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Re: Hour 40

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  • rnlocnil
    Yes, but does it have any strength when the parts don t have a tight fit? Epoxy is pretty good stuff for filling small gaps (or large ones, if you can afford
    Message 1 of 14 , Jun 2, 2002
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      Yes, but does it have any strength when the parts don't have a tight
      fit? Epoxy is pretty good stuff for filling small gaps (or large ones,
      if you can afford it).
      --- In bolger@y..., <boatbuilding@g...> wrote:
      > >
      > >>Polyurethane glue; snip
    • brucehallman
      ... Whim and not much else. I think the Gorilla Glue swells up by 3 or 4 times, so a pint equals perhaps a quart of thickened epoxy. Also, I feel that
      Message 2 of 14 , Jun 2, 2002
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        --- In bolger@y..., David Ryan <david@c...> wrote:

        > At $7/pint that's $56/gallon -- more than Raka epoxy.
        > Why not use epoxy?

        Whim and not much else. I think the Gorilla Glue swells up by 3 or 4
        times, so a pint equals perhaps a quart of thickened epoxy. Also, I
        feel that dealing with a squeeze bottle, versus mixing up a batch
        from two parts, is a little easier.

        The real reason I switched, was that day last weekend when I was
        working outdoors in the pouring rain, with very wet wood. The glue
        joint I made with epoxy fell apart; disgusted, I ran to the store and
        bought the Gorilla Glue and discovered that it sticks even better
        when things are wet.
      • nettech22407
        I have used gorilla glue as well as epoxy, and PL premium. My experience indicates that the epoxy is the strongest. The PL is is a little sensative to surface
        Message 3 of 14 , Jun 2, 2002
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          I have used gorilla glue as well as epoxy, and PL premium.

          My experience indicates that the epoxy is the strongest. The PL is
          is a little sensative to surface prep, it doesn't seem to like laytex
          paint. I found that the GG used in loose joints is shock sensative.
          I found this out the hard way, my 15' skiff slid off of the saw
          horses I had it on. Where I only used GG to join the frames and
          there were gaps, the shock of the fall knocked the frames off of the
          plywood sides. Where I used 3M 5200 there was no problems. I had
          used 5200 on the port side and GG on the starboard side. The GG
          joint separated without damaging the underlying wood.

          From working with all the above glues, I have come to like 3M 5200.
          The regular version sets in 4 hours and takes up to 4 days to fully
          cure. The fast cure 5200 sets in 45 minutes and cures in one day.
          It will bridge gaps of up to 3/8" or 9mm. When it cures it does not
          foam. When cured, it has the consistancy of the rubber used in
          skateboard wheels. On bare wood, removing it requires taking away
          some of the underlying wood. The downside to this glue, is you
          should clean up right away, it is a bear to sand off drips.


          >snip
          >--- In bolger@y..., "brucehallman" <brucehallman@y...> wrote:
          > --- In bolger@y..., teakdeck@a... wrote:
          > > Gorilla glue.
          >
          > http://www.gorillaglue.com/
          >
          > Polyurethane glue; and it is new to me. Someone here recommended
          it
          > a few weeks back. I am using a 'generic' version of the brand name
          > stuff, $7 a pint. I like that it has GREAT adhesion, it is
          *really*
          > snip
        • dbaldnz
          Sorry Bruce, but I cannot understand your logic at all on this one. All epoxy labels say the wood must be dry. Gorilla labels say the joint should be damp.
          Message 4 of 14 , Jun 3, 2002
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            Sorry Bruce, but I cannot understand your logic at all on this one.
            All epoxy labels say the wood must be dry.
            Gorilla labels say the joint should be damp.
            What would you expect?
            DonB

            --- In bolger@y..., "brucehallman" <brucehallman@y...> wrote:
            > --- In bolger@y..., David Ryan <david@c...> wrote:
            >
            > The real reason I switched, was that day last weekend when I was
            > working outdoors in the pouring rain, with very wet wood. The glue
            > joint I made with epoxy fell apart; disgusted, I ran to the store
            and
            > bought the Gorilla Glue and discovered that it sticks even better
            > when things are wet.
          • donm172001
            ... A great resource for learning how to lay out and spile strakes is The Clinker Plywood Boatbuilding Manual by Iain Oughtred. It also has a wealth of
            Message 5 of 14 , Jun 6, 2002
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              --- In bolger@y..., "brucehallman" <brucehallman@y...> wrote:
              > I am still plugging away at my lapstrake learning experiment with
              > Spur II [BWAOM]. My strakes are very far from 'correct', but never
              > the less, I think the boat will float. I learned enough about how
              > strakes fall on frames that "next time" I bet I can make proper
              > strakes [perhaps]. The boat is extremely light weight.
              >
              > I think that using 1/8" plywood to "plank" a boat is quicker than
              > using 1/4" redwood strips. Gorilla glue is excellent stuff.
              >
              > http://www.hallman.org/bolger/spur/hour40/


              A great resource for learning how to lay out and spile strakes is
              "The Clinker Plywood Boatbuilding Manual" by Iain Oughtred. It also
              has a wealth of information on building lapstrake plywood boats. It
              is available at Amazon and the WoodenBoat Store.
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