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His and Her Dories

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  • David Ryan
    FBBB -- Well the bottom of my wife s Gull is file and sanded down. After dinner we flipped it over and I glued in a buttblock for the bottom panel. Maybe
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 24, 2002
      FBBB --

      Well the bottom of my wife's Gull is file and sanded down. After
      dinner we flipped it over and I glued in a buttblock for the bottom
      panel. Maybe tomorrow we'll put some fabric on the hull.

      How well fitting in frames, seats, etc goes remains to be seen, but
      so far I give this approach the thumbs up. I think Sue and I just
      made our lives harder by trying to put the frames into the boat while
      still on the jig. Of course given Sue's epoxy issues, who knows if
      her boat would have made it home intact without the interior joinery.

      At any rate, this has to be the easiest boat I've built yet. The
      panels fall into shape so easily all it takes is a little thicken
      epoxy and bricks to encourage them to stay in place. Easier and
      faster than all the carpentry involved in building the traditional
      way. With no frames in place, the inside of the chine can be filleted
      and glassed in one long run. I think that's going to end up be
      cleaner and easier than what we did the first go around.

      I like everything about Raka slow curing resin, except waiting for
      it. But as I'm not in a hurry the waiting is well offset by being
      able to work cleanly and accurately. The trick is to have a few
      projects going. I build a new, stouter tiller for my new kick up
      rudder for the LSME.

      I'd like to make foam-backed luan seats per Jim the Boatbuilder's
      suggestion, but Sue and I had such a tough time just getting 1/2
      plywood cut with all the right bevels to fit into place I'm a little
      intimidated trying to get a piece of 1/4 inch luan and 2 inch foam
      all lined up and bevelled correctly. Whatever I do, I'll make sure
      the seats are well supported by cleats, fillets, and/or tape! (Which
      reminds me, I should fix mine will I've got it here in the yard and
      batches of epoxy kicking off daily.

      With luck my wife and I will be heading off the beach, each in our
      own dory, to do some bass/fluke fishing before the end of the month!

      YIBB,

      David

      C.E.P.
      415 W.46th Street
      New York, New York 10036
      http://www.crumblingempire.com
      Mobile (646) 325-8325
      Office (212) 247-0296
    • trund1024
      David: Good luck with the rest of your wife s gull. I picked up two pieces of 1/2 particle board from the Home Depot and some extra 2 X 4 s. I had thought
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 25, 2002
        David:

        Good luck with the rest of your wife's gull.

        I picked up two pieces of 1/2" particle board from the Home Depot and
        some extra 2 X 4's. I had thought about cutting out only three of the
        molds for my Gull, but I changed my mind. I'd rather cut out all
        seven to ensure proper hull shape and bottom width. Since I will be
        using the stitch and glue method to build her with 1/4" Luan on the
        sides and 3/8" AC on the bottom, I want to make sure all the pieces
        stay in place until the epoxy sets up. Also, seeing all of the molds
        lined up on the jig will help in keeping me motivated during the
        project.

        Tonight I hope to pull out the old jig that I used to build my last
        boat and extend it from 14' to 16' to accomodate the Gull.

        Has anyone ever finished Home Depot Luan with varnish? Does it
        finish nicely?

        Tom









        --- In bolger@y..., David Ryan <david@c...> wrote:
        > FBBB --
        >
        > Well the bottom of my wife's Gull is file and sanded down. After
        > dinner we flipped it over and I glued in a buttblock for the bottom
        > panel. Maybe tomorrow we'll put some fabric on the hull.
        >
        > How well fitting in frames, seats, etc goes remains to be seen, but
        > so far I give this approach the thumbs up. I think Sue and I just
        > made our lives harder by trying to put the frames into the boat
        while
        > still on the jig. Of course given Sue's epoxy issues, who knows if
        > her boat would have made it home intact without the interior
        joinery.
        >
        > At any rate, this has to be the easiest boat I've built yet. The
        > panels fall into shape so easily all it takes is a little thicken
        > epoxy and bricks to encourage them to stay in place. Easier and
        > faster than all the carpentry involved in building the traditional
        > way. With no frames in place, the inside of the chine can be
        filleted
        > and glassed in one long run. I think that's going to end up be
        > cleaner and easier than what we did the first go around.
        >
        > I like everything about Raka slow curing resin, except waiting for
        > it. But as I'm not in a hurry the waiting is well offset by being
        > able to work cleanly and accurately. The trick is to have a few
        > projects going. I build a new, stouter tiller for my new kick up
        > rudder for the LSME.
        >
        > I'd like to make foam-backed luan seats per Jim the Boatbuilder's
        > suggestion, but Sue and I had such a tough time just getting 1/2
        > plywood cut with all the right bevels to fit into place I'm a
        little
        > intimidated trying to get a piece of 1/4 inch luan and 2 inch foam
        > all lined up and bevelled correctly. Whatever I do, I'll make sure
        > the seats are well supported by cleats, fillets, and/or tape!
        (Which
        > reminds me, I should fix mine will I've got it here in the yard and
        > batches of epoxy kicking off daily.
        >
        > With luck my wife and I will be heading off the beach, each in our
        > own dory, to do some bass/fluke fishing before the end of the month!
        >
        > YIBB,
        >
        > David
        >
        > C.E.P.
        > 415 W.46th Street
        > New York, New York 10036
        > http://www.crumblingempire.com
        > Mobile (646) 325-8325
        > Office (212) 247-0296
      • David Ryan
        ... On this latest boat I used a total of 12 of wire -- One loop at the top of the bow, and one at the bottom. The rest to the bow was held in alignment with
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 25, 2002
          > Since I will be
          >using the stitch and glue method to build her with 1/4" Luan on the
          >sides and 3/8" AC on the bottom, I want to make sure all the pieces
          >stay in place until the epoxy sets up. Also, seeing all of the molds
          >lined up on the jig will help in keeping me motivated during the
          >project.

          On this latest boat I used a total of 12" of wire -- One loop at the
          top of the bow, and one at the bottom. The rest to the bow was held
          in alignment with Scotch tape.

          No wire is needed for the bottom. Just butter the edges, and lay the
          bottom in place. A few bricks lined up along the edges will hold the
          bottom down while the epoxy sets up. Maybe your 3/8" AC will require
          a little more weight, but not much I guess.


          Sue and I screwed a couple of cleats into the molds at sheer level to
          keep the topsides from sagging/slipping down on the jig. This seems
          to be helpful in maintaining alignment.

          YIBB,

          David

          C.E.P.
          415 W.46th Street
          New York, New York 10036
          http://www.crumblingempire.com
          Mobile (646) 325-8325
          Office (212) 247-0296
        • mikestockstill
          His dory, her dory, dock - there is a poem in there somewhere...
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 25, 2002
            His dory, her dory, dock -

            there is a poem in there somewhere...
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