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Tools required to scarf thin plywood

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  • John Kennedy
    Before I go out to purchase a low-angle block plane, is there any other hand-tool which will let me scarf plywood accurately? I have to cut a scarf edge on
    Message 1 of 12 , Aug 31, 2001
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      Before I go out to purchase a low-angle block plane, is there any other
      hand-tool which will let me scarf plywood accurately? I have to cut a
      scarf edge on some plywood which is on the boat, then scarf new plywood to
      go into it.

      A bit tought to put the entire boat on a work-bench (grin), so it strikes me
      my choices are limited.

      I don't have (and can't afford) a router, so it's either a plane (of which I
      have several, but no low-angle block plane), a wide (or other?) chisel, a
      saw, or a disc sander.

      All I've ever read indicates the low-angle block plane as the tool of
      choice.

      Any other suggestions?

      Thanks.

      John S. Kennedy
    • richard@spellingbusiness.com
      Have no luck with block planes myself. Why don t you try a FG but joint? ... other ... cut a ... plywood to ... strikes me ... (of which I ... chisel, a ... of
      Message 2 of 12 , Aug 31, 2001
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        Have no luck with block planes myself. Why don't you try a FG but
        joint?
        --- In bolger@y..., John Kennedy <john.kennedy@g...> wrote:
        > Before I go out to purchase a low-angle block plane, is there any
        other
        > hand-tool which will let me scarf plywood accurately? I have to
        cut a
        > scarf edge on some plywood which is on the boat, then scarf new
        plywood to
        > go into it.
        >
        > A bit tought to put the entire boat on a work-bench (grin), so it
        strikes me
        > my choices are limited.
        >
        > I don't have (and can't afford) a router, so it's either a plane
        (of which I
        > have several, but no low-angle block plane), a wide (or other?)
        chisel, a
        > saw, or a disc sander.
        >
        > All I've ever read indicates the low-angle block plane as the tool
        of
        > choice.
        >
        > Any other suggestions?
        >
        > Thanks.
        >
        > John S. Kennedy
      • Orr, Jamie
        My two bits... If the edge of the ply on the boat is accessible, you can use a hand saw -- I did this on the first scarf I ever cut, and was surprised how well
        Message 3 of 12 , Aug 31, 2001
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          My two bits...

          If the edge of the ply on the boat is accessible, you can use a hand saw --
          I did this on the first scarf I ever cut, and was surprised how well it
          worked -- you may want to clamp a thicker piece of ply to the thin stuff to
          back it up while cutting. I've also used a 1 1/2 inch chisel to finish up
          scarf joints. I think the low angle block plane is used as much because it
          fits into one hand as for the low angle -- if you have any kind of
          one-handed plane, you might try that before spending $.

          On the other hand, its a good excuse reason to buy a new plane.

          I think routers are overrated, it takes longer to set up a jig for accurate
          cuts than it does to do the job by hand.

          Jamie Orr

          -----Original Message-----
          From: John Kennedy [mailto:john.kennedy@...]
          Sent: August 31, 2001 11:24 AM
          To: bolger@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [bolger] Tools required to scarf thin plywood


          Before I go out to purchase a low-angle block plane, is there any other
          hand-tool which will let me scarf plywood accurately? I have to cut a
          scarf edge on some plywood which is on the boat, then scarf new plywood to
          go into it.

          A bit tought to put the entire boat on a work-bench (grin), so it strikes me
          my choices are limited.

          I don't have (and can't afford) a router, so it's either a plane (of which I
          have several, but no low-angle block plane), a wide (or other?) chisel, a
          saw, or a disc sander.

          All I've ever read indicates the low-angle block plane as the tool of
          choice.

          Any other suggestions?

          Thanks.

          John S. Kennedy



          Bolger rules!!!
          - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
          - pls take "personals" off-list, stay on topic, and punctuate
          - add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts, snip all you like
          - To order plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA,
          01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
          - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        • Jeff Blunck
          With a steady hand a disc grinder can work. Epoxy is forgiving with thickener such as wood floor, cabosil, etc. I d also FG tape the dickens out of it. Jeff
          Message 4 of 12 , Aug 31, 2001
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            With a steady hand a disc grinder can work. Epoxy is forgiving with
            thickener such as wood floor, cabosil, etc. I'd also FG tape the dickens
            out of it.

            Jeff

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: <richard@...>
            To: <bolger@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Friday, August 31, 2001 12:32 PM
            Subject: [bolger] Re: Tools required to scarf thin plywood


            > Have no luck with block planes myself. Why don't you try a FG but
            > joint?
            > --- In bolger@y..., John Kennedy <john.kennedy@g...> wrote:
            > > Before I go out to purchase a low-angle block plane, is there any
            > other
            > > hand-tool which will let me scarf plywood accurately? I have to
            > cut a
            > > scarf edge on some plywood which is on the boat, then scarf new
            > plywood to
            > > go into it.
            > >
            > > A bit tought to put the entire boat on a work-bench (grin), so it
            > strikes me
            > > my choices are limited.
            > >
            > > I don't have (and can't afford) a router, so it's either a plane
            > (of which I
            > > have several, but no low-angle block plane), a wide (or other?)
            > chisel, a
            > > saw, or a disc sander.
            > >
            > > All I've ever read indicates the low-angle block plane as the tool
            > of
            > > choice.
            > >
            > > Any other suggestions?
            > >
            > > Thanks.
            > >
            > > John S. Kennedy
            >
            >
            >
            > Bolger rules!!!
            > - no cursing, flaming, trolling, spamming, or flogging dead horses
            > - pls take "personals" off-list, stay on topic, and punctuate
            > - add your comments at the TOP and SIGN your posts, snip all you like
            > - To order plans: Mr. Philip C. Bolger, P.O. Box 1209, Gloucester, MA,
            01930, Fax: (978) 282-1349
            > - Unsubscribe: bolger-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
          • Chris Crandall
            And finally, the best tech information comes from the Feds: http://www2.fpl.fs.fed.us/TechSheets/Chudnoff/TropAmerican/html%20files/virola1new.html Doesn t
            Message 5 of 12 , Aug 31, 2001
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              And finally, the best tech information comes from the Feds:

              http://www2.fpl.fs.fed.us/TechSheets/Chudnoff/TropAmerican/html%20files/virola1new.html

              Doesn't look all that promising to me.

              Chris Crandall crandall@... (785) 864-4131
              Department of Psychology University of Kansas Lawrence, KS 66045
              I have data convincingly disconfirming the Duhem-Quine hypothesis.
            • cadbury@swbell.net
              MDM timber s website lists two types of Brazilian Virola plywood, the main difference being the more expensive panels have virola cores and the cheaper stuff
              Message 6 of 12 , Aug 31, 2001
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                MDM timber's website lists two types of Brazilian Virola
                plywood, the main difference being the more expensive
                panels have virola cores and the cheaper stuff has a
                "combi-core," whatever that means

                Glue used is WBP, same as is used on Okume BS 1088, I am told.

                I am going to buy a sheet and cheak it out.


                Max
              • Harry W. James
                Gougean(I know wrong spelling, to lazy to look up correct) Bros. make a tool called the scarfer that goes on a skill saw, good for up to 3/8 plywood. A decent
                Message 7 of 12 , Aug 31, 2001
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                  Gougean(I know wrong spelling, to lazy to look up correct) Bros. make
                  a tool called the scarfer that goes on a skill saw, good for up to
                  3/8" plywood. A decent block plane is going to cost almost as much as
                  a router.

                  John Kennedy wrote:
                  >
                  > Before I go out to purchase a low-angle block plane, is there any other
                  > hand-tool which will let me scarf plywood accurately? I have to cut a
                  > scarf edge on some plywood which is on the boat, then scarf new plywood to
                  > go into it.
                  >
                  > A bit tought to put the entire boat on a work-bench (grin), so it strikes me
                  > my choices are limited.
                  >
                  > I don't have (and can't afford) a router, so it's either a plane (of which I
                  > have several, but no low-angle block plane), a wide (or other?) chisel, a
                  > saw, or a disc sander.
                  >
                  > All I've ever read indicates the low-angle block plane as the tool of
                  > choice.
                  >
                  > Any other suggestions?
                  >
                  > Thanks.
                  >
                  > John S. Kennedy
                  >
                  >
                • JohnSpoering@aol.com
                  Hi all - Check out the Gougeon s West System web site. They sell an attachment for your skillsaw that is appropriatly called The Scarfer that does the
                  Message 8 of 12 , Aug 31, 2001
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                    Hi all -
                    Check out the Gougeon's West System web site. They sell an attachment
                    for your skillsaw that is appropriatly called "The Scarfer" that does the
                    trick.

                    Aloha - Jack Spoering


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • mwagner@frontiernet.net
                    I ve tried the scarfer - pain the butt. Speaking of the butt. Bolger himself recommends the Payson Joint. Just butt the two pieces of ply together, and put
                    Message 9 of 12 , Sep 1, 2001
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                      I've tried the scarfer - pain the butt. Speaking of "the butt." Bolger
                      himself recommends the "Payson Joint." Just butt the two pieces of ply
                      together, and put two layers of glass tape on each side, with tons of
                      epoxy to soak through everything. I use this joint exclusively since I
                      learned to do it right. Lots faster, easier and just as strong as any
                      scarf.



                      --- In bolger@y..., John Kennedy <john.kennedy@g...> wrote:
                      > Before I go out to purchase a low-angle block plane, is there any
                      other
                      > hand-tool which will let me scarf plywood accurately? I have to
                      cut a
                      > scarf edge on some plywood which is on the boat, then scarf new
                      plywood to
                      > go into it.
                      >
                      > A bit tought to put the entire boat on a work-bench (grin), so it
                      strikes me
                      > my choices are limited.
                      >
                      > I don't have (and can't afford) a router, so it's either a plane (of
                      which I
                      > have several, but no low-angle block plane), a wide (or other?)
                      chisel, a
                      > saw, or a disc sander.
                      >
                      > All I've ever read indicates the low-angle block plane as the tool
                      of
                      > choice.
                      >
                      > Any other suggestions?
                      >
                      > Thanks.
                      >
                      > John S. Kennedy
                    • dcraig@westelcom.com
                      John, there is no easy way around this. Either you re going to buy a block plane and spend the time learning how to use it, or you re going to buy expensive
                      Message 10 of 12 , Sep 1, 2001
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                        John, there is no easy way around this. Either you're going to buy
                        a block plane and spend the time learning how to use it, or you're
                        going to buy expensive power equipment to cut the scarf, but you still
                        need the experience of doing it by hand to do it right with a power
                        tool.
                        Buy the block plane and get a booklet that tells you how to sharpen
                        the edge and adjust the depth of cut. Get some scrap pieces of
                        plywood and clamp some scrap pieces of wood across it as angle guides.
                        Practice cutting the scarf on one piece. Then cut a scarf on the
                        other piece and see how they match up. Line them up edge to edge
                        and see if the two pieces are parallel or cockeyed. Use your eye.
                        Make the adjustment. This is woodworking; it's actually fun. There
                        is no instant easy solution from the home center; other than trial and
                        error and practice on your own time with the hand tool. Practice.
                        Practice.
                        The two edges cut across the grain of plywood are probably going to
                        look like raggedy crap, so plan on putting filler into your epoxy to
                        fill the voids and gaps.

                        Don Craig






                        > --- In bolger@y..., John Kennedy <john.kennedy@g...> wrote:
                        > > Before I go out to purchase a low-angle block plane, is there any
                        > other
                        > > hand-tool which will let me scarf plywood accurately? I have to
                        > cut a
                        > > scarf edge on some plywood which is on the boat, then scarf new
                        > plywood to
                        > > go into it.
                        > >
                        > > A bit tought to put the entire boat on a work-bench (grin), so it
                        > strikes me
                        > > my choices are limited.
                        > >
                        > > I don't have (and can't afford) a router, so it's either a plane
                        (of
                        > which I
                        > > have several, but no low-angle block plane), a wide (or other?)
                        > chisel, a
                        > > saw, or a disc sander.
                        > >
                        > > All I've ever read indicates the low-angle block plane as the tool
                        > of
                        > > choice.
                        > >
                        > > Any other suggestions?
                        > >
                        > > Thanks.
                        > >
                        > > John S. Kennedy
                      • JohnSpoering@aol.com
                        Hi all - Need Help !!! How do I get to see all these pictures you all are posting on our web site? I ve put in the address shown but AOL can t find them
                        Message 11 of 12 , Sep 2, 2001
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                          Hi all -
                          Need Help !!! How do I get to see all these pictures you all
                          are posting on our web site? I've put in the address shown but AOL can't
                          find them (Thats nothing new with AOL) I've gone to Yahoo and entered the
                          address gien but they can't find them either. Any Ideas?
                          Aloha Jack


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • JohnSpoering@aol.com
                          Hi Don & Craig - Here comes my 2 cents worth in this easy scarfing search. The Gougeon brothers sell (less than $25.00) a scarfing attachment for your skill
                          Message 12 of 12 , Sep 2, 2001
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                            Hi Don & Craig -
                            Here comes my 2 cents worth in this easy scarfing search.
                            The Gougeon brothers sell (less than $25.00) a scarfing attachment for your
                            skill type saw that does a great job with very little practice (check out-
                            www.westsystem.com). However on really thin ply it may be hard if your only
                            doing a single layer.
                            I consider myself a fairly good wood worker after 5 homes and as
                            many boats but I've always had trouble grinding or planing scarfs by hand to
                            get what I would consider an attractive joint when finished. My hats off to
                            you if it's something you can do on a regular basis. I really think that
                            Paysons system is simply the very best way to go especially since it's
                            something your going to do on only one boat - at least for a while.
                            I know he explains it very well in his books, but simply all
                            you really need in the line of tools is a disc sander attachment for your
                            electric drill. Butt the 2 pcs of ply together tightly and disc sand a
                            slight depression down the seam. Using a roll of 4" and a roll of 6" glass
                            tape - epoxy a strip of 4" down the seam followed immediately by a strip of
                            6" right on top. Allow it to dry over nite and disc sand the glass edges to
                            a feather edge. Flip it all over and repeat the process on the other side
                            and your done and have a joint that's stronger than the wood - if it breaks
                            the wood comes apart not the glassed joint. It's sooo simple. I've done it
                            on cabin tops and severat Wharram Cats I've built.

                            Good Luck - Aloha - Jack Spoering


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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