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Re: [bolger] Re: Old Trailer

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  • Mark Albanese
    Steve, xxx x xxxxxxxx Your removable tongue would be terrific, since my off the street, winter storage is best at 16 over all. I d like to make the cut on the
    Message 1 of 38 , Apr 1, 2002
      Steve,

      xxx
      x
      xxxxxxxx

      Your removable tongue would be terrific, since my off the
      street, winter storage is best at 16' over all.

      I'd like to make the cut on the lower part of the tongue (
      as above ), but the Y is welded to the top corner of the
      elbow. There are many light boat trailers now that are just
      a little square with a very long and unsupported tongue, so
      I expect it could work to just saw that off; yet I'm
      reluctant to inflict damage on something so nice already.
      Best would be to move the elbow with the welded tongue
      forward and put back on a Y.

      I'm saving your idea for later. The bird refuge I cruise
      opens April 15th, and it's about all I can do right now to
      pull everything together to be there then.

      I'm going to fit some bunks to what there is, as is, for now.
      BTW the trailer is exactly the right size now for one of
      your genial, little Chuggers.

      Thanks,
      Mark

      lewisboats wrote:
      >
      > You might not have to get it welded. If the tube is
      > hollow all the
      > way, see if you can find a pipe of the correct dimensions
      > (small
      > enough to fit snugly inside the main tongue pipe). Then I
      > would cut
      > it right at the Y, leaving the 1" on the coupler part.
      > Then I would
      > insert the pipe into the tongue far enough back to clear
      > the Y, drill
      > and bolt together. Then drill and bolt the coupler to the
      > other end
      > of the pipe. This way, if you want to adjust the length of
      > the
      > tongue, all you have to do is pull the bolt behind the Y
      > and relocate
      > to another hole (s), further down the tongue, as far as
      > the axle.
      > Could be used on longer or shorter boats. A half to 5/8ths
      > bolt has
      > plenty of sheer strength for up to 800-1000 lbs. If going
      > heavier, I
      > would not use bolts, but weld instead.
      > Is the coupler welded to the tongue or just bolted on?
      > Most are
      > bolted but if this one isn't, you could just replace the
      > coupler and
      > bolt it straight to the extention, they aren't very
      > expensive ($20?).
      >
      > BTW, thanks much for the kind words about the site, you
      > and Mikeeeee
      > have me all a blushin'. You see, I tend to use a highly
      > Modified and
      > Detailed K.I.S.S. principal.........., and even SUCCEED
      > sometimes, in
      > spite of myself. I also tend to think the old addage "if
      > it ain't
      > broke, don't fix it" takes All the fun out of things. I
      > also think
      > that artwork boats are beautiful and all, but if I can
      > whip up a boat
      > in a couple of days, have it last a few years, and then
      > get to build
      > another one, I'm a happy man (I get to build another one,
      > whoopeee!!).
      > (to that effect, I use luaun or meranti underlayment
      > ($6.50/sheet)
      > for my own boats, templates and prototypes. I use exterior
      > for
      > everything else).
      >
      > Let me know what you come up with for the trailer, I'm
      > interested.
      >
      > PS: if you go with the adjustable tongue, double nut the
      > bolt with a
      > lockwasher in between.
      >
      > Steve.
    • Mark Albanese
      Thanks for this, Chuck. I expected a four wire, flat harness that went front to back ( hey, let s make our first million again ), but this ll work, especially
      Message 38 of 38 , Apr 9, 2002
        Thanks for this, Chuck.

        I expected a four wire, flat harness that went front to back ( hey, let's make our first
        million again ), but this'll work, especially your alternative scheme.

        Mark

        Chuck Leinweber wrote:

        > I think that is standard. Ground each of the bulbs to the frame of the trailer, then ground the (usually) white wire that goes into the flat plug to the frame also. Alternately, you can run additional wires from each light back to the white wire. You will have to do this if you have a wooden trailer, or if the lights are on a dismountable bar.
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