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Re: Paradox--Opinions Please

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  • ellengaest@boatbuilding.com
    Hmmmm, You can rent the tools,cheap.There are books that do explain this keel pouring process,step by step.And,if you work carefully without too many
    Message 1 of 39 , Sep 3, 2001
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      Hmmmm,
      You can rent the tools,cheap.There are books that do explain this
      keel pouring process,step by step.And,if you work carefully without
      too many distractions it can be accomplished with relative ease.This
      is not high tech stuff like computers but very basic,almost primitive
      in excecution.
      If a complete klutz like myself can do it,hell...... just about
      anyone can.
      You can check out how I did mine here:
      http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/articles/micro/index.htm

      However,if it still spooks you,then Peter V's suggestions are
      good!
      Sincerely,
      Peter Lenihan,all thumbs,toes and a few digits but precious little
      high tech skills especially with damned computers,here on the shores
      of the St.Lawrence...........



      --- In bolger@y..., pvanderw@o... wrote:
      >
      > I remember reading a post just within the last couple weeks from a
      > Micro builder who had built his keel mold and had the lead poured by
      > a pro. It seems a very good approach to me, if you don't want to
      > equip yourself (with tools, knowledge and courage) to do the pour
      > yourself.
      >
      > If I remember correctly, it was a scrap metals dealer in this case,
      > but I have also seen posts citing a friendly reception at a firm
      that
      > specialized in lead shielding for x-ray (and other medical)
      > installations. I think it may also be possible to buy a lead slab of
      > the right thickness from the medical shielding folds and cutting out
      > the shape you want, then selling the scrap back to them.
      >
      > A third approach, available here in New England and probably in most
      > coastal areas, is to have the ballast installed by a pro boat shop.
      >
      > Check out your phone book.
      >
      > Peter
    • sanmi@yahoo.com
      ... Did ... I built the boat pretty much exactly as Jim MIchalak specifies, with a few minor exceptions. I *think* I used 6oz cloth. I only glassed the
      Message 39 of 39 , Sep 16, 2001
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        Comments below:


        --- In bolger@y..., ravenous@g... wrote:
        > Frank,
        > what weight glass cloth did you use on the outside of the hull?
        Did
        > you glass right over the chine logs in one piece?

        I built the boat pretty much exactly as Jim MIchalak specifies, with
        a few minor exceptions. I *think* I used 6oz cloth. I only glassed
        the bottom on the outside. First I did the bottom with the cloth,
        covering the chine logs completely on the sides (but not going any
        farther down the sides (the hull was upside down of course). Then I
        laid 3" tape on the corners of the chine logs. Finally, I added some
        extra layers of tape in the bow grounding area.

        > Did you epoxy coat the inside or the deck?

        Nope. I just used oil based house paint and primer, but I will use
        Latex from now on. Of course I religiously knocked out all of the
        little knot hole losse pieces and filled them with thickened epoxy.

        > I'm starting the AF4 and
        > am thinking about a light glass inside and out after completing the
        > hull to avoid the checking of cheap BC Pine ply.
        >
        > Have you experienced any checking yet with the Fir?

        I used AC Fir from the local yard. Yes I have had some checking, but
        it doesn't bother me. I used a plywood pirogue for many years (in
        South Lousiana) that was checked all over and never had any
        problems. One bulkhead, however seems to be made of a defective 1/4"
        sheet which has a 4" bubble de-laminated. I think I'll have to
        replace the bulkhead in a year or so.

        I do keep the boat in a garage, but may put her outside soon. We will
        see what happens. I made a little A-frame to drape a tarp over her
        open areas.

        > Any thoughts appreciated. I've bookmarked your site. It is very
        > informative and helpful. Beautiful boat.
        >
        >
        >
        > > I built my 16' AF3 Sharpie, "Cream Cheese," for about $1,800 not
        > > including trailer and gratuitous marine supplies, but I bet I
        could
        > > do it for $1200 if I felt like it.
        > >
        > > http://www.geocities.com/sanmi
        > >
        > > Frank
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