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Re: [bolger] Sailing our creations

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  • david@simplicityboats.com
    Bruce wrote: Sailing by the lee does not involve swinging the boom ahead of the mast - I can t imagine why anyone would try such a stunt. There are methods
    Message 1 of 17 , Sep 2, 2002
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      Bruce wrote:
      "Sailing by the lee does not involve swinging the boom
      ahead of the mast - I can't imagine why anyone would
      try such a stunt."

      There are methods of self steering downwind that involve the main and jib or double sails trimed angled out ahead of the mast, so boat direction is self correcting... just one reason someone might try "such a stunt".

      David
      www.simplicityboats.com
      ~~~/^\
      / \
      / /
      /_____/
      _______ /___/
      \__________/
      \/
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Bruce Fountain
      To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, September 02, 2002 2:47 AM
      Subject: Re: [bolger] Sailing our creations


      On Saturday 31 August 2002 08:06, wmrpage@... wrote:
      > In a message dated 8/30/02 1:22:44 AM Central Daylight Time,
      > jboatguy@...
      >
      > writes:
      > > You're right! I wonder what else I got wrong!
      >
      > My impression is just about everything!

      Charming...

      > There are very few boats which allow one to let the boom out ahead of the
      > mast ("sailing by the lee").

      Sailing by the lee does not involve swinging the boom
      ahead of the mast - I can't imagine why anyone would
      try such a stunt. The test is simple - if you are running off
      the wind, and both the sail and the wind are to port, then
      you are sailing by the lee. Everyone sails by the lee
      briefly as they jibe.

      --
      Bruce Fountain (fountainb@...)
      Senior Software Engineer
      Union Switch and Signal Pty Ltd
      Perth Western Australia
      tel: +618 9256 0083

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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • David Ryan
      ... In my Light Scooner, when you get far enough of the wind (but not on a dead run) the foresail is completely blocked by the main. Sailing the foresail by
      Message 2 of 17 , Sep 2, 2002
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        >Bruce wrote:
        >"Sailing by the lee does not involve swinging the boom
        >ahead of the mast - I can't imagine why anyone would
        >try such a stunt."
        >
        >There are methods of self steering downwind that involve the main
        >and jib or double sails trimed angled out ahead of the mast, so boat
        >direction is self correcting... just one reason someone might try
        >"such a stunt".

        In my Light Scooner, when you get far enough of the wind (but not on
        a dead run) the foresail is completely blocked by the main. Sailing
        the foresail by the lee make the boat go faster, and balance better.

        YIBB,

        David

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      • wmrpage@aol.com
        In a message dated 9/1/02 7:11:28 PM Central Daylight Time, jboatguy@cs.com ... I m sure I came across on e-mail as more dogmatic than I intended - But thanks
        Message 3 of 17 , Sep 2, 2002
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          In a message dated 9/1/02 7:11:28 PM Central Daylight Time, jboatguy@...
          writes:


          > My impression is just about everything!
          >
          > Congratulations, you got my dander up with that comment....
          >

          I'm sure I came across on e-mail as more dogmatic than I intended - But
          thanks for the extended exegsis on this S-jibe business. I'm still not sure I
          fully grasp the concept, but I imagine it will become clearer as soon as I
          get an opportunity to try it out. Perhaps I'm quasi-S-jibing in some
          conditions without really grasping what I'm doing in those terms. Anyway,
          thanks for the citation and explanation!

          Ciao for Niao,
          Bill in MN


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • wmrpage@aol.com
          In a message dated 9/2/02 1:53:26 AM Central Daylight Time, ... In light airs, on certain courses, this gives more speed than running broad off. It s strickly
          Message 4 of 17 , Sep 2, 2002
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            In a message dated 9/2/02 1:53:26 AM Central Daylight Time,
            fountainb@... writes:


            > Sailing by the lee does not involve swinging the boom
            > ahead of the mast - I can't imagine why anyone would
            > try such a stunt.

            In light airs, on certain courses, this gives more speed than running broad
            off. It's strickly a light-air gambit as: (1) the boat heels to windward as
            the sail goes ahead of the mast; and then, the real excitement (2) the heel
            reverses when you sheet back in square off on a reach or to jibe, accompanied
            by some unusual steering dynamics. When the wind was too strong, I've managed
            to extricate myself from this by chasing boom and tacking. Perhaps I was 1/2
            way to re-inventing the "S-jibe" without realizing it! Anyway, it can be fun
            if you're ghosting around trying to eke the most out of light and uncertain
            winds.

            Ciao for Niao,
            Bill in MN


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Bruce Fountain
            ... I have never seen this, but it sounds like an interesting technique. It sounds like a dunking waiting to happen on a small, tender dinghy in heavy air.
            Message 5 of 17 , Sep 2, 2002
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              On Monday 02 September 2002 21:27, juliejj@... wrote:
              > There are methods of self steering downwind that involve the main and jib
              > or double sails trimed angled out ahead of the mast, so boat direction is
              > self correcting... just one reason someone might try "such a stunt".

              I have never seen this, but it sounds like an interesting technique. It
              sounds like a dunking waiting to happen on a small, tender dinghy in
              heavy air. These are usually cat rigged too, so I doubt if you could self
              steer.

              --
              Bruce Fountain (fountainb@...)
              Senior Software Engineer
              Union Switch and Signal Pty Ltd
              Perth Western Australia
              tel: +618 9256 0083
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