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[bolger] Micro hardware

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  • pippobianco@tin.it
    Hi again. Do I really need to spend 140 US$ worth of stand up blocks (4 of them: 1 on the mast for the main snotter, 2 on the mast partner and one on the
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 4, 1999
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      Hi again. Do I really need to spend 140 US$ worth of stand up blocks (4
      of them: 1 on the mast for the main snotter, 2 on the mast partner and
      one on the transom for the main sheet) like Schaefer 303-62? Are they
      really needed? The hardware specified for the Long Micro looks
      different... Thanks, Pippo.
    • monica@chairlady.com
      (I m borrowing my friends computer tonight... this is really ernie@surfree.com) Before you spend all that money at the boat store, why not try a hardware
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 4, 1999
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        (I'm borrowing my friends computer tonight... this is really
        ernie@...)

        Before you spend all that money at the boat store, why not try a
        hardware store? The blocks there (call em "pullies" so the counter guy
        points you to the right aisle) will be much cheaper, and if you look
        around you'll find em in galvanized version too. (The wooden blocks
        they do stock look wonderful but will be far too large unless you're
        building a 100' fishing schooner.)

        I've only used the galvanized ones once on a sheet horse traveler on a
        Thomaston Galley, used it already over several seasons and havn't even
        bothered giving it WD-40 showers, looks and works like new, but I
        always did like the way it squeaks when the sheet is pulled tight thru
        it.
      • GHC
        Pippo, I used them, but you could use a regular block on an eye to turn your line to the cockpit. Or you could use bull s eye s - even cheaper. OR, you could
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 5, 1999
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          Pippo,

          I used them, but you could use a regular block on an eye to turn your line
          to the cockpit. Or you could use bull's eye's - even cheaper. OR, you
          could put cleats on the mast and go forward when you need to.

          For me, I don't mind spending on hardware since I like to trim sails. It
          took me one or two sails on the Light Schooner to get enough of that clever
          and thrifty running rigging... (actually, I stole some of those turning
          blocks off the Micro!)

          Given your choices, stainless screws get my vote with 2 drills - one with a
          countersink drill, and one with the screw driver. I keep intending to try
          McFeeley's square drive screws.

          I've actually gone to a 1/4" pneumatic stapler - bam, bam, bam (so do the
          Gudgeon Brothers - West epoxy) . I use epoxy and galvanised staples, but
          Monel is said to be available from Senco. It's a fantastic tool, the
          staples are cheap, and you can add as many as you want by squeezing the
          trigger.

          Gregg

          At 03:37 PM 9/4/99 -0700, you wrote:
          >Hi again. Do I really need to spend 140 US$ worth of stand up blocks (4
          >of them: 1 on the mast for the main snotter, 2 on the mast partner and
          >one on the transom for the main sheet) like Schaefer 303-62? Are they
          >really needed? The hardware specified for the Long Micro looks
          >different... Thanks, Pippo.
          >
          >
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