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Re: [bolger] Re: Looking for a 16' sharpie/flattie

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  • wmrpage@aol.com
    In a message dated 9/4/01 6:46:08 PM Central Daylight Time, ... The Dobler 16 looks like a very nice all-around boat. In his book Low-Resistance Boats ,
    Message 1 of 39 , Sep 4, 2001
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      In a message dated 9/4/01 6:46:08 PM Central Daylight Time,
      PseudoDion3@... writes:


      > You also might
      > consider Tom Jones "Dobler 16". It is a taped seam construction boat
      > with dagger board. The address for his website
      > ishttp://www.jonesboats.com/dobler16.html
      >
      >

      The "Dobler 16" looks like a very nice all-around boat. In his book
      "Low-Resistance Boats", Jones can hardly speak well enough about the design.
      He also indicates that he built his first example of this boat with
      conventional chine "logs", as he distrusted "taped-seam" construction at the
      time. The designer, Joseph C. Dobler, has passed away and evidently left his
      drawings in some disarray. Mr. Jones has re-drawn the plans with the approval
      of Mr. Dobler's estate and made them available.

      I recently purchased a set of plans from him not long ago, but I find the
      plans rather intimidating. This is not the kind of "stitch-and-glue" design
      where you cut out panels to shape and bend them over a couple of points for
      assembly. The 5 sheets of plans and accompanying three sheets of
      supplementary material do not include a standard offset table, so I don't see
      how the design could be lofted for "conventional" construction. Although
      there is no indication of it on the sheets of plans, the fifth paragraph on
      the second page of supplementary materials notes that the topsides are "more
      than 16" (sic) long". (He means more that 16' long - i.e. the expansions
      shown will not meet!) His recommendation is that the two panels (per side) be
      "glued and screwed" to the "stem" and stern (i.e. the transom) and then an
      "approximately 12"X14" piece" fitted amidships. As no stem is indicated on
      the drawings, one can only assume that "stem-less" construction (i.e.
      stitch-and-glue + fiberglass tape + fillets) is intended.

      All in all, perhaps not a design that would give an experienced boatbuilder
      any pause, but enough to discourage me.

      Ciao for Niao,
      Bill in MN


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • sanmi@yahoo.com
      ... Did ... I built the boat pretty much exactly as Jim MIchalak specifies, with a few minor exceptions. I *think* I used 6oz cloth. I only glassed the
      Message 39 of 39 , Sep 16, 2001
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        Comments below:


        --- In bolger@y..., ravenous@g... wrote:
        > Frank,
        > what weight glass cloth did you use on the outside of the hull?
        Did
        > you glass right over the chine logs in one piece?

        I built the boat pretty much exactly as Jim MIchalak specifies, with
        a few minor exceptions. I *think* I used 6oz cloth. I only glassed
        the bottom on the outside. First I did the bottom with the cloth,
        covering the chine logs completely on the sides (but not going any
        farther down the sides (the hull was upside down of course). Then I
        laid 3" tape on the corners of the chine logs. Finally, I added some
        extra layers of tape in the bow grounding area.

        > Did you epoxy coat the inside or the deck?

        Nope. I just used oil based house paint and primer, but I will use
        Latex from now on. Of course I religiously knocked out all of the
        little knot hole losse pieces and filled them with thickened epoxy.

        > I'm starting the AF4 and
        > am thinking about a light glass inside and out after completing the
        > hull to avoid the checking of cheap BC Pine ply.
        >
        > Have you experienced any checking yet with the Fir?

        I used AC Fir from the local yard. Yes I have had some checking, but
        it doesn't bother me. I used a plywood pirogue for many years (in
        South Lousiana) that was checked all over and never had any
        problems. One bulkhead, however seems to be made of a defective 1/4"
        sheet which has a 4" bubble de-laminated. I think I'll have to
        replace the bulkhead in a year or so.

        I do keep the boat in a garage, but may put her outside soon. We will
        see what happens. I made a little A-frame to drape a tarp over her
        open areas.

        > Any thoughts appreciated. I've bookmarked your site. It is very
        > informative and helpful. Beautiful boat.
        >
        >
        >
        > > I built my 16' AF3 Sharpie, "Cream Cheese," for about $1,800 not
        > > including trailer and gratuitous marine supplies, but I bet I
        could
        > > do it for $1200 if I felt like it.
        > >
        > > http://www.geocities.com/sanmi
        > >
        > > Frank
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