Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Wyoming, and building cheap.

Expand Messages
  • brucehallman
    ... I think that if you view the boat as a disposable thing with a 10 year life you could justify the use of el cheapo CDX plywood fastened with conventional
    Message 1 of 147 , Jan 1, 2002
      --- In bolger@y..., thomas dalzell <proaconstrictor@y...> wrote:

      > What is the best way to build these boxes cheaply?

      I think that if you view the boat as a disposable thing with a 10
      year life you could justify the use of el cheapo CDX plywood fastened
      with conventional airgun nails and staples. I also think that a lot
      [perhaps all] of the epoxy/glass could be replaced by surplus drapery
      fabric remnants embedded and coated with standard oil based house
      paint bought wholesale.

      With a new coat of oil paint every year or two, it might last more
      than 10 years. Localized rot spots could be treated with GitRot
      and/or reinforced or replaced as needed as ongoing maintenance. You
      also could use some conventional "green / ground contact rating"
      treated plywood and lumber in some of the more sensitive areas
      subject to rotting.

      Inside plywood could be finished brite with concoction of equal parts
      Turpentine, Linseed Oil, and Varnish which I have used for years
      making furniture. It penetrates well and seals too.

      Wooden boats have been sucessfully made lots longer than fiberglass
      and resin have existed. I recall reading somewhere that embedding
      fabric in oil paint used to be common practice. Drapery remnants are
      very cheap, and oil paint isn't all that expensive either.

      As an experement a few months back I used ripped up strips of a old
      dress shirt and left over latex house paint instead of fiberglass and
      resin to tape the seams of the flotation chambers which I built in my
      Roar. These seams appear plenty tight and sturdy now several months
      later.
    • Bruce Hallman
      ... The Sandy Bottoms is the only Anhinga built that I have heard about. The Anhinga is a remarkable design in that it is a spare, simple, big boat. I think
      Message 147 of 147 , Oct 11, 2009
        On Sat, Oct 10, 2009 at 6:53 PM, nonews35 <nonews35@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > Have any Ahingas been built except the Sandy Bottoms one? Is the hull the same as BirdWatcher of is it slab sided? I'm looking to go with something like that or maybe a Martha Jane.
        >
        > Also, I like the idea of a lateen rig also like Zephyr so you can tow the boat to the nearby launch ramp fully rigged it the mast is short enough. Any ideas? I think you could make the mast 11' long and still be OK most places. The Zephyr mast is only 9' the Martha Janes is a bit too high.
        >
        > Cheers,
        > Jeff
        >

        The Sandy Bottoms is the only Anhinga built that I have heard about.
        The Anhinga is a remarkable design in that it is a spare, simple,
        'big' boat. I think it might make sense if what you want is a very
        easily achieved (quick build) trailerable 'oar power auxillary' camp
        cruiser.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.