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Wyoming

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  • jhbjap
    After a week of serious viewing the new Wyo plans, I am impressed with the ease at which a very large boat can be built. Almost no seam taping, fillets only to
    Message 1 of 95 , Dec 31, 2001
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      After a week of serious viewing the new Wyo plans, I am impressed
      with the ease at which a very large boat can be built.

      Almost no seam taping, fillets only to stop water from standing in
      corners. Each bulkhead, seam, etc. is backed up with 1 1/2" square
      frames or larger.

      With a bit of planning, all parts can be cut, epoxy and/or glassed as
      need before assembly using a small garage. Assembly could literally
      be done in a few full days of work with a couple strong helpers. (I
      have 5 sons, teenagers and older.) After assembly, jack up one side
      at a time just enough to finish the chines and bottom seams.

      Still, a large project, but I think she can be assembled in 500
      hours. Another 500 hours or more for fit out and finish work.

      That's the real genius of Mr. Bolger! Ya just gotta love it!

      Jeff
    • stephensonhw@aol.com
      In a message dated 17-07-02 12:03:28 AM E. Australia Standard Time, ... But electrolytic corrosion can happen without any external source of electrical
      Message 95 of 95 , Jul 16, 2002
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        In a message dated 17-07-02 12:03:28 AM E. Australia Standard Time,
        boatbuilding@... writes:


        > . All the outboard connections are insulated from
        > the boat except for the battery and it's isolated from the hull.

        But electrolytic corrosion can happen without any external source of
        electrical current. Try immersing a piece of aluminum in a bucket of salt
        water together with a piece of copper (or a cupro-nickel coin). The
        dissimilar metals produce their own electrical current as the aluminum is
        eaten away.

        Crocodile hunters had to be very careful not to leave brass shell casings in
        the bottom of their aluminum dinghies, else the brass would very quickly
        corrode a hole in the bottom.

        Howard

        Howard


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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