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RE: [bolger] Re: West Coast Source for Cedar Strip Planking

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  • thomas dalzell
    I don t think you will have any problem mating strips to ply. Roger Hatfield has been making nice charter cats that way for a long time. The fact is that you
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 1, 2001
      I don't think you will have any problem mating strips
      to ply. Roger Hatfield has been making nice charter
      cats that way for a long time. The fact is that you
      don't need a chine log or beafy fillet, as long as you
      continue the glass over both sides. It may be a
      little heavier, but not enough to matter in almost any
      application In most cases the only additional weight
      will be a species of wood thing, and some ply like
      luan is pretty light. On the other hand it does seem
      like a weird practive, not so much structurally as
      otherwise. JUst to save the little bit of time and
      cost involved in laying strips strips, I think one
      would degrade the resale value of the boat
      significantly. I don't hink people think that way
      about decks, but in hulls, it will tend to stand uot
      more, particularly in the topsides.



      to meet. On sides strip to fill past the sheer<BR>
      full-length, then trim to sheer line; finish details
      (gunwales, etc.) will<BR>
      strengthen that edge and make taper cuts less obvious.
      Multi-chine hulls may<BR>
      require tapering some strips so all chines fall on the
      joint between two<BR>
      strips for their full length, which could be tricky
      and tedious to do. But<BR>
      while multi-chines are no doubt easier to do as
      stitch-and-glue, you can get<BR>
      more rounded ends and things like vertical flare with
      strips, a possible<BR>
      argument for using it.<BR>
      <BR>
      Having built several strip boats, I'd be more worried
      about mating a<BR>
      strip-sided hull to a ply bottom, than trying to strip
      the whole thing. The<BR>
      extra materials (chine log, or beefy fillet) needed to
      do it well would no<BR>
      doubt make the boat heavier than a fully-stripped
      version of the same hull<BR>
      (not to mention plywood being heavier than strips
      anyway). Corners are<BR>
      always vulnerable spots on boats, especially on the
      bottom, so stripping may<BR>
      not be the best thing if it's to be used hard. If you
      really want to build a<BR>
      strip boat, you might want to pick a design with a
      shape that will benefit<BR>
      more from the technique, as it is pretty labor
      intensive no matter what<BR>
      you're building.<BR>
      <

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