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Re: [bolger] Planing epoxy: how hard is it on blades?

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  • Chuck Leinweber
    One thing that might be helpful would be a heat gun. If you cut, chisel, and scrape the ply until there is only a thin layer of wood, you can heat the epoxy
    Message 1 of 10 , Oct 30, 2001
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      One thing that might be helpful would be a heat gun. If you cut, chisel, and scrape the ply until there is only a thin layer of wood, you can heat the epoxy joint, and scrape the remainder down to the exact original surface of the stringer.

      Chuck


      It would depend on there being any fasteners there,
      and also on any stuff added to the epoxy, that might
      harden it, and the brand. I used a Japanese plane
      extensively while making my tri, and plane all sorts
      of stuff with it. They have a very agresive hook
      angle, and will keep cutting even when duall. I
      planed glas, epoxy, and ply, and never sharpened it,
      since my stones where at home away formt he building
      shop. The sole of the plane being wood, needed a shoe
      when I was done. The original shoe had a really wide
      mouth on it, which was ideal.

      I use a polishing grinder with 40 to 80 grit paper on
      it for most of this kind of work, a belt sander is
      another option.


      --- John Kennedy <john.kennedy@...> wrote:




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Lincoln Ross
      I ve found it a useful trick to take the blade out of the plane, hold it at 90 degrees, and use it as a scraper. One of these days I ll have to get one of
      Message 2 of 10 , Oct 30, 2001
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        I've found it a useful trick to take the blade out of the plane, hold
        it at 90 degrees, and use it as a scraper. One of these days I'll have
        to get one of those official scrapers. Especially when the epoxy is
        only a day old it does a nice job. Does need occasional sharpening.
        --- In bolger@y..., thomas dalzell <proaconstrictor@y...> wrote:
        > It would depend on there being any fasteners there,
        > and also on any stuff added to the epoxy, that might
        > harden it, and the brand. I used a Japanese plane
        > extensively while making my tri, and plane all sorts
        > of stuff with it. They have a very agresive hook
        > angle, and will keep cutting even when duall. I
        > planed glas, epoxy, and ply, and never sharpened it,
        > since my stones where at home away formt he building
        > shop. The sole of the plane being wood, needed a shoe
        > when I was done. The original shoe had a really wide
        > mouth on it, which was ideal.
        >
        > I use a polishing grinder with 40 to 80 grit paper on
        > it for most of this kind of work, a belt sander is
        > another option.
        >
        >
        > --- John Kennedy <john.kennedy@g...> wrote:
        >
        > <HR>
        > <html><body>
        > <tt>
        > My Fireball is off-topic as a boat, but perhaps
        > handling the old epoxy is<BR>
        > not.<BR>
        > <BR>
        > Come spring, I'm going to be replacing damaged panels
        > on the bottom.   The<BR>
        > old, damaged, panels are glued to longitudinal
        > stringers - I'm guessing with<BR>
        > epoxy glue.<BR>
        > <BR>
        > I'm guessing that if I remove the panels by sawing
        > alongside the stringers,<BR>
        > then chisel or plane away the rest, I can make the
        > stringers available to<BR>
        > glue new panels onto them.<BR>
        > <BR>
        > How hard is old epoxy on chisel or plane blades? 
        > Am I going to be<BR>
        > sharpening my blades every five minutes?<BR>
        > <BR>
        > Any advice on that problem you can offer?  <BR>
        > <BR>
        > Thanks for the help.<BR>
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      • cha62759@traverse.com
        ... epoxy is ... The ... guessing with ... stringers, ... available to ... blades get a moderate cost chisel for the work and sharpen it as best you can. After
        Message 3 of 10 , Oct 30, 2001
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          --- In bolger@y..., John Kennedy <john.kennedy@g...> wrote:
          > My Fireball is off-topic as a boat, but perhaps handling the old
          epoxy is
          > not.
          >
          > Come spring, I'm going to be replacing damaged panels on the bottom.
          The
          > old, damaged, panels are glued to longitudinal stringers - I'm
          guessing with
          > epoxy glue.
          >
          > I'm guessing that if I remove the panels by sawing alongside the
          stringers,
          > then chisel or plane away the rest, I can make the stringers
          available to
          > glue new panels onto them.
          >
          > How hard is old epoxy on chisel or plane blades? Am I going to be
          > sharpening my blades every five minutes?
          >
          > Any advice on that problem you can offer?
          >
          > Thanks for the help.
          > Hi John, Getting spring fever? If you're concerned about chisel
          blades get a moderate cost chisel for the work and sharpen it as best
          you can. After you saw along side the stringers as you suggest I would
          recommend getting a japanese "Azebiki" saw and cutting into the panel
          above the center of the stringers. That way you have a clean edge to
          your repair. As I recommended some time ago get a medium size slick
          for paring the remainder from the stringer. Sharpening is no big deal
          and best learn now.__I don't think epoxy is particularly hard on edges
          unless it has silica or some such in it. Glue joints are more than
          likely to have microfibres which are not near as abrasive. The other
          approach is to add a glueing strip alongside the present stringers but
          that adds a little more weight; not a problem unless you are going to
          the international Fireball regatta sometime.
          Bob Chamberland_________________________
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        • Dan Bollinger
          You ll be fine if your electric planer has carbide blades unless the panels were tabbed on with fiberglass tape. Personally, I d use an angle grinder with
          Message 4 of 10 , Nov 4, 2001
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            You'll be fine if your electric planer has carbide blades unless the
            panels were tabbed on with fiberglass tape. Personally, I'd use an
            angle grinder with 24/36 grit.
          • ellengaest@boatbuilding.com
            I noticed lately a few references to using the right angle grinder for getting rid of stuff like epoxy and fiberglass.This is a wonderful tool for such
            Message 5 of 10 , Nov 4, 2001
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              I noticed lately a few references to using the right angle grinder
              for getting rid of stuff like epoxy and fiberglass.This is a wonderful
              tool for such purposes but users should always keep in mind the
              following: eye protection in a must when using the big grits like Dan
              refers to(24/36) since you will be generating good sized projectiles
              at a furious rate! Should you opt for something finer like 120
              grit,then a face mask becomes a must as there will now be clouds of
              fine particles floating about to clog your airways!
              It may also prove prudent to become accustomed to wearing leather
              work gloves with this tool since even the slightest contact with flesh
              will be impressive........
              Anyway,not to detract from any of the hubris this machine may
              inspire(and it has so many nifty uses;like hollowing!) but working
              safe is your best assurance of total enjoyment in boat building.
              Sincerely,
              Peter Lenihan,nursing a nasty flu after a cold and wet haul out,from
              the shores of the mighty St.Lawrence............


              --- In bolger@y..., "Dan Bollinger" <danbollinger@h...> wrote:
              > You'll be fine if your electric planer has carbide blades unless the
              > panels were tabbed on with fiberglass tape. Personally, I'd use an
              > angle grinder with 24/36 grit.
            • thomas dalzell
              I remember once getting a really purposeful, below the belt, kickback from my 8 sander, while bending over sanding the inside of an ama. You have to keep the
              Message 6 of 10 , Nov 4, 2001
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                I remember once getting a really purposeful, below the
                belt, kickback from my 8" sander, while bending over
                sanding the inside of an ama. You have to keep the
                geometry of this animal favourable, or bad things can
                happen.



                ellengaest@... wrote:

                <HR>
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                <tt>
                    I noticed lately a few references
                to using the right angle grinder <BR>
                for getting rid of stuff like epoxy and
                fiberglass.This is a wonderful <BR>
                tool for such purposes but users should always keep in
                mind the <BR>
                following: eye protection in a must when using the big
                grits like Dan <BR>
                refers to(24/36) since you will be generating good
                sized projectiles <BR>
                at a furious rate! Should you opt for something finer
                like 120 <BR>
                grit,then a face mask becomes a must as there will now
                be clouds of <BR>
                fine particles floating about to clog your
                airways!<BR>
                    It may also prove prudent to become
                accustomed to wearing leather <BR>
                work gloves with this tool since even the slightest
                contact with flesh <BR>
                will be impressive........<BR>
                    Anyway,not to detract from any of
                the hubris this machine may <BR>
                inspire(and it has so many nifty uses;like hollowing!)
                but working <BR>
                safe is your best assurance of total enjoyment in boat
                building.<BR>
                                                              
                Sincerely,<BR>
                Peter Lenihan,nursing a nasty flu after a cold and wet
                haul out,from <BR>
                the shores of the mighty St.Lawrence............<BR>
                <BR>
                <BR>
                --- In bolger@y..., "Dan Bollinger"
                <danbollinger@h...> wrote:<BR>
                > You'll be fine if your electric planer has
                carbide blades unless the <BR>
                > panels were tabbed on with fiberglass tape. 
                Personally, I'd use an <BR>
                > angle grinder with 24/36 grit.<BR>
                <BR>
                </tt>

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                Bolger rules!!!<BR>
                - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging
                dead horses<BR>
                - pls take "personals" off-list, stay on
                topic, and punctuate<BR>
                - add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts,
                snip all you like<BR>
                - To order plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209,
                Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349<BR>
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              • Dan Bollinger
                Right you are, Peter. Gloves and glasses are a must. I add a respirator when grinding epoxy and glass. And sound muffs are a good idea, too. Those puppies
                Message 7 of 10 , Nov 5, 2001
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                  Right you are, Peter. Gloves and glasses are a must. I add a
                  respirator when grinding epoxy and glass. And sound muffs are a good
                  idea, too. Those puppies are noisy!
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