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Re: Melting lead wheel weights

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  • Lincoln Ross
    Only problem with cooking pan is someone trying to cook with it. I had this happen with a housemate many years ago, and I had to smash the frypan with a brick
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 27, 2001
      Only problem with cooking pan is someone trying to cook with it. I had
      this happen with a housemate many years ago, and I had to smash the
      frypan with a brick to keep it out of our systems. Don't even ask abou
      t the Penta dip in the salad bowl...

      I've poured lead for plumbing and for scuba weights on a commercial
      stove under a powerful hood fan. Worked fine. Plumbing places used to
      sell, and may still sell, containers to melt in and ladles that don't
      look like cooking gear. Worst part was walking down the hall with the
      lead to pour around pipe flange (sealed against the lead with oakum,
      believe it or not).
      --- In bolger@y..., richard@s... wrote:
      > Best crucible would be a cooking pan. Aluminum is ok, but iron would
      > be better. Coffee cans are pretty flimsy, but I've used them. Use a
      > camp stove to heat it up.
      >
      > Remember to superheat. Heat the batch for about 45-60 seconds after
      > the last piece of lead had melted.
      >
      > Skim the dross, kill the flame, and pour.
      >
      > Have something ready to pour the extra metal in.
      >
      > Metal is best for the backing, though you can get away with wood,
      > drywall, concrete board, etc.
      >
      > --- In bolger@y..., garth@b... wrote:
      > > I just got about ten pounds of free lead wheel weights from my
      > local
      > > garage. Any tips on melting them for use as weight in a couple of
      > my
      > > kick-up rudders?
      > >
      > > Do you need to clean them in any special way before melting?
      > >
      > > Can you just melt them in a coffee can with a blow torch?
      > >
      > > I know about wearing protective eyewear and heavy sleeves/pants/,
      > > etc. And making sure there's no water in the mix.
      > >
      > > Any thoughts on what is best to back the hole you cut in the
      > rudder?
      > > I've seen some places recommend an asbestos board. Will anything
      > less
      > > suffice? It's a pretty small volume I'll be pouring -- so it ought
      > to
      > > cool fast. Is plywood OK?
      > >
      > > Thanks for any advice.
      > >
      > > All best,
      > > Garth
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