Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Electrical Panel

Expand Messages
  • Bob Johnson
    Bill, As luck would have it, I just removed a very similar panel from the small sailboat I am rehabbing. On the one I have, the three fuses are tied together
    Message 1 of 17 , Jul 4 7:15 PM
      Bill,

      As luck would have it, I just removed a very similar panel from the small
      sailboat I am rehabbing. On the one I have, the three fuses are tied together
      with a copper strip (where you show red wire) and likewise the connected sides
      of the switches are jumpered with another strip. The ends of these busbar
      strips is just the right size for a crimp terminal fitting to slide over. It
      sounds like yours does not have these. In any case, connect your positive
      battery terminal to the red wire side of the fuses ( the top of your drawing).
      The negative battery terminal goes to the black wire side of the switches, and
      here also go all the negative leads of your circuits. The plus sides of your
      circuits go to the switch terminals (Z in your drawing).

      The switch ST is a battery test switch, just gives a reading of the voltage.

      Hope this is clear. Sounds like you might have to solder some wires on to be
      able to make the connections to the battery.

      Bob

      >
      > + + + + + + + + + + + + + <-------Positive Battery
      > + + + + +
      > + + + + +
      > F + F F F
      > + + + + +
      > + + + + +
      > C V SL SL SL
      > x * Z Z Z <----three circuits positive leads
      > x * x x x
      > x ST x x x
      > x-----x-----x-----x-----x <-----Negative Battery & circuits tied together
      >
      > "+" = red wiring
      > "x" & "--" = black wiring
      > "*" = red jumper between "ST" and "V"
      > "F" = fuse
      > "C" = 12V socket (cigarette lighter)
      > "V" = voltmeter (evidently in circuit only when "ST" is pressed.)
      > "SL" = illuminated light switch (3 - "navigation", "anchor" & "cabin")
      > "Z" = bare third electrical connection on "SL"
      > "ST" = test switch for voltmeter
      >
    • wmrpage@aol.com
      In a message dated 7/5/02 1:10:43 AM Central Daylight Time, bobzonk@erols.com ... THANK YOU, BOB!! It s a pity I ve never bothered to learn how to check out my
      Message 2 of 17 , Jul 7 9:23 AM
        In a message dated 7/5/02 1:10:43 AM Central Daylight Time, bobzonk@...
        writes:


        > Hope this is clear. Sounds like you might have to solder some wires on to
        > be
        > able to make the connections to the battery.
        >
        > Bob
        >

        THANK YOU, BOB!!

        It's a pity I've never bothered to learn how to check out my e-mail when out
        of town. If I'd received your advice on the 5th when it was posted, the job
        would be done already. As it was I left the panel untouched and jury-rigged
        the lights for the weekend.

        In the case of my panel (West Marine "Economy 12V"), the "bus" function is
        performed by spring-loaded, slip-on clips over tangs ("spades"?). The
        intermediate clips are designed to take two wires, so that the clip itself
        performs both the "bus" and distribution functions. The terminal clips on
        each "bus" only accomodates one wire. I suppose that the neat way to do the
        connection would be to replace one terminal clip on each of the "bus"
        circuits with a two-wire clip. The jumpers between each clip are no longer
        than necessary, however, so I don't know if they are long enough, assuming I
        can find equivalent "two-wire" clips. "Some soldering may be required!" I
        wonder why the the panel manufacturer did use a "two-wire" clips at one end
        each of the "bus" circuits, with a short lead ("pigtail"?) for the battery
        connections. Had it done so, I would have connected the panel to power and
        figured out the light circuit connections from there.

        As far as the negative ("ground") returns from the light circuits, is there
        any reason why they shouldn't be connected directly to the battery? It would
        be easy enough to run the panel negative, the running lights negative and the
        anchor light negative to a common lug at the battery terminal. Connecting the
        light circuit returns to the panel negative wire would require more
        connections, which I think are to be avoided, when possible. Any
        recommendations?

        I had an interesting failure on the 4th. I was removing the positive primary
        battery cable to the outboard motor when it broke off without the slightest
        provocation. I had inspected the lug this Spring, when I gave the positive
        battery terminal an inspection and brisk scrub with baking soda to remove
        some corrosion. I'd removed and re-attached the cable from the battery at
        least a few times in the course of relocating the battery and futzing about
        with the wiring and did not detect any problems. Indeed the surfaces of the
        broken lug showed no sign of corrosion, with the exception of the fracture
        surface, which obviously failed because of corrosion. It was fortunate that
        it happed at dock, but rather sobering to learn that mere visual inspection
        of a battery teminal cable lug is no assurance of its condition!

        Anyway, thanks ever so much for your instructions!

        Ciao for Niao,
        Bill in MN


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Sam Glasscock
        Does anyone in the group have experience with the E. Punt and whether the boat needs a skeg to row well? E.P. is a flat bottomed pram with two 1.5 by 3/4
        Message 3 of 17 , Jul 7 9:50 AM
          Does anyone in the group have experience with the E.
          Punt and whether the boat needs a skeg to row well?
          E.P. is a flat bottomed pram with two 1.5" by 3/4"
          shoes in way of a keel. Seems to me this would keep
          her running straight (rowing) with minimal attention,
          but I have read elsewhere that others recommend a
          hefty skeg. Now is the time to install a skeg if I'm
          going to do it. Any help would be appreciated.
          Thanks, Sam.

          __________________________________________________
          Do You Yahoo!?
          Sign up for SBC Yahoo! Dial - First Month Free
          http://sbc.yahoo.com
        • proaconstrictor
          ... I put a skeg on my EP, probably because after cutting out the patterns, I never again looked at the book to finish it off and just did what was done on the
          Message 4 of 17 , Jul 7 12:25 PM
            :
            > Does anyone in the group have experience with the E.
            > Punt and whether the boat needs a skeg to row well?
            > E.P. is a flat bottomed pram with two 1.5" by 3/4"
            > shoes in way of a keel. Seems to me this would keep
            > her running straight

            I put a skeg on my EP, probably because after cutting out the
            patterns, I never again looked at the book to finish it off and just
            did what was done on the Nymph. With a skeg, she can be spun
            effortlessly, but tracks nicely. I didn't do the bottom rails, but
            would imagine they would work also. With this much rocker, she is
            going to spin freely, and respond to any inequilibrium in rowing.
            But I have never had any trouble holding her on course. I think the
            skeg is potentially a little more fragile, though mine is well coved
            on. Also it provides less protection to the flat bottom. The only
            disadvantage to the rails is that they would be a fair bit more work,
            depending on the level of finish. Possibly more drag also. I would
            not add both, in a belt and braces way. Adding the skeg as an
            afterthought would hardly be any more trouble than adding her now,
            depending on your approach to paint.
          • dnjost
            ... Sam, I built a Bolger Nymph, which looks like a similar design. The skeg was very beneficial when rowing and towing. I hope that helps. If Bolger
            Message 5 of 17 , Jul 7 3:08 PM
              --- In bolger@y..., Sam Glasscock <glasscocklanding@y...> wrote:
              Sam,
              I built a Bolger Nymph, which looks like a similar design. The
              skeg was very beneficial when rowing and towing. I hope that helps.
              If Bolger designed it, then it is probably there for a reason. From
              building Micro, I can assure you that Bolger has a rhyme or reason
              for most things on his designs. The only thing I altered on Micro
              was to add some substantial mooring gear in the way of a bow cleat
              and chocks. I will also add an electrical system at some point as I
              hate to come when early because it is getting dark.

              Good Luck,
              David Jost

              >
              > __________________________________________________
              > Do You Yahoo!?
              > Sign up for SBC Yahoo! Dial - First Month Free
              > http://sbc.yahoo.com
            • Sam Glasscock
              Thanks, David, and the others who have responded. Bolger shows a skeg on the Nymph, but shoes and no keel on the E. Punt. Some of the discussion on the Payson
              Message 6 of 17 , Jul 8 5:24 AM
                Thanks, David, and the others who have responded.
                Bolger shows a skeg on the Nymph, but shoes and no
                keel on the E. Punt. Some of the discussion on the
                Payson site indicates that the Punt suffers from lack
                of a skeg, but I will just put on the shoes. She is
                to be a housetop dinghy for my Topaz, and the keel
                would make it harder to draw her over the rail on the
                Topaz. Sam

                > Sam,
                > I built a Bolger Nymph, which looks like a
                > similar design. The
                > skeg was very beneficial when rowing and towing. > >

                __________________________________________________
                Do You Yahoo!?
                Sign up for SBC Yahoo! Dial - First Month Free
                http://sbc.yahoo.com
              • jas_orr
                Elegant Punt rows fine as designed. Keep the bow up and she goes as well as any 8 footer can. Jamie Orr
                Message 7 of 17 , Jul 14 10:02 AM
                  Elegant Punt rows fine as designed. Keep the bow up and she goes as
                  well as any 8 footer can.

                  Jamie Orr

                  --- In bolger@y..., Sam Glasscock <glasscocklanding@y...> wrote:
                  > Does anyone in the group have experience with the E.
                  > Punt and whether the boat needs a skeg to row well?
                  > E.P. is a flat bottomed pram with two 1.5" by 3/4"
                  > shoes in way of a keel. Seems to me this would keep
                  > her running straight (rowing) with minimal attention,
                  > but I have read elsewhere that others recommend a
                  > hefty skeg. Now is the time to install a skeg if I'm
                  > going to do it. Any help would be appreciated.
                  > Thanks, Sam.
                  >
                  > __________________________________________________
                  > Do You Yahoo!?
                  > Sign up for SBC Yahoo! Dial - First Month Free
                  > http://sbc.yahoo.com
                • dbaldnz
                  That s interesting Jamie. I found the tracking of my elegant punt was hugely improved with the addition of a small skeg, bow up, bow down or wherever. DonB ...
                  Message 8 of 17 , Jul 14 3:23 PM
                    That's interesting Jamie.
                    I found the tracking of my elegant punt was hugely improved with the
                    addition of a small skeg, bow up, bow down or wherever.
                    DonB

                    --- In bolger@y..., "jas_orr" <jas_orr@y...> wrote:
                    > Elegant Punt rows fine as designed. Keep the bow up and she goes
                    as
                    > well as any 8 footer can.
                    >
                    > Jamie Orr
                    >
                    > --- In bolger@y..., Sam Glasscock <glasscocklanding@y...> wrote:
                    > > Does anyone in the group have experience with the E.
                    > > Punt and whether the boat needs a skeg to row well?
                    > > E.P. is a flat bottomed pram with two 1.5" by 3/4"
                    > > shoes in way of a keel. Seems to me this would keep
                    > > her running straight (rowing) with minimal attention,
                    > > but I have read elsewhere that others recommend a
                    > > hefty skeg. Now is the time to install a skeg if I'm
                    > > going to do it. Any help would be appreciated.
                    > > Thanks, Sam.
                    > >
                    > > __________________________________________________
                    > > Do You Yahoo!?
                    > > Sign up for SBC Yahoo! Dial - First Month Free
                    > > http://sbc.yahoo.com
                  • proaconstrictor
                    Tracking is also affected by displacement. ... the
                    Message 9 of 17 , Jul 14 3:57 PM
                      Tracking is also affected by displacement.

                      --- In bolger@y..., "dbaldnz" <oink@p...> wrote:
                      > That's interesting Jamie.
                      > I found the tracking of my elegant punt was hugely improved with
                      the
                      > addition of a small skeg, bow up, bow down or wherever.
                      >
                    • dbaldnz
                      I m not that overweight proa :) But it stands to reason that a very short flat bottom light boat with no central lateral resistance needs a fin aft to keep her
                      Message 10 of 17 , Jul 14 10:06 PM
                        I'm not that overweight proa :)
                        But it stands to reason that a very short flat bottom light boat with
                        no central lateral resistance needs a fin aft to keep her straight.
                        My punt was very squirrelly under oars....you had to row with
                        pefection. The very small skeg made my oarsmanship look normal, no
                        matter what the load.
                        DonB

                        --- In bolger@y..., "proaconstrictor" <proaconstrictor@y...> wrote:
                        > Tracking is also affected by displacement.
                        >
                        > --- In bolger@y..., "dbaldnz" <oink@p...> wrote:
                        > > That's interesting Jamie.
                        > > I found the tracking of my elegant punt was hugely improved with
                        > the
                        > > addition of a small skeg, bow up, bow down or wherever.
                        > >
                      • staehpj1
                        ... with ... I always found the need for skegs to be overstated, when compared to my personal impression. I wouldn t think one was needed on an Elegant Punt.
                        Message 11 of 17 , Jul 15 4:14 AM
                          --- In bolger@y..., "dbaldnz" <oink@p...> wrote:
                          > I'm not that overweight proa :)
                          > But it stands to reason that a very short flat bottom light boat
                          with
                          > no central lateral resistance needs a fin aft to keep her straight.
                          > My punt was very squirrelly under oars....you had to row with
                          > pefection. The very small skeg made my oarsmanship look normal, no
                          > matter what the load.
                          > DonB

                          I always found the need for skegs to be overstated, when compared to
                          my personal impression. I wouldn't think one was needed on an
                          Elegant Punt.

                          Perhaps I "row with perfection". More likely it is because I weigh a
                          lot more than the folks who seem to need a skeg more. I know that my
                          Nymph looks like it has maybe 2-3 feet of boat in the water when my
                          daughter is on board alone. A skeg doesn't help all that much in her
                          case because the skeg is mostly out of the water unless she moves way
                          aft, then the bow is way up in the air catching the breeze.

                          In any case I think that the three strips on the bottom of the EP
                          should give adequate directional stability for most folks. But I
                          have only rowed an EP once and then only for a few minutes.

                          Pete
                        • proaconstrictor
                          I guess I put my foot in that one. I like the skeg I have on mine, and figure it has less resistance than the strips. I have to add some strips on the bottom
                          Message 12 of 17 , Jul 15 8:25 AM
                            I guess I put my foot in that one.

                            I like the skeg I have on mine, and figure it has less resistance
                            than the strips.

                            I have to add some strips on the bottom of my cat hull, so that it
                            will grip a little better when I initiate a turn, and be less twitchy
                            generally. I am loath to add wood strips, because I would have to
                            fasten them, and this late in the game don't have sufficient access
                            to inside to be sure I would get all the holes well enogh closed.
                            What I think I may do is make a pattern, and do that thing plasters
                            do to when they need to apply a cornice etc... I will whipe on the
                            keel in a series of passes, and when it has hardened, I will glass
                            it. That way it should prottect the boat against grounding also, and
                            it won't become a soggy mess when half worn off, as it might if it
                            were of wood.


                            --- In bolger@y..., "dbaldnz" <oink@p...> wrote:
                            > I'm not that overweight proa :)
                            > But
                          • rnlocnil
                            I should think it might be easier to just epoxy on the strips, with a bunch of weight to hole them in place. You could use several thin wood strips to build
                            Message 13 of 17 , Jul 15 6:16 PM
                              I should think it might be easier to just epoxy on the strips, with a
                              bunch of weight to hole them in place. You could use several thin wood
                              strips to build them up if you wanted to, in which case only the last
                              layer would be wet.

                              I have found, on the Nymph, that it is pretty helpful to have a
                              sufficient skeg, at least when my s.o. rows. Greatly increases the
                              time it takes to veer off course when you raise the oars. Ours was
                              slightly smaller than shown on plans at first, but was inadequate.
                              Added a piece to make it slightly larger than plans, which made it
                              much nicer. I have a feeling that Bolger or Payson messed with it
                              until it was just right before BOlger drew the final plans. Keep
                              mentioning the Nymph, I've got to get psyched to fix it!
                              --- In bolger@y..., "proaconstrictor" <proaconstrictor@y...> wrote:
                              snip
                              > generally. I am loath to add wood strips, because I would have to
                              > fasten them, and this late in the game don't have sufficient access
                              > to inside to be sure I would get all the holes well enogh closed.
                              > What I think I may do is make a pattern, and do that thing plasters
                              > do to when they need to apply a cornice etc... I will whipe on the
                              > keel in a series of passes, and when it has hardened, I will glass
                              > it. That way it should prottect the boat against grounding also,
                              and
                              > it won't become a soggy mess when half worn off, as it might if it
                              > were of wood.
                              >
                              >
                              > --- In bolger@y..., "dbaldnz" <oink@p...> wrote:
                              > > I'm not that overweight proa :)
                              > > But
                            • David Ryan
                              I used only thickened epoxy to fasten the skeg to my Gull and I have a feeling that s far stronger than anything setting a few screws through 1/4 plywood
                              Message 14 of 17 , Jul 15 7:20 PM
                                I used only thickened epoxy to fasten the skeg to my Gull and I have
                                a feeling that's far stronger than anything setting a few screws
                                through 1/4" plywood might add.

                                As earlier posted, scribing and cutting the skeg piece to the bottom
                                curve was far easier than I thought it would be. The fit was so
                                close, I just buttered up the skeg and set it in place. I formed the
                                epoxy that gooped out into a fillet. I did this after the hull was
                                glassed.

                                After my experiences with the teal and LS, I would not put glass over
                                a skeg or shoe again. Dragging a boat across sand seems to be about
                                the best way to take the glass off the shoe. Once you get a small
                                hole in the glass, the water gets in and takes care of delaminating
                                the rest.

                                YIBB,

                                David


                                >I should think it might be easier to just epoxy on the strips, with a
                                >bunch of weight to hole them in place. You could use several thin wood
                                >strips to build them up if you wanted to, in which case only the last
                                >layer would be wet.
                                >
                                >I have found, on the Nymph, that it is pretty helpful to have a
                                >sufficient skeg, at least when my s.o. rows. Greatly increases the
                                >time it takes to veer off course when you raise the oars. Ours was
                                >slightly smaller than shown on plans at first, but was inadequate.
                                >Added a piece to make it slightly larger than plans, which made it
                                >much nicer. I have a feeling that Bolger or Payson messed with it
                                >until it was just right before BOlger drew the final plans. Keep
                                >mentioning the Nymph, I've got to get psyched to fix it!
                                >--- In bolger@y..., "proaconstrictor" <proaconstrictor@y...> wrote:
                                >snip
                                >> generally. I am loath to add wood strips, because I would have to
                                >> fasten them, and this late in the game don't have sufficient access
                                >> to inside to be sure I would get all the holes well enogh closed.
                                >> What I think I may do is make a pattern, and do that thing plasters
                                >> do to when they need to apply a cornice etc... I will whipe on the
                                >> keel in a series of passes, and when it has hardened, I will glass
                                >> it. That way it should prottect the boat against grounding also,
                                >and
                                >> it won't become a soggy mess when half worn off, as it might if it
                                >> were of wood.
                                >>
                                >>
                                >> --- In bolger@y..., "dbaldnz" <oink@p...> wrote:
                                >> > I'm not that overweight proa :)
                                >> > But
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >Bolger rules!!!
                                >- no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
                                >- stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred' posts
                                >- add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts and <snip> away
                                >- To order plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester,
                                >MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
                                >- Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                                >- Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
                                >
                                >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


                                C.E.P.
                                415 W.46th Street
                                New York, New York 10036
                                http://www.crumblingempire.com
                                Mobile (646) 325-8325
                                Office (212) 247-0296
                              • lulalake_1999
                                I would not put glass over a skeg or shoe again. Dragging a boat across sand seems to be about the best way to take the glass off the shoe. Once you get a
                                Message 15 of 17 , Jul 16 6:10 AM
                                  "I would not put glass over a skeg or shoe again. Dragging a boat
                                  across sand seems to be about the best way to take the glass off the
                                  shoe. Once you get a small hole in the glass, the water gets in and
                                  takes care of delaminating the rest."

                                  Might be good to consider a couple of UHMW strips along the bottom of
                                  the skegs.



                                  --- In bolger@y..., David Ryan <david@c...> wrote:
                                  > I used only thickened epoxy to fasten the skeg to my Gull and I
                                  have
                                  > a feeling that's far stronger than anything setting a few screws
                                  > through 1/4" plywood might add.
                                  >
                                  > As earlier posted, scribing and cutting the skeg piece to the
                                  bottom
                                  > curve was far easier than I thought it would be. The fit was so
                                  > close, I just buttered up the skeg and set it in place. I formed
                                  the
                                  > epoxy that gooped out into a fillet. I did this after the hull was
                                  > glassed.
                                  >
                                  > After my experiences with the teal and LS, I would not put glass
                                  over
                                  > a skeg or shoe again. Dragging a boat across sand seems to be about
                                  > the best way to take the glass off the shoe. Once you get a small
                                  > hole in the glass, the water gets in and takes care of delaminating
                                  > the rest.
                                  >
                                  > YIBB,
                                  >
                                  > David
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > >I should think it might be easier to just epoxy on the strips,
                                  with a
                                  > >bunch of weight to hole them in place. You could use several thin
                                  wood
                                  > >strips to build them up if you wanted to, in which case only the
                                  last
                                  > >layer would be wet.
                                  > >
                                  > >I have found, on the Nymph, that it is pretty helpful to have a
                                  > >sufficient skeg, at least when my s.o. rows. Greatly increases the
                                  > >time it takes to veer off course when you raise the oars. Ours was
                                  > >slightly smaller than shown on plans at first, but was inadequate.
                                  > >Added a piece to make it slightly larger than plans, which made it
                                  > >much nicer. I have a feeling that Bolger or Payson messed with it
                                  > >until it was just right before BOlger drew the final plans. Keep
                                  > >mentioning the Nymph, I've got to get psyched to fix it!
                                  > >--- In bolger@y..., "proaconstrictor" <proaconstrictor@y...> wrote:
                                  > >snip
                                  > >> generally. I am loath to add wood strips, because I would have
                                  to
                                  > >> fasten them, and this late in the game don't have sufficient
                                  access
                                  > >> to inside to be sure I would get all the holes well enogh
                                  closed.
                                  > >> What I think I may do is make a pattern, and do that thing
                                  plasters
                                  > >> do to when they need to apply a cornice etc... I will whipe on
                                  the
                                  > >> keel in a series of passes, and when it has hardened, I will
                                  glass
                                  > >> it. That way it should prottect the boat against grounding
                                  also,
                                  > >and
                                  > >> it won't become a soggy mess when half worn off, as it might if
                                  it
                                  > >> were of wood.
                                  > >>
                                  > >>
                                  > >> --- In bolger@y..., "dbaldnz" <oink@p...> wrote:
                                  > >> > I'm not that overweight proa :)
                                  > >> > But
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >Bolger rules!!!
                                  > >- no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
                                  > >- stay on topic, stay on thread, punctuate, no 'Ed, thanks, Fred'
                                  posts
                                  > >- add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts and
                                  <snip> away
                                  > >- To order plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester,
                                  > >MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
                                  > >- Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@y...
                                  > >- Open discussion: bolger_coffee_lounge-subscribe@y...
                                  > >
                                  > >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                                  http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > C.E.P.
                                  > 415 W.46th Street
                                  > New York, New York 10036
                                  > http://www.crumblingempire.com
                                  > Mobile (646) 325-8325
                                  > Office (212) 247-0296
                                • proaconstrictor
                                  ... a ... wood ... last ... I appreciate the thought, but don t think it is true in my case. Apart from the cost and mixing, it is always easier to cove
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Jul 16 9:56 AM
                                    --- In bolger@y..., "rnlocnil" <lincolnr@m...> wrote:
                                    > I should think it might be easier to just epoxy on the strips, with
                                    a
                                    > bunch of weight to hole them in place. You could use several thin
                                    wood
                                    > strips to build them up if you wanted to, in which case only the
                                    last
                                    > layer would be wet.

                                    I appreciate the thought, but don't think it is true in my case.
                                    Apart from the cost and mixing, it is always easier to cove elements
                                    than to build nice wood structures. If you look at some of the
                                    ealier wooden/epoxy boats, they often had bulkheads installed over
                                    lots of wooden bits and pieces to spread the load. Nowadays, we just
                                    fire in a cove, and some glass, and leave it at that, it would be
                                    hard to argue it was easier otherwise, and this is the case here.
                                    Controling mulitple bits of epoxy/greasy wood without fasteners,
                                    isn't as easy as running a cove along the bottom. And, of course, in
                                    my case, the fact remains I only ever want to do it once, so the all-
                                    plastic approach will wear much better.
                                  • proaconstrictor
                                    ... have ... Been there done that, but I won t be able to attach, cleats to the bottom of my boat without some temporary fasteners, unless as has been
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Jul 16 10:10 AM
                                      --- In bolger@y..., David Ryan <david@c...> wrote:
                                      > I used only thickened epoxy to fasten the skeg to my Gull and I
                                      have
                                      > a feeling that's far stronger than anything setting a few screws
                                      > through 1/4" plywood might add.

                                      Been there done that, but I won't be able to attach, cleats to the
                                      bottom of my boat without some temporary fasteners, unless as has
                                      been suggested I use multiple pieces and weights etc..., which has no
                                      appeal. There is significant curvature, and even if I succeed, I
                                      still have wood there, not something I can ignore for the next 20
                                      years.

                                      >
                                      > As earlier posted, scribing and cutting the skeg piece to the
                                      bottom
                                      > curve was far easier than I thought it would be. The fit was so
                                      > close, I just buttered up the skeg and set it in place. I formed
                                      the
                                      > epoxy that gooped out into a fillet. I did this after the hull was
                                      > glassed.

                                      Right, but that is a solid piece of material that would sit there on
                                      its own without anything. Cleats will not, uless you pre-laminate to
                                      the curve, or cut them out of ply (yuck) or got real lucky with
                                      springback.

                                      >
                                      > After my experiences with the teal and LS, I would not put glass
                                      over
                                      > a skeg or shoe again. Dragging a boat across sand seems to be about
                                      > the best way to take the glass off the shoe. Once you get a small
                                      > hole in the glass, the water gets in and takes care of delaminating
                                      > the rest.

                                      Which is why I won't be using wood. If the glass goes: Make my
                                      day! I am into epoxy and milled fibers. I never expect anything
                                      other than an accident to get into the hull, which is well glassed.
                                      If the whole thing were biodegradeable, then a plain wood element
                                      would be fine: "we will all go together when we go" as Ton Lerer
                                      said. But this will eliminate a maintenance issue for me.

                                      I don't present this alternative as superior, just alternate.
                                      Superior only as circumstances dictate.
                                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.