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RE: [bolger] What is a motorsailer?

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  • Stew Miller
    Maybe it s determined by the size of the fuel tanks :) Stew ... From: porcupinefysh [mailto:porcupine@dmcom.net] Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2002 8:28 PM ...
    Message 1 of 21 , Feb 28, 2002
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      Maybe it's determined by the size of the fuel tanks :)

      Stew


      -----Original Message-----
      From: porcupinefysh [mailto:porcupine@...]
      Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2002 8:28 PM

      David Ryan's post caused me to raise this question:

      --- In bolger@y..., David Ryan <david@c...> wrote:

      > ....As far as a "motorsailer" goes, I think you're right. I also
      think
      > that just about any sailboat over 30' is by definition a
      motorsailer....

      Long ago, somebody (think it was Eric Hiscock, or one Herreshoff or
      another) said that an auxiliary sailboat should have an engine that is
      sized to about one horsepower per ton of displacement. If the engine
      was larger, you had a 50/50 or a motor-sailer. Nowadays just about
      every sailboat designed has an engine of at least two horsepower per
      ton displacement, and most have even more. Obviously, engine size no
      longer marks a boat a motorsailer. So what distinguishes a
      motorsailer? Is it a pilothouse, a small rig, or some other set of
      features? Is it simply that the designer or (more likely in most
      cases) the marketing department decides to call a boat a motorsailer,
      and thus it is so? Does anyone want to venture a guess?

      porky
    • lewisboats
      the reference to built in was in the order of an engine block and shaft type of arrangement. Not ANY kind of outboard. The engine would have to be mounted
      Message 2 of 21 , Mar 1 2:57 AM
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        the reference to 'built in' was in the order of an engine block and
        shaft type of arrangement. Not ANY kind of outboard. The engine would
        have to be mounted 'inboard' and shafted to a prop. Sorry for any
        confusion. I'm thinking of a V 6 or 8 (fuel optional) mounted in a
        motor housing, complete with shaft and propeller(sp?) extending
        through the hull and not removeable.

        --- In bolger@y..., "rlspell2000" <richard@s...> wrote:
        > So, any sailboat with a "built in" motor is a motorsailer?
        > Define "built-in".
        >
        > Obviosly, a motor hanging off the back on a dropping bracket is
        > not "built in".
        >
        > Would a free flooding motor well count? Them most big Bolger boat
        > are "motor sailors"...
        >
        > --- In bolger@y..., "lewisboats" <numbaoneman@b...> wrote:
        > > Just a little mouse's opinion, but I think I would call any boat
        > with
        > > a built in motor as a motorsailer, and any boat with sails and a
        > > small outboard as a sailboat with a small outboard. Sailboat
        with
        > > big outboard I would call 'confused' (working cargo sailers
        exempt:
        > > They do whats nescessary to make the money, so anything goes)
        > >
        > > --- In bolger@y..., "porcupinefysh" <porcupine@d...> wrote:
        > > > David Ryan's post caused me to raise this question:
        > > >
        > > > --- In bolger@y..., David Ryan <david@c...> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > > ....As far as a "motorsailer" goes, I think you're right. I
        > also
        > > > think
        > > > > that just about any sailboat over 30' is by definition a
        > > > motorsailer....
        > > >
        > > > Long ago, somebody (think it was Eric Hiscock, or one
        Herreshoff
        > or
        > > > another) said that an auxiliary sailboat should have an engine
        > that
        > > is
        > > > sized to about one horsepower per ton of displacement. If the
        > > engine
        > > > was larger, you had a 50/50 or a motor-sailer. Nowadays just
        > about
        > > > every sailboat designed has an engine of at least two
        horsepower
        > > per
        > > > ton displacement, and most have even more. Obviously, engine
        size
        > > no
        > > > longer marks a boat a motorsailer. So what distinguishes a
        > > > motorsailer? Is it a pilothouse, a small rig, or some other set
        > of
        > > > features? Is it simply that the designer or (more likely in
        most
        > > > cases) the marketing department decides to call a boat a
        > > motorsailer,
        > > > and thus it is so? Does anyone want to venture a guess?
        > > >
        > > > porky
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