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[bolger] Re: Dual Weighted Leeboards

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  • Ernie Murphy
    I ve always wondered why they call that thing a leeboard. When I dunk my skiff at the boatramp, I put the board down away from the dock I m tied to, then pick
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 30, 2000
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      I've always wondered why they call that thing a leeboard. When I dunk
      my skiff at the boatramp, I put the board down away from the dock I'm
      tied to, then pick it up when I return later on. I never toutch it
      inbetween. <grin>

      Anyway, the biggest problem with a weighted leeboard IMHO is the weight
      itself... on small skiffs like we build it would have to severly cut
      carrying capacity to overcome just the weight of your own butt. (Mine
      especially)

      If you've ever seen "The Sharpie Book" (and I do recomend it highly)
      you will see some designs in the back that are ballasted, but these are
      25 feet and up big little boats. The ballast is carried inside along
      the centerboard, as this is the tradidional way. I suppose you could
      play with getting this ballast outside, but I see several problems
      beyond the block and tackel needed to raise it.

      Enjoy

      Ernie
    • ed haile
      David I agree with Ernie. A very heavily leaded leeboard reinvents the swing keel. Swing keels are notorious for developing pivot problems. Imagine what would
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 31, 2000
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        David

        I agree with Ernie. A very heavily leaded leeboard reinvents the
        swing keel. Swing keels are notorious for developing pivot problems.
        Imagine what would happen if you lost one of your boards. Automatic
        knockdown. Also, a design that was ballast positive (unsinkable), might
        become ballast negative (sinkable) and need serious rethinking and
        modification. I think of a sharpie as a catamaran. Tremendous hull
        stability between a pair of very hard chines to which one adds water
        tanks or lead just enough to allow, unlike a cat, ultimate recovery.
        Great idea but stay within the guidelines.

        Ed Haile
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