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[bolger] Re: glass boards in wooden boats

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  • Tim Smith
    samson family wrote: original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger/?start=2172 ... maintenance ... plane it ... Bill, that was
    Message 1 of 23 , Feb 1, 2000
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      "samson family" <bill.samso-@...> wrote:
      original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger/?start=2172
      > I've got the same problem as Tim. The major job in this year's
      maintenance
      > is to hoist the Chebacco high enough to get the **$£$! board out,
      plane it
      > down a bit, re-glass and epoxy it.


      Bill, that was my fix the last time around. Lasted two seasons. And
      the work was done by a reputable yard, not disreputable me.
    • Tim Smith
      orr, jamie wrote: original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger/?start=2167 ... or bend ... will ... warping! ... Jamie, my board was
      Message 2 of 23 , Feb 1, 2000
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        "orr, jamie" <jor-@...> wrote:
        original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger/?start=2167
        > Tim
        >
        > How is your board made? And how did it warp -- that is did it cup,
        or bend
        > longwise, or twist, or whatever?
        >
        > My own board is still standing in the shed, so I have no idea what
        will
        > happen when it gets wet. However, with three pieces of ply laminated
        > together, then covered in glass, I'm amazed it can even think about
        warping!
        >
        > Jamie Orr
        >
        Jamie, my board was made by Brad Story, who I guess is said to have
        wrangled with PCB about construction; don't know if any changes were
        made here. Haven't gotten a close enough look to say in which planes
        it's warped. I know it seems inconceivable--mine was planed, glassed
        and glued just two years ago. And Bill S. has the same problem.
      • Peter Vanderwaart
        My Stuart-built Mariner had a FG centerboard. No problems. Given a satisfactory way to build one, an FG board should work well. It would be heavy enought to do
        Message 3 of 23 , Feb 1, 2000
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          My Stuart-built Mariner had a FG centerboard. No problems.

          Given a satisfactory way to build one, an FG board should work well. It
          would be heavy enought to do without lead inserts - a great convenience
          in the building. If you don't have a wooden core, I see no reason to
          use epoxy instead of polyester.

          The problem with using wood or, more especially, foam as a core is that
          the board may turn out to have positive buoyancy.

          There was an article in the Catboat Bulletin some years ago by a man
          who made a new centerboard for his Marshall catboat using an aluminum
          core (which was quite flexible), covered by FG. I wonder if there is
          some other possibility in the stacks at Home Depot. Perhaps some sort
          waterproof panel material used behind tile walls in bathrooms or under
          showers could be used as a core material.

          Peter
        • djost
          My 1969 Enterprise racing dinghy, a Jack Holt design, has a wooden centerboard. It is made out of marine ply and definitely has positive buoyancy. This is
          Message 4 of 23 , Feb 1, 2000
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            My 1969 Enterprise racing dinghy, a Jack Holt design, has a wooden
            centerboard. It is made out of marine ply and definitely has positive
            buoyancy. This is offset by a grip that consists of what looks like a pair
            of rubber hoses (perhaps old bicycle tires) screwed down so that they grip
            the board just enough so that it does not pop back up. Upwind, the
            combination of leeway and the rubber grips holds the board down.
            Downwind, when the boat starts to come up on plane the board will lift
            about half way up due to the lack of leeward pressure and the speed of the
            boat. That is ok as the boat is much faster with the board raised anyway.

            The biggest problem is that the board is susceptible to breakage. I think
            that it is just strong enough to stand on to right a capsized craft. I had
            occasion to do this last August in Wychmere Harbor on Cape Cod. The mast
            was stuck in the mud and the board held me ok. I have broken two boards
            since 1969, but I think that would be expected on a craft this old.

            Peter Vanderwaart wrote:

            > My Stuart-built Mariner had a FG centerboard. No problems.
            >
            > Given a satisfactory way to build one, an FG board should work well. It
            > would be heavy enought to do without lead inserts - a great convenience
            > in the building. If you don't have a wooden core, I see no reason to
            > use epoxy instead of polyester.
            >
            > The problem with using wood or, more especially, foam as a core is that
            > the board may turn out to have positive buoyancy.
            >
            > There was an article in the Catboat Bulletin some years ago by a man
            > who made a new centerboard for his Marshall catboat using an aluminum
            > core (which was quite flexible), covered by FG. I wonder if there is
            > some other possibility in the stacks at Home Depot. Perhaps some sort
            > waterproof panel material used behind tile walls in bathrooms or under
            > showers could be used as a core material.
            >
            > Peter
            >
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          • Peter Vanderwaart
            Jack Holt used the same centerboard construction on the GP-14, which was the boat my family had when I was growing up. As I remember, the rubber friction
            Message 5 of 23 , Feb 1, 2000
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              Jack Holt used the same centerboard construction on the GP-14, which
              was the boat my family had when I was growing up. As I remember, the
              rubber friction device had a couple of screws. If you tightened them
              down, the rubber squished to the sides, increasing friction.

              Once when the friction wasn't holding the board down properly at a
              regatta, we tied it down. Then, when we hit a reef, the board broke at
              the pivot pin.

              Peter.

              djost <djos-@...> wrote:
              original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger/?start=2183
              > My 1969 Enterprise racing dinghy, a Jack Holt design, has a wooden
              > centerboard. It is made out of marine ply and definitely has positive
              > buoyancy. This is offset by a grip that consists of what looks like
              a pair
              > of rubber hoses (perhaps old bicycle tires) screwed down so that they
              grip
              > the board just enough so that it does not pop back up. Upwind, the
              > combination of leeway and the rubber grips holds the board down.
              > Downwind, when the boat starts to come up on plane the board will
              lift
              > about half way up due to the lack of leeward pressure and the speed
              of the
              > boat. That is ok as the boat is much faster with the board raised
              anyway.
              >
              > The biggest problem is that the board is susceptible to breakage. I
              think
              > that it is just strong enough to stand on to right a capsized craft.
              I had
              > occasion to do this last August in Wychmere Harbor on Cape Cod. The
              mast
              > was stuck in the mud and the board held me ok. I have broken two
              boards
              > since 1969, but I think that would be expected on a craft this old.
              >
              > Peter Vanderwaart wrote:
              >
              > > My Stuart-built Mariner had a FG centerboard. No problems.
              > >
              > > Given a satisfactory way to build one, an FG board should work
              well. It
              > > would be heavy enought to do without lead inserts - a great
              convenience
              > > in the building. If you don't have a wooden core, I see no reason to
              > > use epoxy instead of polyester.
              > >
              > > The problem with using wood or, more especially, foam as a core is
              that
              > > the board may turn out to have positive buoyancy.
              > >
              > > There was an article in the Catboat Bulletin some years ago by a man
              > > who made a new centerboard for his Marshall catboat using an
              aluminum
              > > core (which was quite flexible), covered by FG. I wonder if there is
              > > some other possibility in the stacks at Home Depot. Perhaps some
              sort
              > > waterproof panel material used behind tile walls in bathrooms or
              under
              > > showers could be used as a core material.
              > >
              > > Peter
              > >
            • Fraser Howell
              My Chebacco centreboard is a sandwich of 1/2 exterior ply enclosing 1/4 aluminum. I had originally glued it with an epoxy that was formulated to stick to
              Message 6 of 23 , Feb 1, 2000
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                My Chebacco centreboard is a sandwich of 1/2 " exterior ply enclosing
                1/4" aluminum. I had originally glued it with an epoxy that was
                formulated to stick to Al, but the board had started to delaminate by
                the end of the first season. I then wrapped the edges in cloth and
                epoxy, but that got stuck in the case by mid-summer. I've given up on
                glue for the centrboard, and on trying to make the affair waterproof. I
                riveted the whole thing with copper rivets prior to last season, and
                have had no problems. The board is rigid, and takes the ground well, and
                only needed about 3 lb of lead to sink properly.
                The Chebacco rudder is welded al, and it has held up well. It has a
                horizontal plate on the bottom, and I use it as a boarding ladder when
                swimming.
                Cheers;
                Fraser Howell
              • Robert N. Lundy
                Oooo.... Every once in while (ok, pretty often) I m amazed at some of the original thinking on this list. Using the concrete backerboard from Home Depot would
                Message 7 of 23 , Feb 1, 2000
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                  Oooo....

                  Every once in while (ok, pretty often) I'm amazed at some of the original
                  thinking on this list. Using the concrete backerboard from Home Depot would
                  give some heft and glass/epoxy should stick. And you could leave out the
                  lead as the concrete might have enough negative bouancy to sink the whole
                  thing. And this is a product that's designed to withstand water in the
                  first place.

                  Neat idea. Who wants to try it?

                  Robert & Amy Lundy
                  St. Petersburg, fla.
                  robert@...
                  amy@...


                  > -----Original Message-----
                  > From: Peter Vanderwaart [mailto:pvanderw@...]
                  > Sent: February 01, 2000 2:48 PM
                  > To: bolger@...
                  > Subject: [bolger] Re: glass boards in wooden boats
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > My Stuart-built Mariner had a FG centerboard. No problems.
                  >
                  > Given a satisfactory way to build one, an FG board should work well. It
                  > would be heavy enought to do without lead inserts - a great convenience
                  > in the building. If you don't have a wooden core, I see no reason to
                  > use epoxy instead of polyester.
                  >
                  > The problem with using wood or, more especially, foam as a core is that
                  > the board may turn out to have positive buoyancy.
                  >
                  > There was an article in the Catboat Bulletin some years ago by a man
                  > who made a new centerboard for his Marshall catboat using an aluminum
                  > core (which was quite flexible), covered by FG. I wonder if there is
                  > some other possibility in the stacks at Home Depot. Perhaps some sort
                  > waterproof panel material used behind tile walls in bathrooms or under
                  > showers could be used as a core material.
                  >
                  > Peter
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  > GET A NEXTCARD VISA, in 30 seconds! Get rates as low as 0.0%
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                • Lincoln Ross
                  An aircraft homebuilding book I have says that gluing to aluminum can be very difficult. All sorts of very careful surface prep required to get a really
                  Message 8 of 23 , Feb 1, 2000
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                    An aircraft homebuilding book I have says that gluing to aluminum can
                    be very difficult. All sorts of very careful surface prep required to
                    get a really reliable joint. scrub, phosphoric acid, distilled water
                    rinse, proper handling of cleaning rags, etc. CLeanliness absolutely
                    critical. Not to even be touched with hands. One trick was to put on
                    thin layer of slow epoxy and THEN do a final scrub, as epoxy would
                    prevent oxidation, etc. Of course you'd have to wipe the debris off.

                    fraser.howel-@... (fraser howell) wrote:
                    snipglued it with an epoxy that was
                    > formulated to stick to Al, but the board had started to delaminate by
                    > the end of the first season.
                    >
                  • John Bell
                    I knew a guy who built wooden kayak paddles. He used aluminum plate sandwiched in between the wooden faces to make a durable tip. He said he tried everything
                    Message 9 of 23 , Feb 1, 2000
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                      I knew a guy who built wooden kayak paddles. He used aluminum plate
                      sandwiched in between the wooden faces to make a durable tip. He said he
                      tried everything to get that aluminum to stick because the tips getting
                      knocked out was the number one reason for returns. His solution to the
                      problem was pretty simple. He would drill a number of holes in the aluminum.
                      Then, he'd thread the holes with thick fiberglass yarn pulled off a piece of
                      heavy glass cloth. Then he would slather the slot in the tip of the paddle
                      with epoxy and slide the aluminum tip in. He later converted to plastic tips
                      using this technique. I suspect it would work pretty well for making a
                      plywood centerboard with an aluminum center, too.

                      John Bell
                      Kennesaw, GA
                      jmbell@...
                      http://jmbell.home.mindspring.com


                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: Lincoln Ross <lincolnr@...>
                      To: <bolger@...>
                      Sent: Tuesday, February 01, 2000 9:32 PM
                      Subject: [bolger] Re: glass boards in wooden boats


                      > An aircraft homebuilding book I have says that gluing to aluminum can
                      > be very difficult. All sorts of very careful surface prep required to
                      > get a really reliable joint. scrub, phosphoric acid, distilled water
                      > rinse, proper handling of cleaning rags, etc. CLeanliness absolutely
                      > critical. Not to even be touched with hands. One trick was to put on
                      > thin layer of slow epoxy and THEN do a final scrub, as epoxy would
                      > prevent oxidation, etc. Of course you'd have to wipe the debris off.
                      >
                      > fraser.howel-@... (fraser howell) wrote:
                      > snipglued it with an epoxy that was
                      > > formulated to stick to Al, but the board had started to delaminate by
                      > > the end of the first season.
                      > >
                      >
                      >
                      > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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                    • Lincoln Ross
                      The aircraft book I have says to do both. BUt then again, your boat will still float if your board brakes. I think the epoxy layer helps, but if you have a
                      Message 10 of 23 , Feb 1, 2000
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                        The aircraft book I have says to do both. BUt then again, your boat
                        will still float if your board brakes. I think the epoxy layer helps,
                        but if you have a little oil in there I'll bet you are still sunk.

                        david <galvin-@...> wrote:
                        original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/bolger/?start=2202
                        > Lincoln:
                        > The Gougeon Brothers describe a technique of bonding epoxy to metals
                        where
                        > you clean the metal up and apply a layer of epoxy, then scrub the wet
                        > epoxied surface with stainless steel wool or wet and dry sandpapersnip
                        > > An aircraft homebuilding book I have says that snip
                      • david
                        Lincoln: The Gougeon Brothers describe a technique of bonding epoxy to metals where you clean the metal up and apply a layer of epoxy, then scrub the wet
                        Message 11 of 23 , Feb 1, 2000
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                          Lincoln:
                          The Gougeon Brothers describe a technique of bonding epoxy to metals where you clean the metal up and apply a layer of epoxy, then scrub the wet epoxied surface with stainless steel wool or wet and dry sandpaper to achieve a raw surface onto which the epoxy and thus the wood, can bond. The sanding dust remains in the epoxy, where it presumably does no harm. I haven't tried this, but it seems workable on aluminum, and would save you the demanding surface prep that is usually required, as you suggest. Someone mentioned fastening the plywood to the aluminum with copper rivets, I think. In seawater I believe this would turn the board into a nice battery and rapidly devour the aluminum. You could get away with it in most fresh water environments, however,
                          david

                          Lincoln Ross wrote:

                          An aircraft homebuilding book I have says that gluing to aluminum can
                          be very difficult. All sorts of very careful surface prep required to
                          get a really reliable joint. scrub, phosphoric acid, distilled water
                          rinse, proper handling of cleaning rags, etc. CLeanliness absolutely
                          critical. Not to even be touched with hands.  One trick was to put on
                          thin layer of slow epoxy and THEN do a final scrub, as epoxy would
                          prevent oxidation, etc. Of course you'd have to wipe the debris off.

                          fraser.howel-@... (fraser howell) wrote:
                          snipglued it with an epoxy that was
                          > formulated to stick to Al, but the board had started to delaminate by
                          > the end of the first season.
                          >

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                        • Bill Samson
                          ... A wee bit of lateral thinking here - but have you checked the slot and made sure that it s not getting narrower (i.e. sides swelling)? That d have the
                          Message 12 of 23 , Feb 2, 2000
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                            >get the **$�$! board out,
                            >plane it
                            > > down a bit, re-glass and epoxy it.
                            >
                            >
                            >Bill, that was my fix the last time around. Lasted two seasons. And
                            >the work was done by a reputable yard, not disreputable me.
                            >
                            >

                            A wee bit of lateral thinking here - but have you checked the slot and made
                            sure that it's not getting narrower (i.e. sides swelling)? That'd have the
                            same effect as a swelling board (though harder to fix). The slot should be
                            1.5" wide all over. The board should be 1.25" thick in the middle.

                            Have PCB&F got any views on the suitability of a steel centreplate for a
                            Chebacco?

                            Bill

                            Bill

                            Bill
                            ______________________________________________________
                          • Fries, John
                            Very interresting. A discussion a few days back about the relative ease of building the Single Handed Schooner vs. Light Schooner focused on the lead in the
                            Message 13 of 23 , Feb 2, 2000
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                              Very interresting. A discussion a few days back about the relative ease of
                              building the Single Handed Schooner vs. Light Schooner focused on the lead
                              in the centerboard. How about using concrete? I know it wouldn't be as
                              heavy as the lead, but, if you coated the interior of the void to be filled
                              with epoxy first, that could address concerns about rot at the wood/concrete
                              interface. Probably would coat the outside of the concrete with epoxy for
                              further waterproofing. Is this crazy?

                              > -----Original Message-----
                              > From: Robert N. Lundy [SMTP:robert@...]
                              > Sent: Tuesday, February 01, 2000 5:41 PM
                              > To: bolger@egroups.com
                              > Subject: [bolger] Re: glass boards in wooden boats
                              >
                              > Oooo....
                              >
                              > Every once in while (ok, pretty often) I'm amazed at some of the original
                              > thinking on this list. Using the concrete backerboard from Home Depot
                              > would
                              > give some heft and glass/epoxy should stick. And you could leave out the
                              > lead as the concrete might have enough negative bouancy to sink the whole
                              > thing. And this is a product that's designed to withstand water in the
                              > first place.
                              >
                              > Neat idea. Who wants to try it?
                              >
                              > Robert & Amy Lundy
                              > St. Petersburg, fla.
                              > robert@...
                              > amy@...
                              >
                              >
                              > > -----Original Message-----
                              > > From: Peter Vanderwaart [mailto:pvanderw@...]
                              > > Sent: February 01, 2000 2:48 PM
                              > > To: bolger@...
                              > > Subject: [bolger] Re: glass boards in wooden boats
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > My Stuart-built Mariner had a FG centerboard. No problems.
                              > >
                              > > Given a satisfactory way to build one, an FG board should work well. It
                              > > would be heavy enought to do without lead inserts - a great convenience
                              > > in the building. If you don't have a wooden core, I see no reason to
                              > > use epoxy instead of polyester.
                              > >
                              > > The problem with using wood or, more especially, foam as a core is that
                              > > the board may turn out to have positive buoyancy.
                              > >
                              > > There was an article in the Catboat Bulletin some years ago by a man
                              > > who made a new centerboard for his Marshall catboat using an aluminum
                              > > core (which was quite flexible), covered by FG. I wonder if there is
                              > > some other possibility in the stacks at Home Depot. Perhaps some sort
                              > > waterproof panel material used behind tile walls in bathrooms or under
                              > > showers could be used as a core material.
                              > >
                              > > Peter
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                              > > GET A NEXTCARD VISA, in 30 seconds! Get rates as low as 0.0%
                              > > Intro APR and no hidden fees. Apply NOW!
                              > > http://click.egroups.com/1/975/5/_/3457/_/949434489/
                              > >
                              > > -- 20 megs of disk space in your group's Document Vault
                              > > -- http://www.egroups.com/docvault/bolger/?m=1
                              > >
                              > >
                              >
                              >
                              > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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                            • Fries, John
                              Yes, that s a good point and another very good idea. Having all these minds working on a problem is an example of the net acting as a distributed processing
                              Message 14 of 23 , Feb 2, 2000
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                                Yes, that's a good point and another very good idea. Having all these minds
                                working on a problem is an example of the net acting as a 'distributed
                                processing platform' for all of us biological computers.

                                > -----Original Message-----
                                > From: Chuck Leinweber [SMTP:duckworks@...]
                                > Sent: Wednesday, February 02, 2000 3:15 PM
                                > To: bolger@egroups.com
                                > Subject: [bolger] Re: glass boards in wooden boats
                                >
                                > John:
                                >
                                > IMHO the advantage of concrete for ballast is it's ability to conform to
                                > odd
                                > shapes in the bilges of larger (preferably steel) boats. Wouldn't steel
                                > plate encased in epoxy would be better than concrete in this application?
                                >
                                > Chuck Leinweber
                                > Duckworks Magazine
                                > http://www.duckworksmagazine.com
                                >
                                >
                                > ----- Original Message -----
                                > From: Fries, John <John.Fries@...>
                                > To: <bolger@egroups.com>
                                > Sent: Wednesday, February 02, 2000 6:55 AM
                                > Subject: [bolger] Re: glass boards in wooden boats
                                >
                                >
                                > > Very interresting. A discussion a few days back about the relative ease
                                > of
                                > > building the Single Handed Schooner vs. Light Schooner focused on the
                                > lead
                                > > in the centerboard. How about using concrete? I know it wouldn't be as
                                > > heavy as the lead, but, if you coated the interior of the void to be
                                > filled
                                > > with epoxy first, that could address concerns about rot at the
                                > wood/concrete
                                > > interface. Probably would coat the outside of the concrete with epoxy
                                > for
                                > > further waterproofing. Is this crazy?
                                > >
                                > > > -----Original Message-----
                                > > > From: Robert N. Lundy [SMTP:robert@...]
                                > > > Sent: Tuesday, February 01, 2000 5:41 PM
                                > > > To: bolger@egroups.com
                                > > > Subject: [bolger] Re: glass boards in wooden boats
                                > > >
                                > > > Oooo....
                                > > >
                                > > > Every once in while (ok, pretty often) I'm amazed at some of the
                                > original
                                > > > thinking on this list. Using the concrete backerboard from Home Depot
                                > > > would
                                > > > give some heft and glass/epoxy should stick. And you could leave out
                                > the
                                > > > lead as the concrete might have enough negative bouancy to sink the
                                > whole
                                > > > thing. And this is a product that's designed to withstand water in
                                > the
                                > > > first place.
                                > > >
                                > > > Neat idea. Who wants to try it?
                                > > >
                                > > > Robert & Amy Lundy
                                > > > St. Petersburg, fla.
                                > > > robert@...
                                > > > amy@...
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > > > -----Original Message-----
                                > > > > From: Peter Vanderwaart [mailto:pvanderw@...]
                                > > > > Sent: February 01, 2000 2:48 PM
                                > > > > To: bolger@...
                                > > > > Subject: [bolger] Re: glass boards in wooden boats
                                > > > >
                                > > > >
                                > > > >
                                > > > > My Stuart-built Mariner had a FG centerboard. No problems.
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Given a satisfactory way to build one, an FG board should work well.
                                > It
                                > > > > would be heavy enought to do without lead inserts - a great
                                > convenience
                                > > > > in the building. If you don't have a wooden core, I see no reason to
                                > > > > use epoxy instead of polyester.
                                > > > >
                                > > > > The problem with using wood or, more especially, foam as a core is
                                > that
                                > > > > the board may turn out to have positive buoyancy.
                                > > > >
                                > > > > There was an article in the Catboat Bulletin some years ago by a man
                                > > > > who made a new centerboard for his Marshall catboat using an
                                > aluminum
                                > > > > core (which was quite flexible), covered by FG. I wonder if there is
                                > > > > some other possibility in the stacks at Home Depot. Perhaps some
                                > sort
                                > > > > waterproof panel material used behind tile walls in bathrooms or
                                > under
                                > > > > showers could be used as a core material.
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Peter
                                > > > >
                                > > > >
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                              • Chuck Leinweber
                                John: IMHO the advantage of concrete for ballast is it s ability to conform to odd shapes in the bilges of larger (preferably steel) boats. Wouldn t steel
                                Message 15 of 23 , Feb 2, 2000
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  John:

                                  IMHO the advantage of concrete for ballast is it's ability to conform to odd
                                  shapes in the bilges of larger (preferably steel) boats. Wouldn't steel
                                  plate encased in epoxy would be better than concrete in this application?

                                  Chuck Leinweber
                                  Duckworks Magazine
                                  http://www.duckworksmagazine.com


                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  From: Fries, John <John.Fries@...>
                                  To: <bolger@egroups.com>
                                  Sent: Wednesday, February 02, 2000 6:55 AM
                                  Subject: [bolger] Re: glass boards in wooden boats


                                  > Very interresting. A discussion a few days back about the relative ease
                                  of
                                  > building the Single Handed Schooner vs. Light Schooner focused on the lead
                                  > in the centerboard. How about using concrete? I know it wouldn't be as
                                  > heavy as the lead, but, if you coated the interior of the void to be
                                  filled
                                  > with epoxy first, that could address concerns about rot at the
                                  wood/concrete
                                  > interface. Probably would coat the outside of the concrete with epoxy for
                                  > further waterproofing. Is this crazy?
                                  >
                                  > > -----Original Message-----
                                  > > From: Robert N. Lundy [SMTP:robert@...]
                                  > > Sent: Tuesday, February 01, 2000 5:41 PM
                                  > > To: bolger@egroups.com
                                  > > Subject: [bolger] Re: glass boards in wooden boats
                                  > >
                                  > > Oooo....
                                  > >
                                  > > Every once in while (ok, pretty often) I'm amazed at some of the
                                  original
                                  > > thinking on this list. Using the concrete backerboard from Home Depot
                                  > > would
                                  > > give some heft and glass/epoxy should stick. And you could leave out
                                  the
                                  > > lead as the concrete might have enough negative bouancy to sink the
                                  whole
                                  > > thing. And this is a product that's designed to withstand water in the
                                  > > first place.
                                  > >
                                  > > Neat idea. Who wants to try it?
                                  > >
                                  > > Robert & Amy Lundy
                                  > > St. Petersburg, fla.
                                  > > robert@...
                                  > > amy@...
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > > > -----Original Message-----
                                  > > > From: Peter Vanderwaart [mailto:pvanderw@...]
                                  > > > Sent: February 01, 2000 2:48 PM
                                  > > > To: bolger@...
                                  > > > Subject: [bolger] Re: glass boards in wooden boats
                                  > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > > > My Stuart-built Mariner had a FG centerboard. No problems.
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Given a satisfactory way to build one, an FG board should work well.
                                  It
                                  > > > would be heavy enought to do without lead inserts - a great
                                  convenience
                                  > > > in the building. If you don't have a wooden core, I see no reason to
                                  > > > use epoxy instead of polyester.
                                  > > >
                                  > > > The problem with using wood or, more especially, foam as a core is
                                  that
                                  > > > the board may turn out to have positive buoyancy.
                                  > > >
                                  > > > There was an article in the Catboat Bulletin some years ago by a man
                                  > > > who made a new centerboard for his Marshall catboat using an aluminum
                                  > > > core (which was quite flexible), covered by FG. I wonder if there is
                                  > > > some other possibility in the stacks at Home Depot. Perhaps some sort
                                  > > > waterproof panel material used behind tile walls in bathrooms or under
                                  > > > showers could be used as a core material.
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Peter
                                  > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > >
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