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Re: tiburon

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  • wadeleftwich
    ... One day some years ago I was fishing out of Pensacola in a 28-foot sportfisherman, and one of the guys boated a small mako that wasn t quite dead yet. We
    Message 1 of 16 , Apr 2 7:35 AM
      --- In bolger@y..., David Ryan <david@c...> wrote:
      > Viva la Panga! Not only do they use them in B.C, but also throughout
      > the rest of Mexico. Friends of mine in Puerto Angel go out as far at
      > 30 miles for tibaron (shark). They asked me if I'd like to join them
      > and I said I wasn't feeling well ;-)
      >

      One day some years ago I was fishing out of Pensacola in a 28-foot sportfisherman, and one of the guys boated a small mako that wasn't quite dead yet. We all sat on the bridge while the shark ate a couple of rods, and the gaff, and a good chunk of the fighting chair. If we had been in a skiff we would have had to jump in the water and let the shark have the boat.

      Wade Leftwich
      Ithaca, NY
    • Hal Lynch
      My garage finally warmed up enough to make sawdust. I am making the leeboard for my Teal by gluing two 1/4 pieces of plywood together. What do you folks do to
      Message 2 of 16 , Apr 2 8:44 AM
        My garage finally warmed up enough to make sawdust.

        I am making the leeboard for my Teal by gluing two 1/4 pieces
        of plywood together. What do you folks do to insure a good
        close fit of the two halves? Do you use weight (how much?),
        clamps, or both?

        hal
      • rlspell2000
        Cut them oversized, trim after glued together. For 1/4 sqeeze them between a couple pieces of MDF or something. Put wax paper down so any epoxy that sqeezes
        Message 3 of 16 , Apr 2 9:07 AM
          Cut them oversized, trim after glued together. For 1/4" sqeeze them
          between a couple pieces of MDF or something. Put wax paper down so
          any epoxy that sqeezes out doesn't glue your leeboard to the other
          boards.

          Use two or three cinder blocks for weight, or equivelent.


          --- In bolger@y..., Hal Lynch <hal@c...> wrote:
          > My garage finally warmed up enough to make sawdust.
          >
          > I am making the leeboard for my Teal by gluing two 1/4 pieces
          > of plywood together. What do you folks do to insure a good
          > close fit of the two halves? Do you use weight (how much?),
          > clamps, or both?
          >
          > hal
        • GarthAB
          What do you folks do to insure a good ... Hal -- Richard has a good idea about cutting oversized and trimming after glue-up. Also to consider -- maybe make
          Message 4 of 16 , Apr 2 10:03 AM
            What do you folks do to insure a good
            > close fit of the two halves? Do you use weight (how much?),
            > clamps, or both?
            >
            > hal


            Hal --

            Richard has a good idea about cutting oversized and trimming after
            glue-up.

            Also to consider -- maybe make this board 3/4" thick. I don't know
            about the forces a Teal generates, but the 1/2" bilgeboard prescribed
            by Bolger/Payson for the Windsprint failed me in a bit of a swell.
            The boat slid sideways down a wave face, and I heard a CRACK. The
            board snapped off right across the line where it exited the bottom of
            the case.

            For glue-up -- try slathering the faces with glue, then tapping a few
            small nails through the pieces to keep them from sliding around, and
            then weighting liberally with cinder blocks, big rocks, etc. Put wax
            paper under the whole assembly so it doesn't glue to the floor.

            The sliding around thing is weird -- you'd think gravity would be
            more or less equal all around and your pieces would stay put, but
            glued up wood finds a downhill where you'd never dream there is one,
            and away it goes.

            All best,
            Garth
          • rlspell2000
            Make sure the surface grain of the ply is running longways too. A light layer of glass will help also, if you are sticking with 1/2 ... prescribed ... of ...
            Message 5 of 16 , Apr 2 10:10 AM
              Make sure the surface grain of the ply is running longways too. A
              light layer of glass will help also, if you are sticking with 1/2"
              --- In bolger@y..., "GarthAB" <garth@b...> wrote:
              > What do you folks do to insure a good
              > > close fit of the two halves? Do you use weight (how much?),
              > > clamps, or both?
              > >
              > > hal
              >
              >
              > Hal --
              >
              > Richard has a good idea about cutting oversized and trimming after
              > glue-up.
              >
              > Also to consider -- maybe make this board 3/4" thick. I don't know
              > about the forces a Teal generates, but the 1/2" bilgeboard
              prescribed
              > by Bolger/Payson for the Windsprint failed me in a bit of a swell.
              > The boat slid sideways down a wave face, and I heard a CRACK. The
              > board snapped off right across the line where it exited the bottom
              of
              > the case.
              >
              > For glue-up -- try slathering the faces with glue, then tapping a
              few
              > small nails through the pieces to keep them from sliding around,
              and
              > then weighting liberally with cinder blocks, big rocks, etc. Put
              wax
              > paper under the whole assembly so it doesn't glue to the floor.
              >
              > The sliding around thing is weird -- you'd think gravity would be
              > more or less equal all around and your pieces would stay put, but
              > glued up wood finds a downhill where you'd never dream there is
              one,
              > and away it goes.
              >
              > All best,
              > Garth
            • rnlocnil
              see below. ... This depends on the thickness of the surface plies. For luan, with the incredibly thin faces it has, it s probably better to put the surface
              Message 6 of 16 , Apr 2 10:31 AM
                see below.
                --- In bolger@y..., "rlspell2000" <richard@s...> wrote:
                > Make sure the surface grain of the ply is running longways too. A
                > light layer of glass will help also, if you are sticking with 1/2"

                This depends on the thickness of the surface plies. For luan, with the
                incredibly thin faces it has, it's probably better to put the surface
                plies crosswise and use the strength of the much thicker center.
                Generally, as you use more layers of plywood glued together, thickness
                of the surface plies becomes more and more critical. If a kind of
                plywood has optimised surface ply thickness such that strength is
                equal in either direction, then it will be half as thick as it should
                be if you glue two pieces together. Same goes for stiffness, tho in
                that case optimal thickness of face ply will be less.
                > --- In bolger@y..., "GarthAB" <garth@b...> wrote:
                > > What do you folks do to insure a good
                > > > close fit of the two halves? Do you use weight (how much?),
                > > > clamps, or both?
                > > >
                > > > hal
                > >
                > >
                If you have enough thickened epoxy and a good fit, just a little
                weight to keep the halves in place is ok. If you are using some other
                kind of glue you will want to sandwich it between two flat surfaces
                and use LOTS of weight. If you have a vacuum pump, throw it in a
                garbage bag with a length of paper towels, seal with MoreTite, thick
                caulk, or similar, and pump the air out for up to 15lbs/in^2 clamping,
                which is certainly more than enough for most glues. That's what I did,
                but I didn't get it into the bag fast enough.
                > > Hal --
                snip
                > >
                > > Also to consider -- maybe make this board 3/4" thick. I don't know
                > > about the forces a Teal generates, but the 1/2" bilgeboard
                > prescribed
                > > by Bolger/Payson for the Windsprint failed me in a bit of a swell.
                Compare length of board on Windspint and Teal. Stress will go
                approximately with square of free length of board and with square of
                speed of boat. I suspect proper orientation of faces will be
                sufficient, but I don't know that.
                snip
                > > For glue-up -- try slathering the faces with glue, then tapping a
                > few
                > > small nails through the pieces to keep them from sliding around,
                snip
                > > The sliding around thing is weird -- you'd think gravity would be
                > > more or less equal all around and your pieces would stay put, but
                > > glued up wood finds a downhill where you'd never dream there is
                > one,
                > > and away it goes.
                > >
                > > All best,
                > > Garth
                I've seen this too. Maybe try tape to avoid nail holes? Some kind of
                double ended short tack for same purpose?
              • rnlocnil
                Light layer of glass may not help. I suspect that the elastic modulus of woven glass/epoxy is such that the wood does almost all the work if stressed along the
                Message 7 of 16 , Apr 2 10:35 AM
                  Light layer of glass may not help. I suspect that the elastic modulus
                  of woven glass/epoxy is such that the wood does almost all the work
                  if stressed along the grain. Unidirectional glass might be different.
                  However, I haven't done any tests. As you increase the thickness of
                  woven glass, it will increase the thickness of the board and
                  eventually will work harder.
                  --- In bolger@y..., "rlspell2000" <richard@s...> wrote:
                  > Make sure the surface grain of the ply is running longways too. A
                  > light layer of glass will help also, if you are sticking with 1/2"
                  snip
                • David Ryan
                  ... A couple of things: 1) You can make the board out of a single sheet of 1/4, 2 layers of 1/4, or a single sheet of 1/2. All will be stronger than the tines.
                  Message 8 of 16 , Apr 2 1:52 PM
                    >My garage finally warmed up enough to make sawdust.
                    >
                    >I am making the leeboard for my Teal by gluing two 1/4 pieces
                    >of plywood together. What do you folks do to insure a good
                    >close fit of the two halves? Do you use weight (how much?),
                    >clamps, or both?
                    >

                    A couple of things:

                    1) You can make the board out of a single sheet of 1/4, 2 layers of
                    1/4, or a single sheet of 1/2. All will be stronger than the tines. I
                    know because I've done all three and and the board rip off the tines
                    or just plain breaking the tines by driving the boat hard. (Picture
                    two full grown man hiked out on the weather rail of a Teal while
                    using a Sunfish rig in about 20+ knots of wind) If you use fir,
                    covering with epoxy and glass will make your paint job last a lot
                    longer, but isn't necessary for strength. Luan doens't seem to check
                    nearly as bad as fir. Don't know if it has a down side.

                    2) Between breaking, losing, or running over with my car, I've
                    laminated about a half dozen rudders or board and the only thing
                    that's worked for me is to use LOTS of thickened epoxy and screw the
                    two sides together. All attempts at clamping/weighting have wasted
                    my time, epoxy and patience. When I build the daggerboard for my
                    Light Scooner I ran a line of sheet rock screws all around the
                    perimeter and put a bunch in the middle for good measure.

                    3) As suggested both some others, glue first, cut second seems to be
                    a good idea. Much easier to square up to rectangular boards.

                    4) The Teal is an awesome little boat. Whatever you end up doing
                    you'll love your Teal!

                    YIBB,

                    David

                    C.E.P.
                    415 W.46th Street
                    New York, New York 10036
                    http://www.crumblingempire.com
                    (212) 247-0296
                  • thomas dalzell
                    You can vaccum bag it, which might seem like overkill with a simple part like this, but with the right yellow glue, you would only need an hour of running to
                    Message 9 of 16 , Apr 2 7:05 PM
                      You can vaccum bag it, which might seem like overkill
                      with a simple part like this, but with the right
                      yellow glue, you would only need an hour of running to
                      dry it, and you get the perfect bond. If you are
                      epoxying the whole thing anyway it should be fine.
                      Other than that, clamp the edges with epoxy in the
                      joint, and put a few heavy thing in the middle


                      ______________________________________________________________________
                      Find, Connect, Date! http://personals.yahoo.ca
                    • jhkohnen@boat-links.com
                      Not by Bolger, but nice fishing boats nonetheless: http://www.fao.org/DOCREP/003/W7260E/W7260E00.htm ... -- John
                      Message 10 of 16 , Apr 2 9:10 PM
                        Not by Bolger, but nice fishing boats nonetheless:

                        http://www.fao.org/DOCREP/003/W7260E/W7260E00.htm

                        On Mon, 1 Apr 2002 19:16:17 -0500, Wade Leftwich wrote:
                        > Pangas are those 20-foot outboard skiffs you see in Baja California, casting
                        > for roosterfish by the rocks or trolling for marlin out in the bluewater. The
                        > most panga-like Bolger design I know of is the 18-foot Clam Skiff, but pangas
                        > have a shallow vee and a higher bow.
                        >
                        > Is there another Bolger boat that is a bit more along those lines, or someone
                        > else's design that would be suitable for homebuilding by a gringo?
                        >
                        > I live near Lake Ontario, and am also thinking about trailering down to the
                        > Jersey Shore.
                        >
                        > Wade Leftwich
                        > Ithaca, NY

                        --
                        John <jkohnen@...>
                        http://www.boat-links.com/
                        One must have a heart of stone to read the death of Little Nell by
                        Dickens without laughing. <Oscar Wilde>
                      • stephensonhw@aol.com
                        If someone wanted a vee-bottomed alternative to Tennessee (low power requirement, long and narrow), they could have a look at the largest of these designs.
                        Message 11 of 16 , Apr 3 12:37 PM
                          If someone wanted a vee-bottomed alternative to Tennessee (low power
                          requirement, long and narrow), they could have a look at the largest of these
                          designs. It's eighteen inches or so shorter than Tennessee and a little
                          narrower, but instructions are given as to how to increase the beam up to
                          20%. No lofting necessary and complete instructions given for building either
                          in plywood or sawn timber.

                          Howard

                          In a message dated 03-04-02 3:34:22 PM E. Australia Standard Time,
                          jhkohnen@... writes:

                          >
                          > Not by Bolger, but nice fishing boats nonetheless:
                          >
                          > http://www.fao.org/DOCREP/003/W7260E/W7260E00.htm
                          >
                          >

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