Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Hot dipped zinc

Expand Messages
  • David Allen
    anyone familiar with the hot dip process? in particular, can I take old anodes, melt them down and dip iron parts for use at sea? da
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 2, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      anyone familiar with the hot dip process? in particular, can I take old
      anodes, melt them down and dip iron parts for use at sea?

      da
    • Chuck Leinweber
      David: I know just enough to be dangerous. That never stopped me from shooting off my mouth before though. I think you would have to acid dip the metal to
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 2, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        David:

        I know just enough to be dangerous. That never stopped me from shooting off my mouth before though. I think you would have to acid dip the metal to remove any oil/scale/rust then apply the proper flux before dipping.

        Chuck

        anyone familiar with the hot dip process? in particular, can I take old
        anodes, melt them down and dip iron parts for use at sea?

        da






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • vexatious2001
        ... shooting off my mouth before though. I think you would have to acid dip the metal to remove any oil/scale/rust then apply the proper flux before dipping.
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 2, 2002
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In bolger@y..., "Chuck Leinweber" <chuck@d...> wrote:
          > David:
          >
          > I know just enough to be dangerous. That never stopped me from
          shooting off my mouth before though. I think you would have to acid
          dip the metal to remove any oil/scale/rust then apply the proper flux
          before dipping.
          >
          > Chuck
          >

          Oh, Chuck, you aint half as dangerous as I am!

          I am looking at an old Popular Mechanics article
          entitled (and I kid-you-not) "Hot-Dip Galvanizing
          in Your Own Kitchen" (sure to make you popular with
          the wife.)

          To summarize, after all paint or previous galvanizing
          is removed (burning suggested), the the items are boiled
          in a solution of sodium carbonate (two tablespoons per quart
          of water; boil 5 to 10 minutes; season to taste); then rinse
          in warm water and dry (hair dryer); do not touch with bare
          hands or ya'll get oil on 'em; Then submerge the part
          in hydrochloric acid (borrow from neighbors?) for an hour
          or so until the item has a uniform grey (gray?) color; then
          rinse thouroughly with cold water and dry (hair dryer again)
          Since the metal will start to oxidize almost immediately,
          you should have your pot of molten zinc all prepared( melts
          @ 787 degrees F but the author recommends 820 degrees F)
          Skim scum off top of zinc, sprinkle a little sal ammoniac on
          the zinc, and to quote here, "plunge" the part into the
          zinc. Leave part in the zinc until it is as hot as the
          zinc (remember the 820 degrees?). When the part is ready
          to come out, skim the scum and do the sal ammoniac again,
          reach into the zinc (with tongs, he says), grab the dang
          thing and pull it out, let the zinc drip a moment, and
          plunge (he likes that word) into cold water.

          The author also mentions poision fumes and ventilation,
          but as my wife will have long-since killed me for galvanizing
          her kitchen, I don't really see the point.

          Bye

          Max
        • Luke S
          The days when Popular Mechanics was worth reading. Build your own backyard nuclear reactor , that sort of thing. ... From: vexatious2001
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 2, 2002
          • 0 Attachment
            The days when Popular Mechanics was worth reading. "Build your own backyard
            nuclear reactor " , that sort of thing.
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "vexatious2001" <cadbury@...>
            To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2002 2:55 PM
            Subject: [bolger] Re: Hot dipped zinc


            > --- In bolger@y..., "Chuck Leinweber" <chuck@d...> wrote:
            > > David:
            > >
            > > I know just enough to be dangerous. That never stopped me from
            > shooting off my mouth before though. I think you would have to acid
            > dip the metal to remove any oil/scale/rust then apply the proper flux
            > before dipping.
            > >
            > > Chuck
            > >
            >
            > Oh, Chuck, you aint half as dangerous as I am!
            >
            > I am looking at an old Popular Mechanics article
            > entitled (and I kid-you-not) "Hot-Dip Galvanizing
            > in Your Own Kitchen" (sure to make you popular with
            > the wife.)
            >
            > To summarize, after all paint or previous galvanizing
            > is removed (burning suggested), the the items are boiled
            > in a solution of sodium carbonate (two tablespoons per quart
            > of water; boil 5 to 10 minutes; season to taste); then rinse
            > in warm water and dry (hair dryer); do not touch with bare
            > hands or ya'll get oil on 'em; Then submerge the part
            > in hydrochloric acid (borrow from neighbors?) for an hour
            > or so until the item has a uniform grey (gray?) color; then
            > rinse thouroughly with cold water and dry (hair dryer again)
            > Since the metal will start to oxidize almost immediately,
            > you should have your pot of molten zinc all prepared( melts
            > @ 787 degrees F but the author recommends 820 degrees F)
            > Skim scum off top of zinc, sprinkle a little sal ammoniac on
            > the zinc, and to quote here, "plunge" the part into the
            > zinc. Leave part in the zinc until it is as hot as the
            > zinc (remember the 820 degrees?). When the part is ready
            > to come out, skim the scum and do the sal ammoniac again,
            > reach into the zinc (with tongs, he says), grab the dang
            > thing and pull it out, let the zinc drip a moment, and
            > plunge (he likes that word) into cold water.
            >
            > The author also mentions poision fumes and ventilation,
            > but as my wife will have long-since killed me for galvanizing
            > her kitchen, I don't really see the point.
            >
            > Bye
            >
            > Max
            >
            >
            >
            > Bolger rules!!!
            > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
            > - pls take "personals" off-list, stay on topic, and punctuate
            > - add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts, snip all you like
            > - To order plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA,
            01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
            > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
          • jhkohnen@boat-links.com
            The Vikings would have used wrought iron for fastenings and fittings. Wrought iron is quite resistant to corrosion, the process of its manufacture involves
            Message 5 of 9 , Jan 4, 2002
            • 0 Attachment
              The Vikings would have used wrought iron for fastenings and fittings.
              Wrought iron is quite resistant to corrosion, the process of its
              manufacture involves lots of pounding (to drive out impurites I think, but
              I really don't know) that distributes bits of slag throughout the metal,
              and these inclusions limit rust penetration. Unfortunately, you just can't
              find true wrought iron these days. I talked to a fellow who has a "wrought
              iron" business a while back, he makes railing sand screens and what-not,
              and he didn't even know what real wrought iron is. :o( He uses mild steel.

              On Wed, 2 Jan 2002 20:45:25 -0000, Bill Samson wrote:
              > ...
              > The Vikings use iron boatnails on their ships. Not sure what kind of
              > iron it is (- I'm no metallurgist -) but it seems pretty resistant to
              > corrosion.


              --
              John <jkohnen@...>
              http://www.boat-links.com/
              Why should we take advice on sex from the Pope?
              If he knows anything about it, he shouldn't. <G. B. Shaw>
            • Stuart Crawford
              Wrought iron comes out of swamps. I don t know any more than that though. Stuart Crawford New Zealand
              Message 6 of 9 , Jan 4, 2002
              • 0 Attachment
                Wrought iron comes out of swamps. I don't know any more than that though.

                Stuart Crawford
                New Zealand

                on 4/1/02 9:56 PM, jhkohnen@... at jhkohnen@... wrote:

                > The Vikings would have used wrought iron for fastenings and fittings.
                > Wrought iron is quite resistant to corrosion, the process of its
                > manufacture involves lots of pounding (to drive out impurites I think, but
                > I really don't know) that distributes bits of slag throughout the metal,
                > and these inclusions limit rust penetration. Unfortunately, you just can't
                > find true wrought iron these days. I talked to a fellow who has a "wrought
                > iron" business a while back, he makes railing sand screens and what-not,
                > and he didn't even know what real wrought iron is. :o( He uses mild steel.
                >
                > On Wed, 2 Jan 2002 20:45:25 -0000, Bill Samson wrote:
                >> ...
                >> The Vikings use iron boatnails on their ships. Not sure what kind of
                >> iron it is (- I'm no metallurgist -) but it seems pretty resistant to
                >> corrosion.
                >
              • Luke S
                Hand wrought iron is full of silacious slag and was smelted with charcoal, clean. The slag is what gives wrought iron its timber like grain. Thats the major
                Message 7 of 9 , Jan 4, 2002
                • 0 Attachment
                  Hand wrought iron is full of silacious slag and was smelted with charcoal,
                  clean. The slag is what gives wrought iron its timber like grain. Thats the
                  major visible difference between wrought iron and mild steel. Steel has a
                  crystalline structure, no grain at all.
                  Wrought iron from the industrial age was smelted with coal which led to the
                  inclusion of sulphur in the iron, not desirable at all. I have a pile of
                  genuine wrought iron from that era, when its cleaned bright it rusts
                  readily, but once it has a surface coating of rust the rusting process slows
                  down. I forge for a hobby and I might make some iron nails to experiment.
                  Where does one get hundred year old wrought iron ? Buggy axles, thats where.
                  And yes, the "wrought Iron" of today is mild steel not iron at all.
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: <jhkohnen@...>
                  To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Friday, January 04, 2002 6:56 PM
                  Subject: Re: [bolger] Don't confuse 'galvanised' with 'zinc plated'


                  > The Vikings would have used wrought iron for fastenings and fittings.
                  > Wrought iron is quite resistant to corrosion, the process of its
                  > manufacture involves lots of pounding (to drive out impurites I think, but
                  > I really don't know) that distributes bits of slag throughout the metal,
                  > and these inclusions limit rust penetration. Unfortunately, you just can't
                  > find true wrought iron these days. I talked to a fellow who has a "wrought
                  > iron" business a while back, he makes railing sand screens and what-not,
                  > and he didn't even know what real wrought iron is. :o( He uses mild steel.
                  >
                  > On Wed, 2 Jan 2002 20:45:25 -0000, Bill Samson wrote:
                  > > ...
                  > > The Vikings use iron boatnails on their ships. Not sure what kind of
                  > > iron it is (- I'm no metallurgist -) but it seems pretty resistant to
                  > > corrosion.
                  >
                  >
                  > --
                  > John <jkohnen@...>
                  > http://www.boat-links.com/
                  > Why should we take advice on sex from the Pope?
                  > If he knows anything about it, he shouldn't. <G. B. Shaw>
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Bolger rules!!!
                  > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
                  > - pls take "personals" off-list, stay on topic, and punctuate
                  > - add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts, snip all you like
                  > - To order plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA,
                  01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
                  > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >
                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  >
                  >
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.