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[bolger] Re: CPES (was Jochems Exposition)

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  • Gregg Shadduck
    Yes, Tom! ... One of the big lessons in building my AS-39/LM2. Gregg
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 31, 1999
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      Yes, Tom!

      <snip>


      > by the time you're done screwing
      > around, you may as well just buy good plywood in the first place.

      One of the big lessons in building my AS-39/LM2.

      Gregg
    • Behrendt, Tom
      About CPES, at the risk of touching off ANOTHER endless discussion (but that s what we re here for, ain t it? ;-) )..... My horse s mouth that I have my info
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 31, 1999
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        About CPES, at the risk of touching off ANOTHER endless discussion (but that's
        what we're here for, ain't it? ;-) ).....

        My horse's mouth that I have my info from are the folks at Smith Brothers in
        Richmond, CA, who makes the stuff, along with some communications with Dave
        Carnell. Basically, it's very, very thinned out Epoxy. The advantage of it
        being thinned out is that it wicks into wood, blocking up the channels in which
        mould (rot) ordinarily grows and creating a moisture barrier that kills (dries
        out) any existing rot. Basically, for a price, very hefty price in some cases,
        you are turning wood into a wood/epoxy composite, not bad, but is it worth it?
        That's for you to decide, obviously it's THE STUFF if you are restoring
        rotted-out wood, but should you pre-emptively slop it onto a new boat? Up to
        you.

        As for "will it turn cheap plywood into good plywood?", in a word, no. It won't
        cross glue lines, so you'll just be "epoxyfying" the face plys (at great cost),
        which don't buy you much. It won't fill in interior voids. Of course, Smith
        Bros. recommended it to me anyway, the idea being that "epoxyfied" outer plys
        would completely seal off any rot-forming interior voids... the costs come out
        to $60 or $70 per 100 sq ft (and remember that you'd have to coat both sides of
        the plywood..so double the price, ouch!) by the time you're done screwing
        around, you may as well just buy good plywood in the first place.

        Smile!

        Tom B.
      • Jack Bearden
        Thanx for the tip, Gregg. Your advice helps lean me more in the direction I was starting to lean anyway (toward good plywood). The quest for good prices in
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 4, 2000
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          Thanx for the tip, Gregg. Your advice helps lean me more in the direction I was starting to lean anyway (toward good plywood). The quest for "good" prices in Atlantic Canada is now my real challenge.
          jeb
        • Gregg Shadduck
          Thanks, Jack. ... As a *real cheapskate* this is a hard lesson for me to learn. The older I get the more I am sympathetic to buying better stuff (tools?) and
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 4, 2000
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            Thanks, Jack.

            > Thanx for the tip, Gregg. Your advice helps lean me more in the direction I was starting to lean anyway (toward good plywood). The quest for "good" prices in Atlantic Canada is now my real challenge.
            > jeb

            As a *real cheapskate* this is a hard lesson for me to learn. The older I get the more I am sympathetic to buying better stuff (tools?) and being done with it, rather than buying cheaper stuff
            (Craftsman?) and either suffering or taking time/a lot of time to improve the marginal product (AC fir plywood?).

            Good luck!

            Gregg
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