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Wyoming

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  • jhbjap
    After seeing the updates to the Wyoming posted in the Boger2 group, I ordered and just received my copy of the updated plans from Mr. Bolger. A couple
    Message 1 of 95 , Dec 27, 2001
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      After seeing the updates to the Wyoming posted in the Boger2 group, I
      ordered and just received my copy of the updated plans from Mr.
      Bolger.

      A couple important things that I noted right away is that the rear
      cabin is small but very functional for double beds. The head area is
      huge by boat standards and looks to have enough tankage and storage
      for at least of 30 days of self-sufficiency.

      Ample room for fuel storage well vented. With 200 gallons and moving
      at hull speeds, I believe 1000 miles to a fill up is a real number if
      not overly conservative.

      The center cockpit is self draining and high sided for good security
      and line handling should not be a problem. Front cockpit is small
      but again, makes it safe for line handling and anchoring, and it's
      also self draining.

      Draft is increased to 6" inches at about 10,000 lbs displacement. An
      empty boat looks to be around 6000-6500 lbs. I don't believe you
      could go over the 10,000 lbs and expect to handle well in any kind of
      heavy head seas but if used on a river, you could probably add
      another 1000 lbs of gear with little effect on speed or handling.

      When I had asked about sloping the windshield for a more modern look,
      Mr. Bolger stated he'd rather see it sloped forward than back, no
      changes other than common sense needed to make it slope forward 5 -
      10 degrees.

      He recommends photo cells along the the roof since it's big enough
      and no one would walk up there for any reason. In the long run,
      cheaper than a generator if used as a live aboard.

      One note:

      He mentions a "don't look down" type of head with no flushing and a
      12v exhaust fan which is activated when the sealed lid is lifted to
      eliminate the odors. No flushing, no clogging, no parts to wear out
      and could be pumped out through the seat or a fitting out the side of
      the hull. Does anyone know how these are built? Is it simply a "out
      house" design? Not real appealing but simplistic and reliable.

      Jeff
    • stephensonhw@aol.com
      In a message dated 17-07-02 12:03:28 AM E. Australia Standard Time, ... But electrolytic corrosion can happen without any external source of electrical
      Message 95 of 95 , Jul 16, 2002
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        In a message dated 17-07-02 12:03:28 AM E. Australia Standard Time,
        boatbuilding@... writes:


        > . All the outboard connections are insulated from
        > the boat except for the battery and it's isolated from the hull.

        But electrolytic corrosion can happen without any external source of
        electrical current. Try immersing a piece of aluminum in a bucket of salt
        water together with a piece of copper (or a cupro-nickel coin). The
        dissimilar metals produce their own electrical current as the aluminum is
        eaten away.

        Crocodile hunters had to be very careful not to leave brass shell casings in
        the bottom of their aluminum dinghies, else the brass would very quickly
        corrode a hole in the bottom.

        Howard

        Howard


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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