Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [bolger] OSB

Expand Messages
  • Mark Albanese
    ... Hiya, Bruce. Yes, sorta. Both are wood detritus fixed in glue. Particleboard is the other name. They sell it around here for underlayment, and I think it
    Message 1 of 14 , Jun 1, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      > The "Chipboard" was what I had in mind. What is "fiberboard"? is it a
      > smooth faced type of OSB?

      Hiya, Bruce.

      Yes, sorta. Both are wood detritus fixed in glue. Particleboard is the other name. They
      sell it around here for underlayment, and I think it is the same as used for inexpensive
      furniture, sometimes plain, or with a wood grained laminate. It's pretty easily flaked or shattered.

      > I thought it would be heavy, but, it wouldn't have any voids. If you
      > sheathed the outside in fiberglass would it be that hard to finish?? the
      > inside might be a different matter. A thin coat of bondo comes to mind, but
      > that would only increase the weight. :(

      Both have to be a lot thicker and heavier than ply to have the same strength. By the
      time you've done all this fixing, any savings are quite out the window.

      I've recently done some boil and cold water soak tests on some Philippine that's not
      officially rated exterior, with encouraging results for intermittently used small craft.
      The sheets look good both sides and I cannot find a single void. If you're really on a
      budget, then I think that's the way to go.

      On the other hand, real 6mm marine can be had starting at $42.50 / sheet. You'd spend a
      like amount ( or more ) if you feel the need to epoxy it all over. So by using crap,
      you'll only save at most $50 on a two sheet boat.

      I've looked at that $5 a sheet stuff longingly myself. Notice nobody responded in the
      affirmative yet to your original question.

      Sorry,
      Mark
    • Richard Spelling
      Well, particle board , the smooth glued up sawdust variety, is NOT waterproof, as evidenced by the 3/4 board on my porch now swelled to 1 1/8 and slowly
      Message 2 of 14 , Jun 2, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        Well, "particle board", the smooth glued up sawdust variety, is NOT
        waterproof, as evidenced by the 3/4" board on my porch now swelled to 1 1/8"
        and slowly turning back to sawdust in the rain.

        "waferboard", boards made up from largish chips, may be relatively
        waterproof. The forms for the CLC are laying on the ground in the rain so I
        don't have to walk in the mud. They seem to be holding up OK.

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Mark Albanese" <marka@...>
        To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, June 02, 2002 1:45 AM
        Subject: Re: [bolger] OSB


        |
        |
        | > The "Chipboard" was what I had in mind. What is "fiberboard"? is it a
        | > smooth faced type of OSB?
        |
        | Hiya, Bruce.
        |
        | Yes, sorta. Both are wood detritus fixed in glue. Particleboard is the
        other name. They
        | sell it around here for underlayment, and I think it is the same as used
        for inexpensive
        | furniture, sometimes plain, or with a wood grained laminate. It's pretty
        easily flaked or shattered.
        |
        | > I thought it would be heavy, but, it wouldn't have any voids. If you
        | > sheathed the outside in fiberglass would it be that hard to finish??
        the
        | > inside might be a different matter. A thin coat of bondo comes to mind,
        but
        | > that would only increase the weight. :(
        |
        | Both have to be a lot thicker and heavier than ply to have the same
        strength. By the
        | time you've done all this fixing, any savings are quite out the window.
        |
        | I've recently done some boil and cold water soak tests on some Philippine
        that's not
        | officially rated exterior, with encouraging results for intermittently
        used small craft.
        | The sheets look good both sides and I cannot find a single void. If you're
        really on a
        | budget, then I think that's the way to go.
        |
        | On the other hand, real 6mm marine can be had starting at $42.50 / sheet.
        You'd spend a
        | like amount ( or more ) if you feel the need to epoxy it all over. So by
        using crap,
        | you'll only save at most $50 on a two sheet boat.
        |
        | I've looked at that $5 a sheet stuff longingly myself. Notice nobody
        responded in the
        | affirmative yet to your original question.
        |
        | Sorry,
        | Mark
        |
        |
        | Bolger rules!!!
        | - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
        | - pls take "personals" off-list, stay on topic, and punctuate
        | - add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts, snip all you like
        | - To order plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA,
        01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
        | - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        |
        | Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        |
        |
        |
      • sacalman
        Hello all, I work in the building industry(Although I don t pound nails) in California and at this point we make all of our houses out of OSB here. There are
        Message 3 of 14 , Jun 2, 2002
        • 0 Attachment
          Hello all,

          I work in the building industry(Although I don't pound nails) in
          California and at this point we make all of our houses out of OSB
          here. There are huge amounts of this stuff lying around our job sites
          and I tend to pick up the larger cutoffs and make things out of them.

          This is tough stuff and can take the weather(well, Southern
          California weather..;)) quite well. I have also picked up pieces that
          were repeatedly run over by backhoes, trucks, Pettibones, ETC. and
          never seen any significant delamination.

          Three things I do know, you cannot get a smooth finish, there is
          significant checking when cutting, and deck screws will pull right
          through it when enough force is applied. I solved the finish issue by
          laminating door skins or Formica to the faces. So far I have built
          several pieces of outside furniture and shelves for my garage out of
          free materials.

          I would suggest that before you build a boat out of it that you put a
          piece in your dishwasher for a month and see if it delaminates.

          Good Luck!

          Scott Calman


          --- In bolger@y..., "Bruce C. Anderson" <bcanderson@c...> wrote:
          > Howdy
          >
          > Has anyone used OSB for building a stitch and tape boat?
          >
          > See Ya
          >
          > Have Fun
          >
          > Bruce
          >
          > http://www.cableone.net/bcanderson/
        • timothyennuinet
          I can believe that OSB is strong.. when backed by a strong material (like the ground, or rebar/steel framing). But there is NO WAY I would build anything
          Message 4 of 14 , Jun 2, 2002
          • 0 Attachment
            I can believe that OSB is strong.. when backed by a strong material
            (like the ground, or rebar/steel framing). But there is NO WAY I would
            build anything except a small boat intended for intermittent use from it.

            The strength of wood, the real strength, is from the continuous fiber
            strands that lie throughout. In plywood, this is maximized by laying
            lam layers at cross grain. IN OSB, the strain is being held by the
            GLUE, which is passing strain through the wood fiber bits within it.

            I would bet loads of cash that OSB does not stand up under repeated
            shock loading, like pounding in a rough seaway or being tossed against
            a pier a few times during a storm.

            Before using this for any boat project larger than a messabout, I
            would seriously consider looking for real test data done under the
            conditions that boats experience in the water when being driven. In
            fact, contact this association mentioned about it. They may have data.
            If they can assure me that the wood wont disintegrate when I bump into
            that steel yacht in the anchorage, Ill think about it.

            In the meantime, I'll wait for my next check to buy some BS1088 Okume.
            Yes, it costs twice or more as other woods, but darn.. it has a long
            record of success, and loads of test data to back it up. Does that
            mean I have to wait longer to get in the water? Yep. But with my wife
            in the boat, no other way I'd do it. :)

            --Timothy
          • proaconstrictor
            The half inch stuff is an inch or more after a while in the rain. If you sheath it with epoxy, it would probably hold up pretty well, but so would issues of
            Message 5 of 14 , Jun 2, 2002
            • 0 Attachment
              The half inch stuff is an inch or more after a while in the rain. If
              you sheath it with epoxy, it would probably hold up pretty well, but
              so would issues of playboy magazine. I think once you throw that
              kind of money and effort at a project, consider all the problems with
              load take-offs, swelling, etc, I would spring for something a little
              better, doesn't generaly have to be 1088, but I can't see any
              argument for OSB.-


              -- In bolger@y..., "sacalman" <sacalman@y...> wrote:
              > Hello all,
              >
              > I work in the building industry(Although I don't pound nails) in
              > California and at this point we make all of our houses out of OSB
              > here. >

              snip

              I would suggest that before you build a boat out of it that you put a
              > piece in your dishwasher for a month and see if it delaminates.

              It's true! it never rains in sothern California.
            • nettech22407
              OSB is to marine plywood as Scrapple is to tenderloin. What OSB and scrapple have in commen is that both are made from floor sweepings.
              Message 6 of 14 , Jun 3, 2002
              • 0 Attachment
                OSB is to marine plywood as Scrapple is to tenderloin.

                What OSB and scrapple have in commen is that both are made from floor
                sweepings.
              • Nickerson, Bruce
                I will be sure never to scramble any OSB with my morning eggs. ... From: nettech22407 [mailto:micwal_va@hotmail.com] Sent: Monday, June 03, 2002 9:50 PM To:
                Message 7 of 14 , Jun 4, 2002
                • 0 Attachment
                  I will be sure never to scramble any OSB with my morning eggs.

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: nettech22407 [mailto:micwal_va@...]
                  Sent: Monday, June 03, 2002 9:50 PM
                  To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [bolger] Re: OSB


                  OSB is to marine plywood as Scrapple is to tenderloin.

                  What OSB and scrapple have in commen is that both are made from floor
                  sweepings.


                  Bolger rules!!!
                  - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
                  - pls take "personals" off-list, stay on topic, and punctuate
                  - add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts, snip all you like
                  - To order plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA,
                  01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
                  - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service
                  <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/> .




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • steelcb
                  Without a doubt, oriented strand board (OSB) made of large flakes or wafers of wood thus the nickname waferboard is very different from particleboard and
                  Message 8 of 14 , Jun 9, 2002
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Without a doubt, oriented strand board (OSB) made of large flakes or
                    "wafers" of wood thus the nickname "waferboard" is very different
                    from particleboard and is strong and made using exterior glues. I
                    considered building a small boat with it myself because of the low
                    cost (I'm pretty cheap when it comes to paying for materials).

                    In pursuit of this, I called Dynamite Payson's number and his
                    delightful wife, who said he was "..working on somebody's boat," got
                    him to the phone for me.

                    His response to my question "Could I build a boat of OSB?" was
                    simply, "Yes, if you want to sink."

                    Tom Pannell

                    --- In bolger@y..., "Bruce C. Anderson" <bcanderson@c...> wrote:
                    > Howdy
                    >
                    > Has anyone used OSB for building a stitch and tape boat?
                    >
                    > See Ya
                    >
                    > Have Fun
                    >
                    > Bruce
                    >
                    > http://www.cableone.net/bcanderson/
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.