LightDoryV/LightDoryV.fbm

                    The fbm is made using Imperial units, versus the original metric, as I
                    prefer using inches.
                  • HUW EVANS
                    Hi Bruce I am able to open your png file but for some reason I ca nt open the fbm , any ideas ? Are the dimension similar to the G Gull ? All this info is much
                    Message 9 of 25 , Jan 31, 2007
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                      Hi Bruce
                      I am able to open your png file
                      but for some reason I ca'nt open the fbm , any ideas ?
                      Are the dimension similar to the G Gull ?
                      All this info is much appreciated
                      Huw
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: Bruce Hallman
                      To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2007 6:36 PM
                      Subject: [bolger] Light Dory Type V


                      It appears to me that Light Dory Type V is superior to the Gloucester
                      Gull in every way but the colorful sounding name. I image her as an
                      ideal boat to launch through the surf near my home to salmon fish.
                      Plus, in typical Bolger style, it looks to me that she can be squeezed
                      from only three sheets of 1/4" ply, (plus a few ply scraps from the
                      scrap pile for seats).

                      http://hallman.org/bolger/LightDoryV/LightDoryV.png
                      http://hallman.org/bolger/LightDoryV/LightDoryV.fbm

                      The fbm is made using Imperial units, versus the original metric, as I
                      prefer using inches.




                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Bruce Hallman
                      ... The fbm file link just opened fine for me. It requires the Windows program Freeship 2.6 with which to open it. If you set your folder options to
                      Message 10 of 25 , Jan 31, 2007
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                        > but for some reason I ca'nt open the fbm , any ideas ?

                        The fbm file link just opened fine for me. It requires the Windows
                        program Freeship 2.6 with which to open it. If you set your 'folder
                        options' to associate the 'fbm' file extensions with the Freeship.exe
                        program, the links open directly in the program, otherwise you must
                        save the file to your hard drive first.

                        The program is here, (and elsewhere on the Internet too).

                        http://hallman.org/fs/2.6/FREEship_version_2.6_win32_executable(2).zip

                        > Are the dimension similar to the G Gull ?

                        Very similar to the Gull, but a little lower and wider.
                      • joe_mapango
                        Hello bruce. First let me say Thank You for all the times you post FS an PNG pictures of boats. I m not a Bolger fanatic (Not that you ARE ;-)), but I
                        Message 11 of 25 , Jan 31, 2007
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                          Hello bruce. First let me say "Thank You" for all the times you post
                          FS an PNG pictures of boats. I'm not a Bolger fanatic (Not that you
                          ARE ;-)), but I always enjoy looking at your boat pictures.

                          I don't know if your the appointed FS guy, but it's a great service
                          your provide to everyone on this list.

                          I have never used FS, but I have used Hulls. One thing I never
                          figured out was how one could use output from Hulls (or FS) to
                          generate enough information to actually build a boat. This may be a
                          completely stupid question, but how can one do it.

                          For example, I've seen Hull's and FS files for the Paradox. Matt has
                          yet to release the plans for the Enigma, but it's really just (mostly)
                          a smaller paradox. One can (I'm sure) open up the Paradox file and
                          "shrink" the boat, but then how would one A. Print full size
                          templates out (assuming a big plotter is available), or B Print out a
                          scale to cut the plywood forms by.

                          I'm not asking for a step by step tutorial, just a nudge in the right
                          direction.

                          P.S. I run Hulls under my Apple iBook G4 under Virtual PC and
                          Windows98.

                          Chris Curtis




                          --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce Hallman" <bruce@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > > but for some reason I ca'nt open the fbm , any ideas ?
                          >
                          > The fbm file link just opened fine for me. It requires the Windows
                          > program Freeship 2.6 with which to open it. If you set your 'folder
                          > options' to associate the 'fbm' file extensions with the Freeship.exe
                          > program, the links open directly in the program, otherwise you must
                          > save the file to your hard drive first.
                          >
                          > The program is here, (and elsewhere on the Internet too).
                          >
                          > http://hallman.org/fs/2.6/FREEship_version_2.6_win32_executable(2).zip
                          >
                          > > Are the dimension similar to the G Gull ?
                          >
                          > Very similar to the Gull, but a little lower and wider.
                          >
                        • Sam Glasscock
                          Bruce, I think you are right. I built the stretched light dory, which is a longer stitch-and-glue version of the Gull. Beautiful boat, but the hardest part
                          Message 12 of 25 , Jan 31, 2007
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                            Bruce, I think you are right. I built the
                            stretched light dory, which is a longer
                            stitch-and-glue version of the Gull. Beautiful boat,
                            but the hardest part of building it was the tombstone
                            transom eliminated in the Type Five. The tombstone is
                            pretty, but useless--a vestigial remnant of the old
                            dories which could be sculled via the notch in the
                            transom. Anyone who can stand in an empty gull and
                            scull it is a better man than I. Making the boat a
                            double-ender makes it lighter and easier to build
                            without loss of function, except a very small loss of
                            bouyancy in the stern.
                            --- Bruce Hallman <bruce@...> wrote:

                            > It appears to me that Light Dory Type V is superior
                            > to the Gloucester
                            > Gull in every way but the colorful sounding name. I
                            > image her as an
                            > ideal boat to launch through the surf near my home
                            > to salmon fish.
                            > Plus, in typical Bolger style, it looks to me that
                            > she can be squeezed
                            > from only three sheets of 1/4" ply, (plus a few ply
                            > scraps from the
                            > scrap pile for seats).
                            >
                            > http://hallman.org/bolger/LightDoryV/LightDoryV.png
                            > http://hallman.org/bolger/LightDoryV/LightDoryV.fbm
                            >
                            > The fbm is made using Imperial units, versus the
                            > original metric, as I
                            > prefer using inches.
                            >




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                          • Wesley Cox
                            I agree and I personally much prefer the aesthetics of a double ended boat. The very small difference in bouyancy in the stern might be signicant in terms of
                            Message 13 of 25 , Jan 31, 2007
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                              I agree and I personally much prefer the aesthetics of a double ended boat. The very small difference in bouyancy in the stern might be signicant in terms of riding up and over a following sea. What I think is a more important difference than this, though, is when loading and unloading from a vehicle. Having a fair bit of experience single handed unloading a 90 lb. canoe from the rack on my truck, about 7 ft. high, I've often thought it would be much less tippy during the transition if it had even a small transom, flat on top rather than the rounded top tombstone shape. The canoe I now have weighs more like 75 lb. and it's no problem to rest one point on the ground, support the other end about 1/3 back from the stem on the rack and lift both ends straight up from there. This wasn't always practical with the 90 lb. one depending on wind strength and my level of fatigue. Much heavier and the transom would be a definite plus for this purpose.

                              Some would say there's a weight limit when car topping, period, and I used to agree but now I'm thinking about a mid-size human or sail powered boat to be either car topped or launched from a trailer for Lake Michigan. It's a choice between trailer launching then going through the mouth of the marina where the chop is always huge compared to the surrounding water and there are frequently big fishing boats, not always piloted in a safe manner or launching from the serene beach a mere 100 yards from the nearest parking, no launch fee, no trailer hassles. Personally, I'm leaning toward a cart with 2 wheel barrow size pneumatic wheels (to not sink in the sand, hopefully) which attaches to the gunnels while the boat is still on the rack and a process I envision that would never require lifting more than half the weight of the boat. A small flat top transom isn't entirely off the table for me, though.

                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: Sam Glasscock
                              To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2007 5:16 PM
                              Subject: Re: [bolger] Light Dory Type V


                              Bruce, I think you are right. I built the
                              stretched light dory, which is a longer
                              stitch-and-glue version of the Gull. Beautiful boat,
                              but the hardest part of building it was the tombstone
                              transom eliminated in the Type Five. The tombstone is
                              pretty, but useless--a vestigial remnant of the old
                              dories which could be sculled via the notch in the
                              transom. Anyone who can stand in an empty gull and
                              scull it is a better man than I. Making the boat a
                              double-ender makes it lighter and easier to build
                              without loss of function, except a very small loss of
                              bouyancy in the stern.
                              --- Bruce Hallman <bruce@...> wrote:

                              > It appears to me that Light Dory Type V is superior
                              > to the Gloucester
                              > Gull in every way but the colorful sounding name. I
                              > image her as an
                              > ideal boat to launch through the surf near my home
                              > to salmon fish.
                              > Plus, in typical Bolger style, it looks to me that
                              > she can be squeezed
                              > from only three sheets of 1/4" ply, (plus a few ply
                              > scraps from the
                              > scrap pile for seats).
                              >
                              > http://hallman.org/bolger/LightDoryV/LightDoryV.png
                              > http://hallman.org/bolger/LightDoryV/LightDoryV.fbm
                              >
                              > The fbm is made using Imperial units, versus the
                              > original metric, as I
                              > prefer using inches.
                              >

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                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Bruce Hallman
                              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Freeship_HTandT_Group/ has a lot of support for Freeship [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              Message 14 of 25 , Jan 31, 2007
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                                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Freeship_HTandT_Group/

                                has a lot of support for Freeship


                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Matthew Lawson
                                ... boat. The very small difference in bouyancy in the stern might be signicant in terms of riding up and over a following sea. What I think is a more
                                Message 15 of 25 , Jan 31, 2007
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                                  --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Wesley Cox" <inspirfe@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > I agree and I personally much prefer the aesthetics of a double ended
                                  boat. The very small difference in bouyancy in the stern might be
                                  signicant in terms of riding up and over a following sea. What I think
                                  is a more important difference than this, though, is when loading and
                                  unloading from a vehicle.....

                                  Wes:

                                  On cartopping a relatively heavy double ender, I do that with my
                                  Windsprint on an SUV. I have a roof-rack extender on the front rack.
                                  Then on the boat, I have a removable wheel that I lash into the bow
                                  (which points to the rear of the car). To load, I walk the stern of
                                  the overturned boat to the car (bow follows on wheel) and rest it on
                                  the extended front bar. Then I hold the gunwale, walk (back) to the
                                  bow, lift the bow to the center of the back rack, then center the stern
                                  on the front rack while I slide in the extender bar, then lash it all
                                  down.

                                  One day I'll take pics. Not now, with snow on the ground.

                                  Matt Lawson
                                  Trenton, NJ
                                • Wesley Cox
                                  That sounds much like what I have in mind. Glad to hear it works for someone. ... From: Matthew Lawson To: bolger@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wednesday, January 31,
                                  Message 16 of 25 , Jan 31, 2007
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                                    That sounds much like what I have in mind. Glad to hear it works for someone.

                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    From: Matthew Lawson
                                    To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2007 10:00 PM
                                    Subject: [bolger] Re: Light Dory Type V


                                    --- In bolger@yahoogroups.com, "Wesley Cox" <inspirfe@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > I agree and I personally much prefer the aesthetics of a double ended
                                    boat. The very small difference in bouyancy in the stern might be
                                    signicant in terms of riding up and over a following sea. What I think
                                    is a more important difference than this, though, is when loading and
                                    unloading from a vehicle.....

                                    Wes:

                                    On cartopping a relatively heavy double ender, I do that with my
                                    Windsprint on an SUV. I have a roof-rack extender on the front rack.
                                    Then on the boat, I have a removable wheel that I lash into the bow
                                    (which points to the rear of the car). To load, I walk the stern of
                                    the overturned boat to the car (bow follows on wheel) and rest it on
                                    the extended front bar. Then I hold the gunwale, walk (back) to the
                                    bow, lift the bow to the center of the back rack, then center the stern
                                    on the front rack while I slide in the extender bar, then lash it all
                                    down.

                                    One day I'll take pics. Not now, with snow on the ground.

                                    Matt Lawson
                                    Trenton, NJ





                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • adventures_in_astrophotography
                                    Hi Sam, ... I ll second that! I left the sculling notch out of my Long Light Dory tombstone, simply because it was hard to cut out, but I can t imagine
                                    Message 17 of 25 , Feb 1, 2007
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                                      Hi Sam,

                                      ... snip...
                                      > Anyone who can stand in an empty gull and
                                      > scull it is a better man than I.

                                      I'll second that! I left the sculling notch out of my Long Light Dory
                                      tombstone, simply because it was hard to cut out, but I can't imagine
                                      standing up for long in that boat in anything but flat water. It's
                                      possible that the sculling oar would provide some balance, but I'm
                                      happy to keep my butt on the seat and row.

                                      Jon Kolb
                                      www.kolbsadventures.com/boatbuilding_index.htm
                                    • adventures_in_astrophotography
                                      Hi Wesley, ...snip... Personally, I m leaning toward a cart with 2 wheel barrow size pneumatic wheels (to not sink in the sand, hopefully) which attaches to
                                      Message 18 of 25 , Feb 1, 2007
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                                        Hi Wesley,

                                        ...snip...
                                        Personally, I'm leaning toward a cart with 2 wheel barrow size
                                        pneumatic wheels (to not sink in the sand, hopefully) which attaches
                                        to the gunnels while the boat is still on the rack and a process I
                                        envision that would never require lifting more than half the weight
                                        of the boat.
                                        ...snip...

                                        I built a hand cart that looks like a small wooden trailer for my
                                        Long Light Dory. It's a bit heavy, since it has a 4x4 backbone, but
                                        it beats trailer launching for this sort of "in between" size boat.
                                        I carry the boat and cart to the lake on 2x6 crosswise bunks bolted
                                        to the deck of a 16' utility trailer, then roll the boat off using
                                        cheap ramps and right into the water. This also allows me to launch
                                        off the small beach area away from the impatient crowd in their huge
                                        plastic noisemakers. If you have other use for a utility trailer
                                        (and who doesn't) and a place to park it, I recommend looking into
                                        this approach. Besides, you can carry different boats you might
                                        build later with the same trailer.

                                        Jon Kolb
                                        www.kolbsadventures.com/boatbuilding_index.htm
                                      • Sam Glasscock
                                        Yeah, but aren t they a sweet boat to row, and to look at? I always used to say mine was the prettiest boat in the county, and she still would be, if I hadn t
                                        Message 19 of 25 , Feb 1, 2007
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                                          Yeah, but aren't they a sweet boat to row, and to look
                                          at? I always used to say mine was the prettiest boat
                                          in the county, and she still would be, if I hadn't
                                          built her out of luan.
                                          --- adventures_in_astrophotography
                                          <jon@...> wrote:

                                          > Hi Sam,
                                          >
                                          > ... snip...
                                          > > Anyone who can stand in an empty gull and
                                          > > scull it is a better man than I.
                                          >
                                          > I'll second that! I left the sculling notch out of
                                          > my Long Light Dory
                                          > tombstone, simply because it was hard to cut out,
                                          > but I can't imagine
                                          > standing up for long in that boat in anything but
                                          > flat water. It's
                                          > possible that the sculling oar would provide some
                                          > balance, but I'm
                                          > happy to keep my butt on the seat and row.
                                          >
                                          > Jon Kolb
                                          > www.kolbsadventures.com/boatbuilding_index.htm
                                          >
                                          >




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                                        • Bruce Hallman
                                          ... Compare the Light Dory(s) with June Bug, which is the same size and weight, but in June Bug you can stand on a gunnel without shipping water.
                                          Message 20 of 25 , Feb 1, 2007
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                                            > > Anyone who can stand in an empty gull and
                                            > > scull it is a better man than I.
                                            >
                                            > I'll second that!

                                            Compare the Light Dory(s) with June Bug, which is the same size and
                                            weight, but in June Bug you can stand on a gunnel without shipping
                                            water.
                                          • adventures_in_astrophotography
                                            Hi Sam, ... Amen. Mine s the prettiest boat at the lake whenever she s there. A joy to row, and even better with two of us. Jon Kolb
                                            Message 21 of 25 , Feb 1, 2007
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                                              Hi Sam,

                                              > Yeah, but aren't they a sweet boat to row, and to look
                                              > at? I always used to say mine was the prettiest boat
                                              > in the county, and she still would be, if I hadn't
                                              > built her out of luan.

                                              Amen. Mine's the prettiest boat at the lake whenever she's there. A
                                              joy to row, and even better with two of us.

                                              Jon Kolb
                                              www.kolbsadventures.com/boatbuilding_index.htm
                                            • Bruce Hallman
                                              ... Certainly all true, (and this is now splitting hairs), but I think I notice that during Phil Bolger s career that he has tended towards giving increased
                                              Message 22 of 25 , Feb 1, 2007
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                                                > Amen. Mine's the prettiest boat at the lake whenever she's there. A
                                                > joy to row, and even better with two of us.

                                                Certainly all true, (and this is now splitting hairs), but I think I
                                                notice that during Phil Bolger's career that he has tended towards
                                                giving increased buoyancy in the bow and stern of rowboats. I think
                                                his hypothesis is that there is trade off of 'fine entry lines' versus
                                                a gain from 'effective waterline length' which is slightly more
                                                desireable in rowboats. I bet that the 'perfect' rowboat in PCB's
                                                mind might have more fullness in the ends than a Light Dory V.

                                                Though, I cannot argue that those long sweeping lines are gorgeous,
                                                and might be spoiled if made more full in the ends.
                                              • Wesley Cox
                                                Good idea. I actually have a boat trailer with no boat on it that I could modify, and would have to modify for any curvy hull I would build next. I had
                                                Message 23 of 25 , Feb 1, 2007
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                                                  Good idea. I actually have a boat trailer with no boat on it that I could modify, and would have to modify for any curvy hull I would build next. I had considered detaching the trailer from the hitch and pulling it with boat across the beach but the necessary tongue weight for driving would require a tongue extension to make it reasonable for hand carting, resulting in a big long heavy thing to maneuver across the sand. Thanks for the idea.


                                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                                  From: adventures_in_astrophotography
                                                  To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                                  Sent: Thursday, February 01, 2007 8:14 AM
                                                  Subject: [bolger] Re: Light Dory Type V


                                                  Hi Wesley,

                                                  ...snip...
                                                  Personally, I'm leaning toward a cart with 2 wheel barrow size
                                                  pneumatic wheels (to not sink in the sand, hopefully) which attaches
                                                  to the gunnels while the boat is still on the rack and a process I
                                                  envision that would never require lifting more than half the weight
                                                  of the boat.
                                                  ...snip...

                                                  I built a hand cart that looks like a small wooden trailer for my
                                                  Long Light Dory. It's a bit heavy, since it has a 4x4 backbone, but
                                                  it beats trailer launching for this sort of "in between" size boat.
                                                  I carry the boat and cart to the lake on 2x6 crosswise bunks bolted
                                                  to the deck of a 16' utility trailer, then roll the boat off using
                                                  cheap ramps and right into the water. This also allows me to launch
                                                  off the small beach area away from the impatient crowd in their huge
                                                  plastic noisemakers. If you have other use for a utility trailer
                                                  (and who doesn't) and a place to park it, I recommend looking into
                                                  this approach. Besides, you can carry different boats you might
                                                  build later with the same trailer.

                                                  Jon Kolb
                                                  www.kolbsadventures.com/boatbuilding_index.htm





                                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                • dave seeton
                                                  For what its worth I built a 16 wooden trailer with two fixed wheel barrow tires to transport 16 wooden boat to launch site. In SC you don t have to lic. a
                                                  Message 24 of 25 , Feb 1, 2007
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                                                    For what its worth I built a 16' wooden trailer with two fixed wheel barrow tires to transport 16' wooden boat to launch site. In SC you don't have to lic. a trailer. And of course the launch site is only 2 1/2 miles from the house.
                                                    Dave

                                                    adventures_in_astrophotography <jon@...> wrote:
                                                    Hi Wesley,

                                                    ...snip...
                                                    Personally, I'm leaning toward a cart with 2 wheel barrow size
                                                    pneumatic wheels (to not sink in the sand, hopefully) which attaches
                                                    to the gunnels while the boat is still on the rack and a process I
                                                    envision that would never require lifting more than half the weight
                                                    of the boat.
                                                    ...snip...

                                                    I built a hand cart that looks like a small wooden trailer for my
                                                    Long Light Dory. It's a bit heavy, since it has a 4x4 backbone, but
                                                    it beats trailer launching for this sort of "in between" size boat.
                                                    I carry the boat and cart to the lake on 2x6 crosswise bunks bolted
                                                    to the deck of a 16' utility trailer, then roll the boat off using
                                                    cheap ramps and right into the water. This also allows me to launch
                                                    off the small beach area away from the impatient crowd in their huge
                                                    plastic noisemakers. If you have other use for a utility trailer
                                                    (and who doesn't) and a place to park it, I recommend looking into
                                                    this approach. Besides, you can carry different boats you might
                                                    build later with the same trailer.

                                                    Jon Kolb
                                                    www.kolbsadventures.com/boatbuilding_index.htm






                                                    ---------------------------------
                                                    Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail beta.

                                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                  • John and Kathy Trussell
                                                    I used to think that the variations of the Light Dory were the prettiest boats that could be made from 4 sheets of plywood. At the risk of blasphemy, I think
                                                    Message 25 of 25 , Feb 1, 2007
                                                    • 0 Attachment
                                                      I used to think that the variations of the Light Dory were the prettiest boats that could be made from 4 sheets of plywood. At the risk of blasphemy, I think Ian Outred's Elf is at least its equal and may actually be prettier....

                                                      JohnT
                                                      ----- Original Message -----
                                                      From: Bruce Hallman
                                                      To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                                                      Sent: Thursday, February 01, 2007 2:46 PM
                                                      Subject: Re: [bolger] Re: Light Dory Type V


                                                      > Amen. Mine's the prettiest boat at the lake whenever she's there. A
                                                      > joy to row, and even better with two of us.

                                                      Certainly all true, (and this is now splitting hairs), but I think I
                                                      notice that during Phil Bolger's career that he has tended towards
                                                      giving increased buoyancy in the bow and stern of rowboats. I think
                                                      his hypothesis is that there is trade off of 'fine entry lines' versus
                                                      a gain from 'effective waterline length' which is slightly more
                                                      desireable in rowboats. I bet that the 'perfect' rowboat in PCB's
                                                      mind might have more fullness in the ends than a Light Dory V.

                                                      Though, I cannot argue that those long sweeping lines are gorgeous,
                                                      and might be spoiled if made more full in the ends.





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