Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Redwood?

Expand Messages
  • boatbuilding@goldencoast.com
    Redwood is never mentioned as an option for boat building. I was just curious as to why that may be. It has reasonable rot resistance, if allowed to dry good
    Message 1 of 11 , Oct 1, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      Redwood is never mentioned as an option for boat building. I was
      just curious as to why that may be. It has reasonable rot
      resistance, if allowed to dry good and epoxy coated would stable. I
      know it may not perfect but for stringers and bilge areas, would it
      be a decent option? Epoxy coated, it would last the life a any wood
      boat.

      Curious?

      Jeff
    • boatbuilding@goldencoast.com
      It doesn t seem to be mentioned here but can Redwood be use in boat building. It has reasonable rot resistance, and when properly dried, fairly stable. Epoxy
      Message 2 of 11 , Oct 1, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        It doesn't seem to be mentioned here but can Redwood be use in boat
        building. It has reasonable rot resistance, and when properly dried,
        fairly stable. Epoxy coated, it should last the life of a wood
        boat.

        I sent this once already as doesn't seem to be posted so I'll try
        again. Hopefully we don't get two.

        Jeff Blunck
      • thomas dalzell
        Yes sure can, think strip canoes etc... But it also excells for stuff like rudders, centerboards, and paddles, wingspars. The Gougeons are big promoters when
        Message 3 of 11 , Oct 1, 2001
        • 0 Attachment
          Yes sure can, think strip canoes etc... But it also
          excells for stuff like rudders, centerboards, and
          paddles, wingspars. The Gougeons are big promoters
          when encapsulated. They built Adreneline a race
          winning formula 40 out of cedar/carbon. On the other
          hand, the good stuff is cheapish, but not in
          comparison to marine plywood.


          --- boatbuilding@... wrote:

          <HR>
          <html><body>
          <tt>
          It doesn't seem to be mentioned here but can Redwood
          be use in boat <BR>
          building.  It has reasonable rot resistance, and
          when properly dried, <BR>
          fairly stable.  Epoxy coated, it should last the
          life of a wood <BR>
          boat.  <BR>
          <BR>
          I sent this once already as doesn't seem to be posted
          so I'll try <BR>
          again.  Hopefully we don't get two.<BR>
          <BR>
          Jeff Blunck<BR>
          <BR>
          <BR>
          <BR>
          </tt>

          <br>

          <!-- |**|begin egp html banner|**| -->

          <table border=0 cellspacing=0 cellpadding=2>
          <tr bgcolor=#FFFFCC>
          <td align=center><font size="-1"
          color=#003399><b>Yahoo! Groups Sponsor</b></font></td>
          </tr>
          <tr bgcolor=#FFFFFF>
          <td align=center width=470><table border=0
          cellpadding=0 cellspacing=0><tr><td align=center><font
          face=arial
          size=-2>ADVERTISEMENT</font><br>
          <script language=javascript>
          finalURL =
          "http://rd.yahoo.com/M=168643.1620686.3168692.1261774/D=egroupweb/S=1705065791:HM/A=799560/R=0/*http://shop.store.yahoo.com/cgi-bin/clink?overstock3+shopping:dmad/M=168643.1620686.3168692.1261774/D=egroupweb/S=1705065791:HM/A=799560/R=1/1001958293+http://us.rmi.yahoo.com/rmi/http://www.overstock.com/rmi-framed-url/http://www.overstock.com/cgi-bin/d2.cgi%3Fcid=12715";
          var flashFileURL =
          "http://java.yahoo.com/a/1-/flash/misc/osyahooswf_0925.swf";
          var noFlashImg =
          "http://java.yahoo.com/a/1-/flash/misc/osyahooalt_0925.gif";
          </script>
          <script language=JavaScript
          src=http://java.yahoo.com/a/1-/flash/test/0124/lrec_browser_071601.js>
          </script>
          <script language=JavaScript>
          function makeNewWindow(url) {
          var newWindow = window.open(url); }
          </script>
          <noscript>
          <a
          href="http://rd.yahoo.com/M=168643.1620686.3168692.1261774/D=egroupweb/S=1705065791:HM/A=799560/R=2/*http://shop.store.yahoo.com/cgi-bin/clink?overstock3+shopping:dmad/M=168643.1620686.3168692.1261774/D=egroupweb/S=1705065791:HM/A=799560/R=3/1001958293+http://us.rmi.yahoo.com/rmi/http://www.overstock.com/rmi-framed-url/http://www.overstock.com/cgi-bin/d2.cgi%3Fcid=12715"
          target="_blank">
          <img
          src="http://java.yahoo.com/a/1-/flash/misc/osyahooalt_0925.gif"
          width=300 height=250 border=0></a>
          </noscript>
          </td></tr></table></td>
          </tr>
          <tr><td><img alt="" width=1 height=1
          src="http://us.adserver.yahoo.com/l?M=168643.1620686.3168692.1261774/D=egroupmail/S=1705065791:HM/A=799560/rand=283101620"></td></tr>
          </table>

          <!-- |**|end egp html banner|**| -->


          <br>
          <tt>
          Bolger rules!!!<BR>
          - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging
          dead horses<BR>
          - pls take "personals" off-list, stay on
          topic, and punctuate<BR>
          - add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts,
          snip all you like<BR>
          - To order plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209,
          Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349<BR>
          - Unsubscribe: 
          bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com</tt>
          <br>

          <br>
          <tt>Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the <a
          href="http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/">Yahoo! Terms
          of Service</a>.</tt>
          </br>

          </body></html>



          _______________________________________________________
          Do You Yahoo!?
          Get your free @... address at http://mail.yahoo.ca
        • Harry W. James
          I didn t know that they were using redwood in modern composite boat building. A red and yellow cedar strip hull with redwood worked in artistically would be
          Message 4 of 11 , Oct 1, 2001
          • 0 Attachment
            I didn't know that they were using redwood in modern composite boat
            building. A red and yellow cedar strip hull with redwood worked in
            artistically would be pretty spectacular. As far as I know they did
            not use redwood for boatbuilding in the old days. I have a dim memory
            of asking my dad about why they didn't use it when it was readily
            available, and as I remember, he said it split too easily.

            The battles of the Save the Redwoods League, to save the Sequoia
            Gigantia's up in the Sierra in the late 40's early 50's, was not to
            keep the Redwoods from being logged. Lumber guys have told me that
            their wood did not have much value. The 3000-4500 ft level where they
            grow promotes very large Pines and Cedars (12-15 ft through the trunk,
            200 ft plus tall) which are necessary to hold down the roots of the
            big boys. These trees were the ones the logging companies wanted.

            You can understand this if you have ever stood under a Sugar Pine with
            a trunk 12' through and a clear run of 100 ft to the first branch. You
            can picture that incredibly tight grained, clear lumber hidden from
            your prying eyes just underneath the bark. It is enough to inspire
            lust in even an amateur woodworker.



            thomas dalzell wrote:
            >
            > Yes sure can, think strip canoes etc... But it also
            > excells for stuff like rudders, centerboards, and
            > paddles, wingspars. The Gougeons are big promoters
            > when encapsulated. They built Adreneline a race
            > winning formula 40 out of cedar/carbon. On the other
            > hand, the good stuff is cheapish, but not in
            > comparison to marine plywood.
            >
            > --- boatbuilding@... wrote:
            >
            > <HR>
            > <html><body>
            > <tt>
            > It doesn't seem to be mentioned here but can Redwood
            > be use in boat <BR>
            > building.  It has reasonable rot resistance, and
            > when properly dried, <BR>
            > fairly stable.  Epoxy coated, it should last the
            > life of a wood <BR>
            > boat.  <BR>
            > <BR>
            > I sent this once already as doesn't seem to be posted
            > so I'll try <BR>
            > again.  Hopefully we don't get two.<BR>
            > <BR>
            > Jeff Blunck<BR>
            > <BR>
            > <BR>
            > <BR>
            > </tt>
            >
            >
          • Jeff Blunck
            I would believe that Redwood would split if used in high stress areas. When it s dried out, it is light and tender like good old white pine. My thoughts
            Message 5 of 11 , Oct 1, 2001
            • 0 Attachment
              I would believe that Redwood would split if used in high stress areas. When
              it's dried out, it is light and tender like good old white pine. My
              thoughts where to use it in places hard to get too to check for moisture. I
              just figured that coated in epoxy, it might be the ticket for those hard to
              reach places for things like internal chine logs, bulkhead framing, etc.

              Glued next to plywood as on bulkhead frames would help splitting and might
              be the way to go if there wasn't a real problems using it. Safer than
              cutting and handling treated lumber.

              Some really nice 2 X 2 stuff at the local lumber yard right now.

              Jeff

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Harry W. James" <welshman@...>
              To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Monday, October 01, 2001 2:42 PM
              Subject: Re: [bolger] Redwood?


              > I didn't know that they were using redwood in modern composite boat
              > building. A red and yellow cedar strip hull with redwood worked in
              > artistically would be pretty spectacular. As far as I know they did
              > not use redwood for boatbuilding in the old days. I have a dim memory
              > of asking my dad about why they didn't use it when it was readily
              > available, and as I remember, he said it split too easily.
              >
              > The battles of the Save the Redwoods League, to save the Sequoia
              > Gigantia's up in the Sierra in the late 40's early 50's, was not to
              > keep the Redwoods from being logged. Lumber guys have told me that
              > their wood did not have much value. The 3000-4500 ft level where they
              > grow promotes very large Pines and Cedars (12-15 ft through the trunk,
              > 200 ft plus tall) which are necessary to hold down the roots of the
              > big boys. These trees were the ones the logging companies wanted.
              >
              > You can understand this if you have ever stood under a Sugar Pine with
              > a trunk 12' through and a clear run of 100 ft to the first branch. You
              > can picture that incredibly tight grained, clear lumber hidden from
              > your prying eyes just underneath the bark. It is enough to inspire
              > lust in even an amateur woodworker.
              >
              >
              >
              > thomas dalzell wrote:
            • thomas dalzell
              Always keep in mind that any lumber larger than 1x1 can t be counted on to be stable with a coating alone. Redwood splits very easilly so I wouldn t use it for
              Message 6 of 11 , Oct 1, 2001
              • 0 Attachment
                Always keep in mind that any lumber larger than 1x1
                can't be counted on to be stable with a coating alone.
                Redwood splits very easilly so I wouldn't use it for
                things you are nailling to or screwing to. If you are
                worried about wood rot, just use epoxy coving, it is
                easy to instal, and will not rot etc...
                --- Jeff Blunck <boatbuilding@...> wrote:

                <HR>
                <html><body>
                <tt>
                I would believe that Redwood would split if used in
                high stress areas.  When<BR>
                it's dried out, it is light and tender like good old
                white pine.  My<BR>
                thoughts where to use it in places hard to get too to
                check for moisture.  I<BR>
                just figured that coated in epoxy, it might be the
                ticket for those hard to<BR>
                reach places for things like internal chine logs,
                bulkhead framing, etc.<BR>
                <BR>
                Glued next to plywood as on bulkhead frames would help
                splitting and might<BR>
                be the way to go if there wasn't a real problems using
                it.  Safer than<BR>
                cutting and handling treated lumber.<BR>
                <BR>
                Some really nice 2 X 2 stuff at the local lumber yard
                right now.<BR>
                <BR>
                Jeff<BR>
                <BR>
                ----- Original Message -----<BR>
                From: "Harry W. James"
                <welshman@...><BR>
                To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com><BR>
                Sent: Monday, October 01, 2001 2:42 PM<BR>
                Subject: Re: [bolger] Redwood?<BR>
                <BR>
                <BR>
                > I didn't know that they were using redwood in
                modern composite boat<BR>
                > building. A red and yellow cedar strip hull with
                redwood worked in<BR>
                > artistically would be pretty spectacular. As far
                as I know they did<BR>
                > not use redwood for boatbuilding in the old days.
                I have a dim memory<BR>
                > of asking my dad about why they didn't use it
                when it was readily<BR>
                > available, and as I remember, he said it split
                too easily.<BR>
                ><BR>
                > The battles of the Save the Redwoods League, to
                save the Sequoia<BR>
                > Gigantia's up in the Sierra in the late 40's
                early 50's, was not to<BR>
                > keep the Redwoods from being logged. Lumber guys
                have told me that<BR>
                > their wood did not have much value. The 3000-4500
                ft level where they<BR>
                > grow promotes very large Pines and Cedars (12-15
                ft through the trunk,<BR>
                > 200 ft plus tall) which are necessary to hold
                down the roots of the<BR>
                > big boys. These trees were the ones the logging
                companies wanted.<BR>
                ><BR>
                > You can understand this if you have ever stood
                under a Sugar Pine with<BR>
                > a trunk 12' through and a clear run of 100 ft to
                the first branch. You<BR>
                > can picture that incredibly tight grained, clear
                lumber hidden from<BR>
                > your prying eyes just underneath the bark. It is
                enough to inspire<BR>
                > lust in even an amateur woodworker.<BR>
                ><BR>
                ><BR>
                ><BR>
                > thomas dalzell wrote:<BR>
                <BR>
                <BR>
                </tt>

                <br>

                <!-- |**|begin egp html banner|**| -->

                <table border=0 cellspacing=0 cellpadding=2>
                <tr bgcolor=#FFFFCC>
                <td align=center><font size="-1"
                color=#003399><b>Yahoo! Groups Sponsor</b></font></td>
                </tr>
                <tr bgcolor=#FFFFFF>
                <td align=center width=470><table border=0
                cellpadding=0 cellspacing=0><tr><td align=center><font
                face=arial
                size=-2>ADVERTISEMENT</font><br>
                <script language=javascript>
                finalURL =
                "http://rd.yahoo.com/M=168643.1620686.3168692.1261774/D=egroupweb/S=1705065791:HM/A=799560/R=0/*http://shop.store.yahoo.com/cgi-bin/clink?overstock3+shopping:dmad/M=168643.1620686.3168692.1261774/D=egroupweb/S=1705065791:HM/A=799560/R=1/1001969595+http://us.rmi.yahoo.com/rmi/http://www.overstock.com/rmi-framed-url/http://www.overstock.com/cgi-bin/d2.cgi%3Fcid=12715";
                var flashFileURL =
                "http://java.yahoo.com/a/1-/flash/misc/osyahooswf_0925.swf";
                var noFlashImg =
                "http://java.yahoo.com/a/1-/flash/misc/osyahooalt_0925.gif";
                </script>
                <script language=JavaScript
                src=http://java.yahoo.com/a/1-/flash/test/0124/lrec_browser_071601.js>
                </script>
                <script language=JavaScript>
                function makeNewWindow(url) {
                var newWindow = window.open(url); }
                </script>
                <noscript>
                <a
                href="http://rd.yahoo.com/M=168643.1620686.3168692.1261774/D=egroupweb/S=1705065791:HM/A=799560/R=2/*http://shop.store.yahoo.com/cgi-bin/clink?overstock3+shopping:dmad/M=168643.1620686.3168692.1261774/D=egroupweb/S=1705065791:HM/A=799560/R=3/1001969595+http://us.rmi.yahoo.com/rmi/http://www.overstock.com/rmi-framed-url/http://www.overstock.com/cgi-bin/d2.cgi%3Fcid=12715"
                target="_blank">
                <img
                src="http://java.yahoo.com/a/1-/flash/misc/osyahooalt_0925.gif"
                width=300 height=250 border=0></a>
                </noscript>
                </td></tr></table></td>
                </tr>
                <tr><td><img alt="" width=1 height=1
                src="http://us.adserver.yahoo.com/l?M=168643.1620686.3168692.1261774/D=egroupmail/S=1705065791:HM/A=799560/rand=825759370"></td></tr>
                </table>

                <!-- |**|end egp html banner|**| -->


                <br>
                <tt>
                Bolger rules!!!<BR>
                - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging
                dead horses<BR>
                - pls take "personals" off-list, stay on
                topic, and punctuate<BR>
                - add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts,
                snip all you like<BR>
                - To order plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209,
                Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349<BR>
                - Unsubscribe: 
                bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com</tt>
                <br>

                <br>
                <tt>Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the <a
                href="http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/">Yahoo! Terms
                of Service</a>.</tt>
                </br>

                </body></html>



                _______________________________________________________
                Do You Yahoo!?
                Get your free @... address at http://mail.yahoo.ca
              • thomas dalzell
                I guess they hadn t invented the deck yet ;0). The kind of wood I am talking about should probably be used only for classical guitars, and other high end
                Message 7 of 11 , Oct 1, 2001
                • 0 Attachment
                  I guess they hadn't invented the deck yet ;0). The
                  kind of wood I am talking about should probably be
                  used only for classical guitars, and other high end
                  stuff. But as long as they keep making shingles out
                  of it, I don't know what to say.

                  Your right about splitting. But in composite, its the
                  way it works as a core that matters, which is a
                  different issue.

                  Fascinating history.


                  --- "Harry W. James" <welshman@...> wrote:

                  <HR>
                  <html><body>
                  <tt>
                  I didn't know that they were using redwood in modern
                  composite boat<BR>
                  building. A red and yellow cedar strip hull with
                  redwood worked in<BR>
                  artistically would be pretty spectacular. As far as I
                  know they did<BR>
                  not use redwood for boatbuilding in the old days. I
                  have a dim memory<BR>
                  of asking my dad about why they didn't use it when it
                  was readily<BR>
                  available, and as I remember, he said it split too
                  easily.<BR>
                  <BR>
                  The battles of the Save the Redwoods League, to save
                  the Sequoia<BR>
                  Gigantia's up in the Sierra in the late 40's early
                  50's, was not to<BR>
                  keep the Redwoods from being logged. Lumber guys have
                  told me that<BR>
                  their wood did not have much value. The 3000-4500 ft
                  level where they<BR>
                  grow promotes very large Pines and Cedars (12-15 ft
                  through the trunk,<BR>
                  200 ft plus tall) which are necessary to hold down the
                  roots of the<BR>
                  big boys. These trees were the ones the logging
                  companies wanted. <BR>
                  <BR>
                  You can understand this if you have ever stood under a
                  Sugar Pine with<BR>
                  a trunk 12' through and a clear run of 100 ft to the
                  first branch. You<BR>
                  can picture that incredibly tight grained, clear
                  lumber hidden from<BR>
                  your prying eyes just underneath the bark. It is
                  enough to inspire<BR>
                  lust in even an amateur woodworker. <BR>
                  <BR>
                  <BR>
                  <BR>
                  thomas dalzell wrote:<BR>
                  > <BR>
                  > Yes sure can, think strip canoes etc...  But
                  it also<BR>
                  > excells for stuff like rudders, centerboards,
                  and<BR>
                  > paddles, wingspars.  The Gougeons are big
                  promoters<BR>
                  > when encapsulated.  They built Adreneline a
                  race<BR>
                  > winning formula 40 out of cedar/carbon.  On
                  the other<BR>
                  > hand, the good stuff is cheapish, but not in<BR>
                  > comparison to marine plywood.<BR>
                  > <BR>
                  > --- boatbuilding@... wrote:<BR>
                  > <BR>
                  > <HR><BR>
                  > <html><body><BR>
                  > <tt><BR>
                  > It doesn't seem to be mentioned here but can
                  Redwood<BR>
                  > be use in boat <BR><BR>
                  > building.&nbsp; It has reasonable rot
                  resistance, and<BR>
                  > when properly dried, <BR><BR>
                  > fairly stable.&nbsp; Epoxy coated, it should
                  last the<BR>
                  > life of a wood <BR><BR>
                  > boat.&nbsp; <BR><BR>
                  > <BR><BR>
                  > I sent this once already as doesn't seem to be
                  posted<BR>
                  > so I'll try <BR><BR>
                  > again.&nbsp; Hopefully we don't get
                  two.<BR><BR>
                  > <BR><BR>
                  > Jeff Blunck<BR><BR>
                  > <BR><BR>
                  > <BR><BR>
                  > <BR><BR>
                  > </tt><BR>
                  > <BR>
                  ><BR>
                  </tt>

                  <br>

                  <!-- |**|begin egp html banner|**| -->

                  <table border=0 cellspacing=0 cellpadding=2>
                  <tr bgcolor=#FFFFCC>
                  <td align=center><font size="-1"
                  color=#003399><b>Yahoo! Groups Sponsor</b></font></td>
                  </tr>
                  <tr bgcolor=#FFFFFF>
                  <td align=center width=470><table border=0
                  cellpadding=0 cellspacing=0><tr><td align=center><font
                  face=arial
                  size=-2>ADVERTISEMENT</font><br>
                  <script language=javascript>
                  finalURL =
                  "http://rd.yahoo.com/M=168643.1620686.3168692.1261774/D=egroupweb/S=1705065791:HM/A=799560/R=0/*http://shop.store.yahoo.com/cgi-bin/clink?overstock3+shopping:dmad/M=168643.1620686.3168692.1261774/D=egroupweb/S=1705065791:HM/A=799560/R=1/1001968806+http://us.rmi.yahoo.com/rmi/http://www.overstock.com/rmi-framed-url/http://www.overstock.com/cgi-bin/d2.cgi%3Fcid=12715";
                  var flashFileURL =
                  "http://java.yahoo.com/a/1-/flash/misc/osyahooswf_0925.swf";
                  var noFlashImg =
                  "http://java.yahoo.com/a/1-/flash/misc/osyahooalt_0925.gif";
                  </script>
                  <script language=JavaScript
                  src=http://java.yahoo.com/a/1-/flash/test/0124/lrec_browser_071601.js>
                  </script>
                  <script language=JavaScript>
                  function makeNewWindow(url) {
                  var newWindow = window.open(url); }
                  </script>
                  <noscript>
                  <a
                  href="http://rd.yahoo.com/M=168643.1620686.3168692.1261774/D=egroupweb/S=1705065791:HM/A=799560/R=2/*http://shop.store.yahoo.com/cgi-bin/clink?overstock3+shopping:dmad/M=168643.1620686.3168692.1261774/D=egroupweb/S=1705065791:HM/A=799560/R=3/1001968806+http://us.rmi.yahoo.com/rmi/http://www.overstock.com/rmi-framed-url/http://www.overstock.com/cgi-bin/d2.cgi%3Fcid=12715"
                  target="_blank">
                  <img
                  src="http://java.yahoo.com/a/1-/flash/misc/osyahooalt_0925.gif"
                  width=300 height=250 border=0></a>
                  </noscript>
                  </td></tr></table></td>
                  </tr>
                  <tr><td><img alt="" width=1 height=1
                  src="http://us.adserver.yahoo.com/l?M=168643.1620686.3168692.1261774/D=egroupmail/S=1705065791:HM/A=799560/rand=985409935"></td></tr>
                  </table>

                  <!-- |**|end egp html banner|**| -->


                  <br>
                  <tt>
                  Bolger rules!!!<BR>
                  - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging
                  dead horses<BR>
                  - pls take "personals" off-list, stay on
                  topic, and punctuate<BR>
                  - add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts,
                  snip all you like<BR>
                  - To order plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209,
                  Gloucester, MA, 01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349<BR>
                  - Unsubscribe: 
                  bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com</tt>
                  <br>

                  <br>
                  <tt>Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the <a
                  href="http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/">Yahoo! Terms
                  of Service</a>.</tt>
                  </br>

                  </body></html>



                  _______________________________________________________
                  Do You Yahoo!?
                  Get your free @... address at http://mail.yahoo.ca
                • Chris Crandall
                  ... It s largely because western red cedar is a better option on almost every dimension. Cedar is lighter, often cheaper, more plentiful around the country,
                  Message 8 of 11 , Oct 2, 2001
                  • 0 Attachment
                    On Mon, 1 Oct 2001 boatbuilding@... wrote:
                    > Redwood is never mentioned as an option for boat building. I was just
                    > curious as to why that may be. It has reasonable rot resistance, if
                    > allowed to dry good and epoxy coated would stable. I know it may not
                    > perfect but for stringers and bilge areas, would it be a decent
                    > option? Epoxy coated, it would last the life a any wood boat.

                    It's largely because western red cedar is a better option on almost every
                    dimension. Cedar is lighter, often cheaper, more plentiful around the
                    country, less prone to splitting, and more able to take a pounding.

                    I used red cedar as a butt block that runs athwart my shantyboat's cabin
                    sole (it was a quickie boat, and the bottoms side of the plywood panels
                    are completely epoxy/fiberglassed). We walk all over it, scuffing along,
                    and drop things on it. Very little signs of wear--I've benn quite happily
                    surprised.

                    Redwood is occasionally used in strippers. However, there's not much
                    grain--it's a nice color, but solid. Cedar, on the other hand, cna have a
                    very nice grain to it, too.


                    Chris Crandall crandall@... (785) 864-4131
                    Department of Psychology University of Kansas Lawrence, KS 66045
                    I have data convincingly disconfirming the Duhem-Quine hypothesis.
                  • Paul Lefebvre
                    ... I ve used some redwood in my strippers. The small strips of redwood split very easily when stapled or nailed - they also don t tolerate much bending before
                    Message 9 of 11 , Oct 2, 2001
                    • 0 Attachment
                      >
                      > Redwood is occasionally used in strippers. However, there's not much
                      > grain--it's a nice color, but solid. Cedar, on the other hand, cna have a
                      > very nice grain to it, too.

                      I've used some redwood in my strippers. The small strips of redwood split
                      very easily when stapled or nailed - they also don't tolerate much bending
                      before splitting. But it can make very nice accent strips, which is about
                      all I have the patience to use it for. Nothing really comes close to western
                      red cedar for stripping - lightweight, beautiful, easy to work, smells good,
                      etc..... I agree with Tom Dalzell, and Harry James's posts - I've stood next
                      to some big red cedars in the Sierras, and they are a sight to behold; it's
                      a shame to see so much perfect red cedar split into shingles - it oughta be
                      reserved for musical instruments - and boats!

                      Paul L
                    • jonpit@yahoo.com
                      It is true that redwood is generally light , soft and easily splits along the grain. But, in many years of working with it I ve noticed a great range of
                      Message 10 of 11 , Oct 6, 2001
                      • 0 Attachment
                        It is true that redwood is generally light , soft and easily splits
                        along the grain. But, in many years of working with it I've noticed a
                        great range of variation in the material. "Redwood" refers to Sequoia
                        sempervirens - the coast redwood which is used for lumber. The Giant
                        Sequoia that groes in the Sierras is another material. Old, slow growth
                        Redwood tends to be a completely different material which seems denser
                        across grain and less prone to split. It also has more tannins and rot
                        resistance. It is readily available in large unmolested pieces from
                        water and wine tanks, old beams and ext. architectural elements.

                        , w --- In bolger@y..., boatbuilding@g... wrote:
                        > Redwood is never mentioned as an option for boat building. I was
                        > just curious as to why that may be. It has reasonable rot
                        > resistance, if allowed to dry good and epoxy coated would stable. I
                        > know it may not perfect but for stringers and bilge areas, would it
                        > be a decent option? Epoxy coated, it would last the life a any wood
                        > boat.
                        >
                        > Curious?
                        >
                        > Jeff
                      • sanmi@yahoo.com
                        I used cheap pine for the chine logs on my AF3 sharpie, but I built the mast out of redwood because it was the only straight, clear 16 stock they had (a
                        Message 11 of 11 , Oct 8, 2001
                        • 0 Attachment
                          I used cheap pine for the chine logs on my AF3 sharpie, but I built
                          the mast out of redwood because it was the only straight, clear 16'
                          stock they had (a Lumber Yard in Colorado Springs, CO). It was kind
                          of expensive, but the end result was good. I chose stock that didn't
                          have much sapwood and then cut to avoid all sapwood. I had to plug
                          only one 3/4" knothole. The mast is plenty bendy and doesn't seem
                          too brittle.

                          scarfing pictures:
                          http://www.geocities.com/sanmi/creamcheese/scarf1.jpg
                          http://www.geocities.com/sanmi/creamcheese/scarf2.jpg
                          http://www.geocities.com/sanmi/creamcheese/scarf3.jpg


                          --- In bolger@y..., jonpit@y... wrote:
                          > It is true that redwood is generally light , soft and easily
                          splits
                          > along the grain. But, in many years of working with it I've
                          noticed a
                          > great range of variation in the material. "Redwood" refers to
                          Sequoia
                          > sempervirens - the coast redwood which is used for lumber. The
                          Giant
                          > Sequoia that groes in the Sierras is another material. Old, slow
                          growth
                          > Redwood tends to be a completely different material which seems
                          denser
                          > across grain and less prone to split. It also has more tannins and
                          rot
                          > resistance. It is readily available in large unmolested pieces from
                          > water and wine tanks, old beams and ext. architectural elements.
                          >
                          > , w --- In bolger@y..., boatbuilding@g... wrote:
                          > > Redwood is never mentioned as an option for boat building. I was
                          > > just curious as to why that may be. It has reasonable rot
                          > > resistance, if allowed to dry good and epoxy coated would
                          stable. I
                          > > know it may not perfect but for stringers and bilge areas, would
                          it
                          > > be a decent option? Epoxy coated, it would last the life a any
                          wood
                          > > boat.
                          > >
                          > > Curious?
                          > >
                          > > Jeff
                        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.