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Re: [bolger] Sailing our creations

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  • David Ryan
    ... In my Light Scooner, when you get far enough of the wind (but not on a dead run) the foresail is completely blocked by the main. Sailing the foresail by
    Message 1 of 17 , Sep 2, 2002
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      >Bruce wrote:
      >"Sailing by the lee does not involve swinging the boom
      >ahead of the mast - I can't imagine why anyone would
      >try such a stunt."
      >
      >There are methods of self steering downwind that involve the main
      >and jib or double sails trimed angled out ahead of the mast, so boat
      >direction is self correcting... just one reason someone might try
      >"such a stunt".

      In my Light Scooner, when you get far enough of the wind (but not on
      a dead run) the foresail is completely blocked by the main. Sailing
      the foresail by the lee make the boat go faster, and balance better.

      YIBB,

      David

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    • wmrpage@aol.com
      In a message dated 9/1/02 7:11:28 PM Central Daylight Time, jboatguy@cs.com ... I m sure I came across on e-mail as more dogmatic than I intended - But thanks
      Message 2 of 17 , Sep 2, 2002
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        In a message dated 9/1/02 7:11:28 PM Central Daylight Time, jboatguy@...
        writes:


        > My impression is just about everything!
        >
        > Congratulations, you got my dander up with that comment....
        >

        I'm sure I came across on e-mail as more dogmatic than I intended - But
        thanks for the extended exegsis on this S-jibe business. I'm still not sure I
        fully grasp the concept, but I imagine it will become clearer as soon as I
        get an opportunity to try it out. Perhaps I'm quasi-S-jibing in some
        conditions without really grasping what I'm doing in those terms. Anyway,
        thanks for the citation and explanation!

        Ciao for Niao,
        Bill in MN


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • wmrpage@aol.com
        In a message dated 9/2/02 1:53:26 AM Central Daylight Time, ... In light airs, on certain courses, this gives more speed than running broad off. It s strickly
        Message 3 of 17 , Sep 2, 2002
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          In a message dated 9/2/02 1:53:26 AM Central Daylight Time,
          fountainb@... writes:


          > Sailing by the lee does not involve swinging the boom
          > ahead of the mast - I can't imagine why anyone would
          > try such a stunt.

          In light airs, on certain courses, this gives more speed than running broad
          off. It's strickly a light-air gambit as: (1) the boat heels to windward as
          the sail goes ahead of the mast; and then, the real excitement (2) the heel
          reverses when you sheet back in square off on a reach or to jibe, accompanied
          by some unusual steering dynamics. When the wind was too strong, I've managed
          to extricate myself from this by chasing boom and tacking. Perhaps I was 1/2
          way to re-inventing the "S-jibe" without realizing it! Anyway, it can be fun
          if you're ghosting around trying to eke the most out of light and uncertain
          winds.

          Ciao for Niao,
          Bill in MN


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Bruce Fountain
          ... I have never seen this, but it sounds like an interesting technique. It sounds like a dunking waiting to happen on a small, tender dinghy in heavy air.
          Message 4 of 17 , Sep 2, 2002
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            On Monday 02 September 2002 21:27, juliejj@... wrote:
            > There are methods of self steering downwind that involve the main and jib
            > or double sails trimed angled out ahead of the mast, so boat direction is
            > self correcting... just one reason someone might try "such a stunt".

            I have never seen this, but it sounds like an interesting technique. It
            sounds like a dunking waiting to happen on a small, tender dinghy in
            heavy air. These are usually cat rigged too, so I doubt if you could self
            steer.

            --
            Bruce Fountain (fountainb@...)
            Senior Software Engineer
            Union Switch and Signal Pty Ltd
            Perth Western Australia
            tel: +618 9256 0083
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