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Re: [bolger] galvanized

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  • Luke S
    Heya Will.I agree with galvanized rigging, its more ductile than stainless.Galvanized fittings on deck work as well. Im thinking if I used galvanized nails,
    Message 1 of 11 , Jan 2, 2002
      Heya Will.I agree with galvanized rigging, its more ductile than
      stainless.Galvanized fittings on deck work as well.
      Im thinking if I used galvanized nails, sank the heads just below the
      surface and epoxy puttied them.
      The gal nails I can find here (Australia) dont look bad at all.
      Just thinking of a cheap boat, 250g of gal nails = $3.85, 250g of bronze
      ringshank =$16 to $17.00.

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "willoross" <will@...>
      To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, January 02, 2002 11:47 PM
      Subject: [bolger] galvanized


      > Hi Luke
      > There are lots of places in the world where people think we are funny
      > for our use or stainless in boats they use gaivanized every thing
      > even fore stays and all wireing and every thing else on deck.
      > WILLO
      >
      >
      >
      > Bolger rules!!!
      > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
      > - pls take "personals" off-list, stay on topic, and punctuate
      > - add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts, snip all you like
      > - To order plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA,
      01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
      > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
      >
    • timothyennuinet
      ... bronze ... If you don t mind screw and glue rather than nail and glue , galvanized drywall screws are VERY cheap. Countersinking and 5200 does the
      Message 2 of 11 , Jan 2, 2002
        --- In bolger@y..., "Luke S" <biggie@d...> wrote:
        > Heya Will.I agree with galvanized rigging, its more ductile than
        > stainless.Galvanized fittings on deck work as well.
        > Im thinking if I used galvanized nails, sank the heads just below the
        > surface and epoxy puttied them.
        > The gal nails I can find here (Australia) dont look bad at all.
        > Just thinking of a cheap boat, 250g of gal nails = $3.85, 250g of
        bronze
        > ringshank =$16 to $17.00.

        If you don't mind 'screw and glue' rather than 'nail and glue',
        galvanized drywall screws are VERY cheap. Countersinking and 5200 does
        the trick. I've used a dremel tool for the pilot holes and that can
        make it go pretty quickly. :)

        On another note, I've liked the idea of galvanized rigging for quite
        some time, since I was privy to inspect the parceled and served,
        detached rigging from an old schooner.. it was as bright an shiny as
        new! I'm sure the trick is taking care with the parcel/serve.

        I'm told that using cloth electrical tape (you know, the gummy stuff)
        + 'marline' is the best bet these days. Anyone have experience doing
        this and can offer tips? I know the basic process... materials advice
        would be most helpful! I don't know if I want to get down and dirty
        with tar and canvas! ;)

        --T
      • thomas dalzell
        I haven t seen Galvi drywall screws, are they called that, or something else like deck screws? ______________________________________________________ Send
        Message 3 of 11 , Jan 2, 2002
          I haven't seen Galvi drywall screws, are they called
          that, or something else like deck screws?

          ______________________________________________________
          Send your holiday cheer with http://greetings.yahoo.ca
        • Geren W. Mortensen, Jr.
          Around here, I believe they re referred to as deck screws. ... Geren W. Mortensen, Jr. Columbia, Maryland, USA The future just isn t what it used to be. ...
          Message 4 of 11 , Jan 2, 2002
            Around here, I believe they're referred to as deck screws.

            At 1/2/02 12:22 PM, you wrote:
            >I haven't seen Galvi drywall screws, are they called
            >that, or something else like deck screws?


            Geren W. Mortensen, Jr.
            Columbia, Maryland, USA

            "The future just isn't what it used to be."

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          • sneakeasy2000
            There is a recent book by Roger Duncan, called Dorothy Elizabeth describing the construction of his new 26 ft schooner. He swears by galvanized rigging and
            Message 5 of 11 , Jan 2, 2002
              There is a recent book by Roger Duncan, called "Dorothy Elizabeth"
              describing the construction of his new 26 ft schooner. He swears by
              galvanized rigging and describes in detail the serving etc. in detail.

              I bought my copy from Amazon.com.

              Steve Bosquette

              --- In bolger@y..., "timothyennuinet" <timothy@e...> wrote:
              > --- In bolger@y..., "Luke S" <biggie@d...> wrote:
              > > Heya Will.I agree with galvanized rigging, its more ductile than
              > > stainless.Galvanized fittings on deck work as well.
              > > Im thinking if I used galvanized nails, sank the heads just
              below the
              > > surface and epoxy puttied them.
              > > The gal nails I can find here (Australia) dont look bad at all.
              > > Just thinking of a cheap boat, 250g of gal nails = $3.85, 250g of
              > bronze
              > > ringshank =$16 to $17.00.
              >
              > If you don't mind 'screw and glue' rather than 'nail and glue',
              > galvanized drywall screws are VERY cheap. Countersinking and 5200
              does
              > the trick. I've used a dremel tool for the pilot holes and that can
              > make it go pretty quickly. :)
              >
              > On another note, I've liked the idea of galvanized rigging for quite
              > some time, since I was privy to inspect the parceled and served,
              > detached rigging from an old schooner.. it was as bright an shiny as
              > new! I'm sure the trick is taking care with the parcel/serve.
              >
              > I'm told that using cloth electrical tape (you know, the gummy
              stuff)
              > + 'marline' is the best bet these days. Anyone have experience doing
              > this and can offer tips? I know the basic process... materials
              advice
              > would be most helpful! I don't know if I want to get down and dirty
              > with tar and canvas! ;)
              >
              > --T
            • pvanderwaart
              ... this info. I have this book and used the advice in to when putting a serving on my shrouds to hold the spreader tips in the right place. The instructions
              Message 6 of 11 , Jan 2, 2002
                > Brian Toss's "The Complete Rigger's Apprentice" is the source for
                this info.

                I have this book and used the advice in to when putting a serving on
                my shrouds to hold the spreader tips in the right place. The
                instructions call for "friction tape." Toss has a strong preference
                for either white or black, I forget which.

                Anyway, in my store there was only black, and the primary suggested
                use was taping hockey sticks.

                Peter
              • Harry W. James
                Brian Toss s The Complete Rigger s Apprentice is the source for this info. He maintains that galvanized rigging that is parceled served and maintained
                Message 7 of 11 , Jan 2, 2002
                  Brian Toss's "The Complete Rigger's Apprentice" is the source for this
                  info. He maintains that galvanized rigging that is parceled served and
                  maintained properly is good for a 100 years. He says it will last much
                  longer than Stainless because of fewer problems with fatigue. Bet you
                  never heard that one from your marine hardware store.

                  Well written, informative book still in print.

                  HJ

                  >
                  > On another note, I've liked the idea of galvanized rigging for quite
                  > some time, since I was privy to inspect the parceled and served,
                  > detached rigging from an old schooner.. it was as bright an shiny as
                  > new! I'm sure the trick is taking care with the parcel/serve.
                  >
                  > I'm told that using cloth electrical tape (you know, the gummy stuff)
                  > + 'marline' is the best bet these days. Anyone have experience doing
                  > this and can offer tips? I know the basic process... materials advice
                  > would be most helpful! I don't know if I want to get down and dirty
                  > with tar and canvas! ;)
                  >
                  > --T
                  >
                • David Ryan
                  Beuhler makes a strong case of galvanized, mostly of the boat/no boat variety. ... C.E.P. 134 West 26th St. 12th Floor New York, New York 10001
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jan 2, 2002
                    Beuhler makes a strong case of galvanized, mostly of the boat/no boat variety.


                    >Brian Toss's "The Complete Rigger's Apprentice" is the source for this
                    >info. He maintains that galvanized rigging that is parceled served and
                    >maintained properly is good for a 100 years. He says it will last much
                    >longer than Stainless because of fewer problems with fatigue. Bet you
                    >never heard that one from your marine hardware store.
                    >
                    >Well written, informative book still in print.
                    >
                    >HJ
                    >
                    >>
                    >> On another note, I've liked the idea of galvanized rigging for quite
                    >> some time, since I was privy to inspect the parceled and served,
                    >> detached rigging from an old schooner.. it was as bright an shiny as
                    >> new! I'm sure the trick is taking care with the parcel/serve.
                    >>
                    >> I'm told that using cloth electrical tape (you know, the gummy stuff)
                    >> + 'marline' is the best bet these days. Anyone have experience doing
                    >> this and can offer tips? I know the basic process... materials advice
                    >> would be most helpful! I don't know if I want to get down and dirty
                    >> with tar and canvas! ;)
                    >>
                    >> --T
                    >>
                    >
                    >
                    >Bolger rules!!!
                    >- no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
                    >- pls take "personals" off-list, stay on topic, and punctuate
                    >- add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts, snip all you like
                    >- To order plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester,
                    >MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
                    >- Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    >
                    >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


                    C.E.P.
                    134 West 26th St. 12th Floor
                    New York, New York 10001
                    http://www.crumblingempire.com
                    (212) 247-0296
                  • Harry W. James
                    Mc Feely s at http://www.mcfeelys.com/ has about any kind of deck or sheet rock screw, plus a description of what they are and something about the materials
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jan 2, 2002
                      Mc Feely's at

                      http://www.mcfeelys.com/

                      has about any kind of deck or sheet rock screw, plus a description of
                      what they are and something about the materials they are made out of.

                      HJ


                      "Geren W. Mortensen, Jr." wrote:
                      >
                      > Around here, I believe they're referred to as deck screws.
                      >
                      > At 1/2/02 12:22 PM, you wrote:
                      > >I haven't seen Galvi drywall screws, are they called
                      > >that, or something else like deck screws?
                      >
                      > Geren W. Mortensen, Jr.
                      > Columbia, Maryland, USA
                      >
                      > "The future just isn't what it used to be."
                      >
                      > ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                      >
                    • rdchamberland
                      When I was a young teen at Cass Tech in Detroit my electrical wiring course taught us to wrap soldered splices with first rubber tape then friction tape.
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jan 3, 2002
                        When I was a young teen at Cass Tech in Detroit my electrical wiring
                        course taught us to wrap soldered splices with first rubber tape then
                        friction tape. However I had earlier learned to wrap baseballs that
                        were coming apart, wrap bicycle tire holes with the tape to keep the
                        inner tube in. For a kid friction tape was the equivalent of the
                        present day "duct tape".
                        Bob Chamberland



                        --- In bolger@y..., "pvanderwaart" <pvanderwaart@y...> wrote:
                        > > Brian Toss's "The Complete Rigger's Apprentice" is the source for
                        > this info.
                        >
                        > I have this book and used the advice in to when putting a serving on
                        > my shrouds to hold the spreader tips in the right place. The
                        > instructions call for "friction tape." Toss has a strong preference
                        > for either white or black, I forget which.
                        >
                        > Anyway, in my store there was only black, and the primary suggested
                        > use was taping hockey sticks.
                        >
                        > Peter
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