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sailing report on Micro

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  • dnjost
    Well, I have now had Micro out in a host of differing conditions. Here is a brief synopsis of how she handles. light air: Southwest/west 3-5kts, variable +
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 31, 2002
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      Well, I have now had Micro out in a host of differing conditions.
      Here is a brief synopsis of how she handles.

      light air: Southwest/west 3-5kts, variable + boat chop:
      infuriating. loosen up the snotter and mizzen and hope for the
      best. My boat had a real lee helm that was quite bothersome. I think
      that a larger mizzen or a sail with more roach could be very
      beneficial here. More sail area is definately needed.

      Northwest: gusty 15-18kts, Northwest, smooth water: boat develops
      just the right amount of weather helm to be comfortable without
      overpowering. Micro handles the gusts with ease and just heads up
      with a little heeling. Easily handled by easing the sheet or heading
      up, whichever comes first. Very enjoyable...too bad we had to go
      home! This boat could go like this for hours upon hours.

      We did experiment with the first set of reef points, but it did not
      deem necessary. Micro will go 4.5kts tops, after that she just digs
      a deeper hole in the water. Reefing would be beneficial in those
      conditions.

      I still hate the pegs on the sprits. I will be installing cheek
      blocks and jam cleats like I have had on other boats. Safe, secure,
      and simple. This will also make reefing a brainless process.

      regards, I need to get back on the water.
      David Jost
    • dnjost
      I will amend this message a little: today we had 7 kt SE. I discovered that the lee helm I was experiencing before was easily corrected by trimming the boat
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 1, 2002
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        I will amend this message a little:

        today we had 7 kt SE. I discovered that the lee helm I was
        experiencing before was easily corrected by trimming the boat so that
        the lee chine is just immersed. What a difference.

        As for the rig, I just read in Herreshoff's The Compleat Cruiser, of
        a neat arrangement for securing the clew using a block of wood with a
        hole in it screwed to one side, and a wooden thumb cleat opposite.
        One ties a stopper knot in a line and passes it through a hole in the
        block (similar to the snotter blocks that are drawn on my plans) and
        then through the clew grommet and the around the thumb cleat, back
        through the clew and then around the boom behind the cleat, secure
        with a couple of half hitches. Seems pretty simple! and cheap.


        > Well, I have now had Micro out in a host of differing conditions.
        > Here is a brief synopsis of how she handles.
        >
        > light air: Southwest/west 3-5kts, variable + boat chop:
        > infuriating. loosen up the snotter and mizzen and hope for the
        > best. My boat had a real lee helm that was quite bothersome. I
        think
        > that a larger mizzen or a sail with more roach could be very
        > beneficial here. More sail area is definately needed.
        >
        > Northwest: gusty 15-18kts, Northwest, smooth water: boat develops
        > just the right amount of weather helm to be comfortable without
        > overpowering. Micro handles the gusts with ease and just heads up
        > with a little heeling. Easily handled by easing the sheet or
        heading
        > up, whichever comes first. Very enjoyable...too bad we had to go
        > home! This boat could go like this for hours upon hours.
        >
        > We did experiment with the first set of reef points, but it did not
        > deem necessary. Micro will go 4.5kts tops, after that she just
        digs
        > a deeper hole in the water. Reefing would be beneficial in those
        > conditions.
        >
        > I still hate the pegs on the sprits. I will be installing cheek
        > blocks and jam cleats like I have had on other boats. Safe,
        secure,
        > and simple. This will also make reefing a brainless process.
        >
        > regards, I need to get back on the water.
        > David Jost
      • jhkohnen@boat-links.com
        You can t get much cheaper or simpler than a loop snugly fitted over the end of the boom. http://www.boat-links.com/images/ClewBecket.jpg ... -- John
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 3, 2002
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          You can't get much cheaper or simpler than a loop snugly fitted over the end
          of the boom. <g>

          http://www.boat-links.com/images/ClewBecket.jpg


          On Fri, 02 Aug 2002 02:25:16 -0000, David Jost wrote:
          > ...
          > As for the rig, I just read in Herreshoff's The Compleat Cruiser, of
          > a neat arrangement for securing the clew using a block of wood with a
          > hole in it screwed to one side, and a wooden thumb cleat opposite.
          > One ties a stopper knot in a line and passes it through a hole in the
          > block (similar to the snotter blocks that are drawn on my plans) and
          > then through the clew grommet and the around the thumb cleat, back
          > through the clew and then around the boom behind the cleat, secure
          > with a couple of half hitches. Seems pretty simple! and cheap.

          --
          John <jkohnen@...>
          http://www.boat-links.com/
          People say that life is the thing, but I prefer reading.
          <Logan Pearsall Smith>
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